JUST1’s MX helmet range expands

After recently introducing itself to the Australian dirtbike community, Just1 continues to gain momentum as a leading brand by combining high quality equipment, competitive prices and an aggressive style that’s been welcomed by riders the world over. 

Just1 carbon helmet motocross logoJust1 carbon helmet motocross logo

The J12 Carbon Fluro is the latest model available to motorcycle stores around the country, combining the sleek, strong carbon finish and bright fluro colours with the aerodynamics, high end features and incredibly lightweight construction that many riders have already had the chance to experience in the J12 helmet. 

The helmet is now now from all good motorcycle stores.

Head to www.ficeda.com.au for more information. 

Key Features:

  • Full carbon outer shell construction 
  • Two inner and two outer shell sizes for optimum fit and comfort 
  • Wide eye port to fit goggles
  • Protective internal polystyrene foam shell with air channels 
  • Inside chin guard with air vents 
  • Multiple air vents with anti-intrusion aluminium nets 
  • Adjustable peak with air vents 
  • Removable and washable inner lining, highly breathable fabrics and hygienically treated 
  • Anatomical structure with the exclusive “N.B.F.F.” system (Neck Brace Front Fit) 
  • ECE Homologation 
  • J.1.E.R. emergency cheek pad removal system 
  • Double-D retention system 

Just1 carbon helmet motocross logo

Available in sizes: XS – XXL.

Colours: Fluro Pink, Fluro Orange.

Price: $649.95

The post JUST1’s MX helmet range expands appeared first on Cycle Torque Magazine.

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​Tour de France 2017 Stage 1 Preview

For the third time in the last four years, the Grand Depart of the 2017 Tour de France will occur outside of the host nation. Taking place in Düsseldorf, Germany, this year’s Tour opens with a 14km individual time trial that’s flat as a pancake—aside from the ramps leading up to two bridges over the Rhine River.

Who to Watch
On paper, Stage 1 is tailor-made for the home favorite, Katusha Alpecin’s Tony Martin. A four-time world time trial champion who’s also won four Tour time trials throughout his career, Martin is indeed the 5-star favorite. But there’s one problem: the weather. With rain forecasted throughout much of the day, tomorrow’s race goes from an (almost) foregone conclusion to a crapshoot in which several riders could win depending on how wet (or dry) the course is at the time of their ride. This means outsiders like BMC’s Stefan Küng and LottoNL-Jumbo riders Jos Van Emden and Primoz Roglic (a former ski jumper who’s now a professional cyclist), have a shot at winning the Tour’s first yellow jersey.

RELATED: How to Watch This Year’s Tour

One of the final riders to start will be Cannondale-Drapac’s Taylor Phinney, a former US national time trial champion who just so happens to be the son of two-time Tour stage winner, Davis Phinney. As for the Tour’s many General Classification contenders, tomorrow’s stage could be a dud. On a short, wet course, the risk of crashing far outweighs the reward of gaining a few seconds on the competition, so if it’s indeed rainy, expect to see men like Team Sky’s Chris Froome, BMC’s Richie Porte, and Movistar’s Nairo Quintana ride conservatively to keep themselves—and their GC hopes—safe.

Want to know how you’d fare in a Tour Stage? Check out this video:

Tour de France, 2017, Stage 1101824 Source: http://ift.tt/eRBKpx

​Women’s WorldTour Adds Three New Events to 2018 Schedule

With the ever-increasing popularity of women’s cycling, the UCI has announced the addition of three events in the UCI Women’s WorldTour for 2018. The events will include the Trois Jours de La Panne in Belgium, the Bira Emakumeen in Spain, and Tour of Guangxi in China.

While this change in the calendar may not seem like a major step, for female racers, it means moving closer to a calendar as jam-packed as that of Men’s WorldTour. In 2017, the men’s WorldTour was comprised of 38 events, while the women had 20. In 2018, the women’s WorldTour will have 23.

Why do WorldTour events matter? Simply put, they’re the biggest and most important road races that riders can enter, with more points and prize money on the line than lower category races.

RELATED: Why Isn’t There a Women’s Tour de France?

