Best Yacht Charter Specials Right Now

Still deciding whether you should charter a luxury yacht now or later in the year? Take a look at the best yacht charter specials available right now. Spend the amazing time with friends and family in the Caribbean and Bahamas, enjoy the sunshine and beautiful islands of Asia, or attend the Spring Events in the Mediterranean.

G3

Special winter offer | US$140,000 per week plus expenses | Bahamas and Turks & Caicos

12 guests – 5 cabins – 8 crew – 44m LOA

Exterior superyacht G3

 

CYAN

20% Discount | From US$156,800 per week plus expenses | Caribbean

12 guests – 6 cabins – 11 crew – 48.70m LOA

CYAN

 

RENA

Special winter offer | US$99,000 per week plus expenses | Grenadines, Windward Island & Central America

12 guests – 5 cabins – 8 crew – 44.20m LOA

RENA – exterior

SOUTHERN STAR

No delivery fees | US$25,000 per week plus expenses | Windward Island, Caribbean

6 guests – 3 cabin – 3 crew – 23.95m LOA

Sailing yacht Southern Star

SALUZI

20% discount | US$384,000 per week plus expenses | South East Asia

32 guests – 16 cabins – 32 crew – 69m LOA

Saluzi Superyacht

 

JUST RIGHT

Special winter rate | US$32,000 per week plus expenses | Bahamas

9 guests – 4 cabins – 4 crew – 30m LOA

JUST RIGHT

 

ASPIRE OF LONDON

Special summer rate | EUR € 26,000 per week plus expenses | Sardinia

8 guests – 4 cabins – 2 crew – 23.20m LOA

Aspire of London

 

LEGEND

No delivery fees | from EUR€ 400,000 per week plus expenses | The Sea of Cortez and Caribbean

26 guests – 13 cabins – 19 crew – 77.40m LOA

All-goer explorer superyacht Legend in Antarctica. Photo credit CharterWorld

 

SIRENA

25 – 30% discount | EUR€ 7,665 – 12,555 per week plus expenses | Adriatic

12 guests – 6 cabins – 4 crew – 28m LOA

SIRENA

 

JaJaRo

Based in Porto Cervo, no delivery fees to Amalfi or French Riviera | from EUR€ 49,000 per week plus expenses  | West Mediterranean

8 guests – 4 cabins – 5 crew – 31m LOA

JaJaRo – Main shot

Source: http://ift.tt/1jN0mps

Andrew Tilin, Cyclist and Author of “The Doper Next Door,” Dies in Bicycle-Vehicle Crash

Andrew Tilin, a well-known cycling journalist and amateur bike racer, died from injuries sustained after being hit by a truck early Saturday morning in Austin, Texas, while he was fixing a tire on the side of the road, reports the Austin American-Statesman.

Tilin, 52, was probably most known for writing The Doper Next Door in 2011. The book looked into how testosterone affected bike-racing performance through the lens of an everyday cyclist. During his reporting and research, he took testosterone for nearly a year to see how it affected him both physically and emotionally. Tilin also wrote for Bicycling and was a friend and colleague to many of our staff and contributors. His feature on radical bike-fit guru Steve Hogg, The Heretic Will See You Now, appeared in November 2014 issue of the magazine. 

Tilin wrote frequently for Outside, where he was a contributing editor and in 2014 he reported on the war between bikes and cars. In that story, Tilin noted the persistent and myriad dangers cyclists in the United States face. "Riders take to the roads and take their chances," he wrote. "There, they can encounter distracted, impatient, or drunk drivers, lane-hogging SUVs, deteriorating pavement, and traffic-clogged grids. Multiple dangers exist from coast to coast."

The crash that killed Tilin occurred along Marshall Ford Road and FM 620 Road, medics reported to Outside. Tilin was riding with Austin’s Gruppo VOP cycling club on a foggy morning. About 30 miles into the ride, he pulled onto the side of a road to change a flat tire when a truck careened into him after it was hit by another vehicle that skidded on slick pavement.

The American-Statesman reported that members of Gruppo VOP are planning a memorial for Tilin, who lived in Austin since 2011 and became an active member of the cycling community. Following the news, Tilin’s death was met by an outpouring of emotion on social media during the weekend. 

Andrew Tilin78284 Source: http://ift.tt/2w5Oysm

The inaugural DiRT World Championships are underway

The inaugural DiRT World Championships are now underway.