The Trois Jours de La Panne has been a men’s race since 1977, but will now feature a new women’s one-day race in the West Flanders region (not on the same day as the men’s race). The Emakumeen Euskal Bira has been running since 1988 as a four-stage race held in the Basque region of Spain. And the one-day Tour of Guangxi was already registered as Class 1 race this year, but will join the World Tour calendar next season.

RELATED: Changes Proposed For Women’s WorldTour

The WorldTour for women started as a World Cup series of nine one-day races in 2015 and became a WorldTour in 2016. In 2018, it will span 23 events and 52 days of racing.

Check out one of the speediest women’s racing bikes out there:

According to the UCI, in 2016, over 300 hours of broadcast time, reaching nearly 80 million TV viewers, showcased women’s racing worldwide. This season, 12 races will be broadcast live, three more than in 2016.

“A huge amount has been achieved over the past two seasons in collaboration with race organizers, teams, riders, partners and media," says UCI Vice-president and President of the UCI Women’s Commission Tracey Gaudry. "I’m confident that this journey of progress will continue in the season ahead.”

“Promoting women’s cycling has always been one of my priorities, and I’m particularly pleased to see the significant progress that has been made on this front over the last few years," added Brian Cookson, current UCI President. "Of course, there is still more to be done and women’ cycling will certainly remain one of my core priorities in the years ahead." (Cookson’s presidency is currently being challenged, so it will be interesting to see if his female-rider-friendly stance scores him votes.)

RELATED: Women’s Tour de France Cancelled for 2017

​Women's WorldTour Adds Three New Events to 2018 Schedule.​98275 Source: http://ift.tt/eRBKpx

Four Questions for Land Rover Design Chief Gerry McGovern

Land Rover chief designer Gerry McGovern has had an exceptional career in design, having started with Chrysler U.K. and worked with Austin Rover when it was part of British Leyland, the last gasp, bound-for-failure conglomerate that consolidated the British motor industry before it was sold off piecemeal to French, American, German, and Indian owners. He had a big part in the last MG sports car, the MG MGF, then did a (retrospectively indifferent) stint at Lincoln at the time Ford was busily and expensively accreting small-scale manufacturers it didn’t know what to do with. But his return to the U.K. to concentrate on Land Rover has been brilliant.

At this year’s Geneva show, where the Range Rover Velar was introduced, we had only 30 seconds to give McGovern a thumbs-up gesture and a good word. To glean a little more, we talked by telephone while he was at the New York auto show in April.

Automobile Magazine: Gerry, what’s your favorite aspect of the Velar?

GM: I have to say it’s the long wheelbase that gives us really ideal proportions. It lets the car be smooth and clean architecturally. And, of course, details like the flush door handles
add a lot.

AM: Do pedestrian-safety regulations impose a particular problem for you at Land Rover?

GM: Well, we always have to find a solution that works for the rules and for us, but we always do resolve it. As you know, a low front makes it easier, a higher one adds difficulties, but we’ve managed.

AM: We think the arched trim piece under the tail piece that carries the exhaust outlets is particularly effective. It’s unusual.

GM: We were determined to reduce the mass at the rear, in a different way from the Evoque — more luxurious but still sporty. This allows us to simplify the rear aspect nicely. We do want our cars not to be overly complicated, the “less is more” idea actually.

AM: The interior is certainly quite plain. Is that part of the same philosophy?

GM: It is. We make good use of materials on simple forms to achieve a high level of understated luxury with nothing overdone, so it is not ostentatious in any way. We have a range of colors and different ways to present the interior to suit customer desires.

















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Dale Earnhardt Jr. to start first for potential final Cup race at Daytona

Dale Earnhardt Jr. will start first for his likely final Cup start at Daytona. (Getty)

Is Saturday night shaping up to be a fairytale ending for Dale Earnhardt Jr.’s Cup Series career at Daytona?

Junior won the pole for Saturday’s race on Friday afternoon, posting the fastest lap in each of the two rounds of qualifying and beating teammate Chase Elliott for the top spot. A win at Daytona would likely get Junior into NASCAR’s playoffs in 2017, his final full-time season in the Cup Series.