Utilising DiRT 4, the very first round sees players get behind the wheel of a Group A car as they tackle a two-stage rally in Australia. Players have the choice of the Lancia Delta HF Integrale, Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution VI, 1995 Subaru Impreza, and the Ford Escort RS Cosworth.

The DiRT World Championships can be found under the “Community Events” section in DiRT 4. The eSports event will see players competing online in both rally and rallycross events with the goal to make it into the live-streamed quarter-finals and semi-finals.

The final itself will be live-streamed on Motorsport.tv on May 26 at the Speedmachine festival (which hosts the British round of the FIA World Rallycross Championship).

The DiRT World Championships will host a total of six weekly qualifying rounds. The two fastest times on every platform (PlayStation 4, Xbox and PC) will qualify for the quarterfinals.

You can view the latest leaderboards for each platform here.

Source: http://ift.tt/2vxLMhE

Dilbar – the secretive superyacht titan

Superyacht DILBAR has been photographed cruising through the waters of the Western Mediterranean, and her angle on the ground reveals what a truly imposing presence she is:

Launched by Lurssen in 2014, 156m/512ft mega yacht DILBAR belongs to Russian billionaire Alisher Usmanov and is one of the world’s largest superyachts. She has an incredible beam of 24m/79ft to create an interior volume of 15,917 GT. She won Motor Yacht of the Year for the Displacement Motoryacht 3,000 GT and Above category and features an exterior design from Espen Oeino while the interiors are courtesy of Winch Design.

Dilbar. Photo credit Jarrad Yates: SuperyachtsGibraltar

Packed full of amenities, she is fully prepared to entertain at dockside events and a smaller cruising group of 20 will feel truly pampered in the on board beauty salon, spa massage room, sauna, steam room, 180m³ swimming pool or cinema.

In an effort to guard privacy there are few outdoor spaces, however, the bow and sundeck are each fitted with a helipad and the former can be used as an entertaining space.

Dilbar with helicopter. Photo credit Jarrad Yates: SuperyachtsGibraltar

The diesel-electric engines are the largest ever to be installed on a superyacht and give M/Y DILBAR a top speed of 22.5 knots.

Superyacht DILBAR sleeps up to 20 guests, while her crew of 47 ensures that everything runs at peak efficiency throughout the journey.

Dilbar – aft view. Photo credit Jarrad Yates: SuperyachtsGibraltar

Currently berthed in Barcelona, mega yacht DILBAR has previously been photographed cruising along the Mediterranean to Porto Cervo in Sicily, moored at Valetta in Malta and the Monaco marina along the French Riviera. The OneOcean Port Vell marina has the world’s most expensive superyacht berth at 160m/525ft in length specially bought by Alisher Usmanov for Dilbar. This berth is reportedly worth around €15-20 million and is secured until the lease runs out in 2036.

Source: http://ift.tt/1jN0mps

The inaugural DiRT World Championships are underway

The inaugural DiRT World Championships are now underway.

Utilising DiRT 4, the very first round sees players get behind the wheel of a Group A car as they tackle a two-stage rally in Australia. Players have the choice of the Lancia Delta HF Integrale, Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution VI, 1995 Subaru Impreza, and the Ford Escort RS Cosworth.

The DiRT World Championships can be found under the “Community Events” section in DiRT 4. The eSports event will see players competing online in both rally and rallycross events with the goal to make it into the live-streamed quarter-finals and semi-finals.

The final itself will be live-streamed on Motorsport.tv on May 26 at the Speedmachine festival (which hosts the British round of the FIA World Rallycross Championship).

The DiRT World Championships will host a total of six weekly qualifying rounds. The two fastest times on every platform (PlayStation 4, Xbox and PC) will qualify for the quarterfinals.

You can view the latest leaderboards for each platform here.

Source: http://ift.tt/2vxLMhE

Forza Racing Championship 2018 announced ahead of April launch

The first Forza Motorsport 7-hosted Forza Racing Championship series has been officially announced, ahead of its launch on 2nd April 2018.

Set to kick off in full after an IMSA-presented, pre-season invitational event on 24th March, the Forza Racing Championship 2018 is expected to be the largest in ForzaRC history – with over $250,000 worth of rewards set to be distributed over the course of the competition.

Official details on the tournament structures and the featured cars and tracks have yet to be revealed. However, Forza Motorsport developer Turn 10 Studios has confirmed the 2018 Forza Racing Championship will consist of two seven-week long series, with the top 24 players from each series being eligible for the ‘World Championship’ finals in October 2018.

The provisional schedule for the 2018 Forza Racing Championship has been listed below. Forza Motorsport 7 players who are interested in participating in the 2018 ForzaRC can register for the competition here.

24th March 2018
– Pre-Season Invitational Presented By IMSA

2nd April to 23rd May 2018
– Series 1 events

16th June to 17th June 2018
– Series 1 Play-Offs

9th July to 29th August 2018
– Series 2 events

29th September to 30th September
– Series 2 Play-Offs

October 2018
– World Championship finals Source: http://ift.tt/2vxLMhE

Forza Racing Championship 2018 announced ahead of April launch

The first Forza Motorsport 7-hosted Forza Racing Championship series has been officially announced, ahead of its launch on 2nd April 2018.

Set to kick off in full after an IMSA-presented, pre-season invitational event on 24th March, the Forza Racing Championship 2018 is expected to be the largest in ForzaRC history – with over $250,000 worth of rewards set to be distributed over the course of the competition.

Official details on the tournament structures and the featured cars and tracks have yet to be revealed. However, Forza Motorsport developer Turn 10 Studios has confirmed the 2018 Forza Racing Championship will consist of two seven-week long series, with the top 24 players from each series being eligible for the ‘World Championship’ finals in October 2018.

The provisional schedule for the 2018 Forza Racing Championship has been listed below. Forza Motorsport 7 players who are interested in participating in the 2018 ForzaRC can register for the competition here.

24th March 2018
– Pre-Season Invitational Presented By IMSA

2nd April to 23rd May 2018
– Series 1 events

16th June to 17th June 2018
– Series 1 Play-Offs

9th July to 29th August 2018
– Series 2 events

29th September to 30th September
– Series 2 Play-Offs

October 2018
– World Championship finals Source: http://ift.tt/2vxLMhE

RORC Caribbean 600 fleet faces record-setting pace in punchy tradewinds

A record entry of 84 yachts have got off to a flying start in the RORC Caribbean 600 race and could be on course for a record

rA record fleet got off to a squally start from Antigua today in the RORC Caribbean 600 race. Some 84 starters, the largest number in the event’s ten-year history, crossed the line to punch their way up the first beat towards Barbuda in winds of 25-30 knots.

Strong northerly tradewinds mean that the record of 32 hours could be broken this year – and by diverse contenders, such as George David’s newly re-optimised Rambler 88 and the 42ft fully foiling G4 ‘missile’ catamaran being raced by America’s Cup sailor (and local) Shannon Falcone.

The course takes yachts on a torturous 600-mile route around the islands of Barbuda, Nevis, Saba, St Barth, Guadeloupe, Montserrat and back via Barbuda and Redonda, and features nearly every wind angle. This makes it a surprisingly tough and interesting event, something that has contributed to its steady growth, year on year.

Watch the race preview here>

The event was first suggested by former RORC marketing consultant John Burnie and sailmaker Stan Pearson and launched in 2008 after being taken up by the club’s CEO, Eddie Warden-Owen. It began with a small fleet of 24 yachts, and made a loss, but Warden-Owen stuck with it.

(“It was suggested we should run it every other year,” Warden-Owen recalls, “and I remember our treasurer saying: ‘That’s great; it will take us twice as long to go broke!’”)

But Warden-Owen felt it needed to be an annual part of the calendar to gain momentum, and was right. Word soon got out that the Caribbean 600 was a fun but tricky event and anything but the dawdle round the islands some might have assumed. Over the last decade, it has evolved into a genuine Blue Riband event.

Today it ranks with the Rolex Middle Sea Race and even the RORC’s own Fastnet Race as a must-do offshore event, arduous in its own special way, but also sunny…and in the Caribbean…and in February.

Compared with the other major 600-milers, this race is even more international, with entries from 27 countries, most of which have sailed thousands of miles to take part.

So today the RORC Caribbean 600 is firmly established, with a fleet that spans yachts as small as 30ft – the smallest is the open Seacart 30 – through a clutch of Class 40s and chartered production racers up to supermaxis such as Ludde Ingvall’s CQS, Maxi 72 Proteus, Rambler 88 and a handful of superyachts such as Southern Wind SW102 Farfalla.