After he got out of his car, Earnhardt Jr. lamented the lack of utilization of Thursday’s two practice sessions by the 40 drivers entered in Saturday’s race. Because crashes can happen in an instant at a track like Daytona, teams were conservative during practice. Many teams opted out of the second practice and didn’t spend much time drafting in the first one.

“I’ll be honest with you, this track’s a little slick and starting to age. I think all the competitors and crew chiefs need to probably consider spending a little more time drafting and putting more laps on their cars. I sure would have liked to have had that opportunity to get into a little larger pack yesterday. I saw some things from my car that are concerning as far as the balance and I don’t know if a lot of guys got themselves into that situation.”

Junior’s most recent win at Daytona came in the 2015 July race when he won as Austin Dillon’s car went flying into the catchfence. He’s won four points races at the track, including the 2001 July race, the first Cup race at Daytona since the death of Dale Earnhardt Sr. in that year’s Daytona 500.

Here’s the starting lineup for the race.

1. Dale Earnhardt Jr.
2. Chase Elliott
3. Brad Keselowski
4. Kasey Kahne
5. Kevin Harvick
6. Ricky Stenhouse Jr.
7. Joey Logano
8. Jamie McMurray
9. Ryan Blaney
10. Danica Patrick
11. Clint Bowyer
12. Jimmie Johnson
13. Matt Kenseth
14. Trevor Bayne
15. Kurt Busch
16. Kyle Busch
17. Erik Jones
18. Denny Hamlin
19. Austin Dillon
20. Daniel Suarez
21. Kyle Larson
22. Ryan Newman
23. Michael McDowell
24. Paul Menard
25. Martin Truex Jr.
26. Landon Cassill
27. AJ Allmendinger
28. Matt DiBenedetto
29. Chris Buescher
30. David Ragan
31. Darrell Wallace Jr.
32. Brendan Gaughan
33. Elliott Sadler
34. Ty Dillon
35. Cole Whitt
36. Corey LaJoie
37. Reed Sorenson
38. Ryan Sieg
39. Jeffrey Earnhardt
40. DJ Kennington


– – – – – – –

Nick Bromberg is the editor of Dr. Saturday and From the Marbles on Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email him at nickbromberg@yahoo.com or follow him on Twitter!

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Refreshing or Revolting: 2018 BMW X3

The 2018 BMW X3 has been redesigned, and it’s now wearing BMW’s current design language and boasts a new M performance model that looks slightly more aggressive than more pedestrian variants. Let’s take a look at the third-generation X3 and see how its design has evolved inside and out.

As with other BMW models, the 2018 X3 receives an exterior design that is more evolutionary than revolutionary, especially the front fascia, which features a larger kidney grille and wider headlights similar to those on the new 5 Series sedan. The air intakes on the lower front fascia are also bigger than those of its predecessor, giving it a more aggressive look. The headlight clusters feature new LED accent lighting in a C-shaped pattern instead of the “angel eyes” found on past BMW models. From the side, the new X3 looks similar to the vehicle it replaces, but it appears lower to the ground, especially in the M40i guise. A small M badge on the front fenders placed right above the side air inlets gives a subtle indication that the X3 M40i is geared more towards performance.








Out back, there are wider, less angular taillights that are more sculpted than the ones found on the outgoing X3. The X3 M40i also features split dual exhausts that help give the car a wider, more planted stance when viewed from the rear. Inside, the dash now has a freestanding touchscreen with the new iDrive interface while the center stack is tilted slightly toward the driver to give it a more driver-focused feel.

Available with a 248-hp 2.0-liter turbo-four or a 355-hp 3.0-liter turbo I-6, the 2018 BMW X3 features the latest engines from the German automaker, and they’re paired exclusively to an eight-speed automatic transmission. All-wheel drive is standard, and like its predecessor, the new X3 will be assembled at BMW’s Spartanburg, South Carolina facility alongside the X4, X5 and X6 crossovers.