The crew lists glitter with top pros: America’s Cup sailors such as Brad Butterworth and Stu Bannatyne, Volvo and Vendée racers like Guillermo Altadill, US Olympic Gold medallist Jonathan McKee, plus a score of top navigators.

They enjoy it because this race can be a real challenge. Last year on Proteus, Stu Bannatyne tells me, they made “over 70 sail changes”. In a race lasting under two days, that’s a change on average every 45 minutes.

Fleet measurer Sandy Mair has done the race four times. “It’s a tough, tough race,” he tells me.

“You have legs that are 70 miles hard on the wind, brutal beats where the race can be won or lost, fast spinnaker runs, you’ve got 12 hours in the beating sun and 12 hours of darkness where, because you’re wet, you get cold. You feel really beaten up at the end,” he says, smiling as he says it.

Pro sailor and navigator Wouter Verbraak agrees. He is not sailing this year thanks to a skiing injury but recalls it as “very intense”. It is, he says, “a race all about gear changes. It’s a big job for the navigators to anticipate them. It is a really a great all-round challenge for crews, from driving to trimming to your bow team.

“It is hard because of the lack of opportunity for recovery and it’s really difficult to run a proper watch system. So you don’t get into a rhythm and it can be hard to manage the energy of your crew.

“You will have squalls in the morning and in the late afternoon, so you can end up damp and cold. It’s a bite-sized race, with bite-sized chunks of misery,” he says, laughing uproariously.

“But,” he adds, “it’s always just another 60 miles to the next point. There are a lot of corners, so there are a lot of opportunities. It’s intense but the weather is pleasant, there’s a lot of variety – and it’s scenic.”

The Caribbean 600 provides some fantastic challenges for navigators and, along with all the high-tech tools, features some good, old-fashioned Mk 1 eyeball skills and tactical challenges.

Weaving in and round squalls, and working out visually which might have wind, and on which sides, and which will be sucking out wind, is vital. So is working out how to avoid the wind shadows round some of the higher islands – and even working out where these might extend to if you arrive there in darkness.

“There are a lot of theories for day and night that you can break your head on,” says Verbraak.

All of which makes this race a special one for competitors, and for many an ideal introduction to serious offshore racing – all achievable in a week or ten days away from the office.

>>

Follow the finish of the race on this site, and we will also have photos and on board videos from the race on the Yachting World Facebook page.

The post RORC Caribbean 600 fleet faces record-setting pace in punchy tradewinds appeared first on Yachting World.

Source: http://ift.tt/1EzFtUo

Pro Racer’s Take: Ariel Atom 3S

Wind and fury, signifying plenty.

Forgive me, Shakespeare fans, for mangling his words, but those words seem appropriate for the Ariel Atom 3S.

This story begins with me noticing the drive chain on my Ducati Monster 1200R motorcycle needed a little lubrication. Time spent foraging in my garage eventually located nothing but an empty can, so I wobbled off to my local dealer, Two Wheels World in Pompano Beach, Florida.

As the dealership came into sight I noticed an Ariel Atom 3S sitting out front with several people standing around it. The dealership owner informed me his company is now also an Atom dealer, and then he asked if I’d like to take the demonstrator out for a spin. He didn’t have to twist my arm.

Also on hand was Jesse Kenealy, director of sales at TMI AutoTech Inc. in Virginia. TMI is the company Ariel licenses to manufacture Atoms in the U.S. TMI doesn’t just assemble them; it actually manufactures the cars at its factory about 20 minutes away from Virginia International Raceway. TMI has the rights to sell Ariel’s in North, Central, and South America. The parent company, Ariel U.K., takes care of everywhere else.

Let’s get the psychology out of the way. Nobody looks at this vehicle as a daily driver. Complaining that it doesn’t have cup holders, for instance, would be asinine. It’s not practical and if you think it’s a ridiculous waste of space, you’re obviously not in the market—and you’re probably missing the point altogether.

I like the Atom’s shape, especially from the front and sides. This particular 3S reminds me a little of a Pikes Peak Hill Climb Coyote race car, having the pronounced front wing and dinner-table size rear wing option. It certainly makes a statement.

Getting ready to drive the Ariel reminded me of the steps I take when preparing to ride my motorcycle. Most folks who drive Atoms in the U.K. do so without the windscreen in place and wear helmets for protection from the elements, suicidal birds, and discarded cigarette butts. In the U.S., windscreen and wiper come standard, so no need for my helmet. Part of the preparation means checking weather radar before setting off. The 3S is completely open and unless you’re never stationary, you will get soaked if it rains. I made use of the small storage space under the removable front hood for a rolled-up change of clothes, just in case. Storing a backpack on the passenger seat or down in the passenger foot well works, but other than that, whatever else you need should probably be in your pocket.

Getting into the 3S is no issue at all, as long as you can climb over stuff. Grab the roll cage, step onto the driver seat, and use the roll cage and seat bolster to lower yourself in. Even though the steering wheel is removable, it’s tiny and was never in my way during ingress or egress. This particular 3S has four-point harness seat belts for both seats. There is also a six-point option, which Ariel recommends for track work. Learning that 90 percent of owners never take these cars to the track surprised me, as I know I certainly would.

The 3S has two items necessary for starting the engine. One is a small proximity fob and the other is a red master key for turning the power on and off. Happily, I could reach the master key’s exterior location while sitting in the driver’s seat, a good thing since on several occasions I forgot to turn it on before climbing into the car.

Both seats are bolted to the floor, but TMI provides several location holes so some customization can be done for each owner. The demo car’s seat was a little far away from the pedals for me, so I used some padding to get properly sorted. You certainly need to be in the right position when driving this little rocket.

The steering wheel has no distracting, stupid, needless buttons on it. Not one. This alone might make the 3S worth the $89,975 entry fee. Optioned up with the carbon wing package ($5,975), premium paint, powder coated chassis, and logo-trimmed seats, this 3S listed at $101,515.

I found the brakes very easy to modulate and not grabby. The brake-bias adjustment is nice and progressive, though the 3S has no ABS. The adjustable traction control is not overly intrusive in the lower settings and can be turned off completely if you so desire.

Seeing the 3S’s front wheels turn while driving reminds me of being in something like a Formula Ford. Each parking lot feels like your own a racetrack paddock, adrenaline building by the second as you make your way out. A bit melodramatic? I can assure you, the friendly low-speed engine burble masks an underlying violent streak the UFC would be proud of.

Due to low gearing, launching the 3S is very easy. There is no need to dump the clutch to achieve a really hard launch. I found that spinning the engine to 2,500 rpms and a quick clutch release (not a dump) produced a rocket launch and virtually zero wheel spin or traction-control intervention. The nicely tuned suspension setup, rear engine weight, low gearing and Toyo R888R tires all combine for excellent launch capability.

The 3S weighs just 1,450 pounds. Its 2.4-liter i-VTEC Honda Civic engine springs to life the moment you press the starter button located on the dash near the steering wheel. Turbocharging takes engine output to a healthy 365 horsepower at 7,500 rpm and 310 lb-ft of torque at 4,400 rpm. The six-speed manual gearbox is superb and also comes from the Civic. It is a beautifully easy gearbox to use, whether shifting fast or slowly.

The steering wheel is small and needs a reasonable amount of effort to turn in parking lots. All necessary switches are behind or next to the steering wheel. Similar to riding a motorcycle, you’ll get used to where the controls are located, ultimately using them without looking. For instance, the turn signals operate by a little left/right toggle switch and do not self-cancel. I had no issue remembering to cancel them as operation is identical to a motorcycle’s; regular car drivers may need some time. But many new U.S. Ariel buyers are people who come from motorcycles because they see too many distracted car drivers out there and want a little more protection while having their fun.

I found road and wind noise to be reasonably acceptable with no hint of buffeting. Should you in fact want to talk to a passenger, you can certainly do so at low speeds and in a louder voice at freeway speeds. If you don’t like your passenger, just keep it above 80 mph.

On-center steering is stable, requiring very little driver input to stay centered on freeways or around town. Uneven pavement might require a little steering correction but no more than it does with most sports cars. The Toyo R888R tires are nice and sticky, but you don’t need to be in a four-wheel drift and totally on the limit to appreciate the performance of the 3S. The chassis immediately transfers what’s going on with the tires back to the driver, through the steering wheel and seat; it is very similar to a well setup race car. I found corner carving at 6/10ths almost as much fun as at 10/10ths, and a tad less traumatic for more sensitive passengers.

The 3S is incredibly quick off the line. The low gearing means you’ll blow through first and second gear in around two seconds. You almost have to shift out of first gear as soon as you fully release the clutch pedal, in order not hit the rev limiter. Zero to 60 mph is quoted at an admirable and socially unacceptable 2.8 seconds. Below 100 mph, the 3S will pull away from almost any other production car. But don’t only look at the raw numbers—remember, the 3S needs two manual shifts on its way to 60 mph, certainly losing time against a double-clutch automatic gearbox. Still, with driver weight added (let’s say the driver weighs 165 pounds), a Porsche 911 Turbo S has about 6.4 pounds per horsepower, while the 3S has only about 4.4 pounds per horsepower. Manual gearbox or not, the 3S really is explosive on acceleration.

I am an auditory junky when it comes to cars and motorcycles, and the 3S is one of the best overall sound machines I have ever driven. I can’t point to any one thing, it’s a mix. Let’s say you’re going along at 30 mph in third gear and decide to punch it: You immediately hear the exhaust note get seriously deeper and louder, along with an increasing rush of air noise starting to bellow from the massive air intake. In my cartoon mind, I imagine water from some broken dam hidden deep inside the intake is rushing toward my right ear. An increasing whine from the turbocharger finishes off this whole symphony perfectly. But wait, there’s more. As you lift off the gas to shift, that awesome twitter sound, loved by turbo fans everywhere, literally blasts from the turbo blow-off valve. I swear it sounds exactly like the old Porsche 935 and Audi Quattro turbo race cars.

After 5 minutes I was addicted. I would drive along in one gear for miles, accelerating and then lifting off the gas just to hear all the wonderful ear candy. The fact the 3S accelerates quicker than virtually anything on the street and handles like a slot car was actually lost on me for days. All I could talk about was the amazing soundtrack. Of course, I do find it hard to keep friends, as you can imagine.
















The Ariel Atom 3S is a rather special vehicle. It certainly isn’t cheap, but I suspect the folks seriously looking at purchasing one aren’t worried about cost. The 3S is rewarding to drive at any speed and let’s not forget the incredible ear candy. I received more attention while driving it and more questions while parked than with any other vehicle I’ve driven; nothing even comes close. You buy a 3S because you want to have a ridiculously fun experience, which it provides in shovel loads. Expensive? No argument. Worth it? Heck yes.

2017 Ariel Atom 3S Specifications

ON SALE Now
PRICE $89,975/$101,515 (base/as tested)
ENGINE 2.4L DOHC 16-valve turbo I-4/365 hp @ 7,500 rpm, 310 lb-ft @ 4,400 rpm
TRANSMISSION 6-speed automatic
LAYOUT  0-door, 2-passenger, mid-engine, RWD roadster
EPA MILEAGE N/A
L x W x H 134.2 x 74.4 x 47.0 in
WHEELBASE 92.3 in
WEIGHT 1,450 lb
0-60 MPH 2.8 sec
TOP SPEED 155 mph

The post Pro Racer’s Take: Ariel Atom 3S appeared first on Automobile Magazine.

Source: http://ift.tt/LhoIaq

FORTY-EIGHT HARLEY-DAVIDSON NAMUR

The project was born from the idea of ​​participating in some races that say ¼ miles. The whole team will participate in a race. The basic bike is a Forty-Eight XL 1200X. This is a custom but also a concept designed as a new model of the Harley range with very little accessory, which can be adapted to the choices of our customers.

 

A comfortable saddle, a tank capacity of over 10 liters. A coffee racer must have remote controls, offers better support and therefore greater control of the bike. From the beginning of the year it is possible to make this modification by opening the official catalog of Harley-Davidson accessories; all models of the Sportster range can be equipped with them. The quality and ease of implementation are therefore at the appointment. It’s the same for the handlebars, the "clip-on" kit is available and allows you to adopt a decidedly "racer" position! In order not to put safety aside, the mirrors are elements specially adapted to this new position. A runner must also be efficient, which is why a new map and a Screamin ‘Eagle filter have been installed, which allows a better "breathing" of the engine. Phat Sreamin ‘Eagle spark plug cables complete the list of improvements.

February 19, 2018 at 08:18PMSource: RocketGarage http://ift.tt/opz3Y8