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2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS Revealed at Goodwood

After we got a quick peek at a Microsoft preview and “drove” it in the new Forza Motorsports 7 demo at E3, the new 2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS bared all at this year’s Goodwood Festival of Speed. Don’t worry, it lives up to its name — with 700 hp from the 3.8-liter twin-turbo flat-six, the new 991.2 GT2 RS rightfully claims the title from the old 997.2 GT2 RS as the most powerful Porsche 911 ever put into production.

The new GT2 had some mighty large shoes to fill — namely, the lightened, exclusive, and boosted sneakers still occupied by the old car. Historically, Porsche reserves the GT2 badge for the most hardcore, fastest, and exclusive 911s to emerge from Stuttgart. We’ve enjoyed a GT2 variant from every 911 generation since the 993, and with the 991 entering its twilight years with no GT2, things were looking grim up to this point.

From the looks of the new car, we’re glad we were patient. It seems like Porsche vaulted over the regular, hum-drum GT2 and went straight for the RS model. Perhaps this will be de rigueur for future generations — Porsche also skipped the non-RS GT2 for the 2010-2012 997.2, opting to create the first GT2 RS instead.

The GT2 RS makes use of a highly modified, water-injected 3.8-liter twin-turbo flat-six from the Turbo S, now returning a stunning 700 hp and 553 lb-ft of torque. To put this in perspective, this beats the old car by 80 hp/37 lb-ft, the current GT3 RS by 200 hp, and the Turbo S Exclusive Series by 93 hp.

Like all other GT2s, this power is sent exclusively to the rear tires, in this case the widest tires ever to be fitted to a production 911 — 325/30 ZR21s. As is the case with the GT3 RS, the only transmission available is the venerable seven-speed PDK, a departure from the old GT2 RS’ six-speed manual transmission.

In exchange for a third pedal, the new car gains serious performance figures. 0-60 mph is dispatched in 2.7 seconds, 0-100 mph in 5.8 seconds, and 0-124 mph in 8.3 seconds. Be brave, and the GT2 won’t stop accelerating until it smacks into its 211 mph top speed. Keep in mind Porsche is almost always conservative with its quoted performance figures, so expect independent testing to reveal even stronger numbers.

Don’t worry, there’s all manner of go-fast hardware to keep it safe, including standard carbon ceramic brakes, aggressive aero, rear-wheel steering, and specialized traction and stability control. Like the GT3 RS, it’s lighter than most 911s, thanks to extensive use of carbon fiber and aluminum body panels. Around back, the titanium exhaust is unique to the GT2 RS, further shedding extra bulk, bringing the total down to 3,241 pounds.








Not enough? Buyers looking for that extra inch of asceticism can outfit their GT2 RS with the optional Weissach package. This adds more carbon fiber, titanium, and magnesium components to save an additional 40 pounds.

Shockingly, this isn’t a strictly limited model, unlike the previous car — Porsche will build as many as they can sell. Prices begin at $294,250, and only climb from there, especially with the $31,000 Weissach Package. Get your order in now, as deliveries begin in the first quarter of 2018.

The post 2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS Revealed at Goodwood appeared first on Automobile Magazine.

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2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS Revealed at Goodwood

After we got a quick peek at a Microsoft preview and “drove” it in the new Forza Motorsports 7 demo at E3, the new 2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS bared all at this year’s Goodwood Festival of Speed. Don’t worry, it lives up to its name — with 700 hp from the 3.8-liter twin-turbo flat-six, the new 991.2 GT2 RS rightfully claims the title from the old 997.2 GT2 RS as the most powerful Porsche 911 ever put into production.

The new GT2 had some mighty large shoes to fill — namely, the lightened, exclusive, and boosted sneakers still occupied by the old car. Historically, Porsche reserves the GT2 badge for the most hardcore, fastest, and exclusive 911s to emerge from Stuttgart. We’ve enjoyed a GT2 variant from every 911 generation since the 993, and with the 991 entering its twilight years with no GT2, things were looking grim up to this point.

From the looks of the new car, we’re glad we were patient. It seems like Porsche vaulted over the regular, hum-drum GT2 and went straight for the RS model. Perhaps this will be de rigueur for future generations — Porsche also skipped the non-RS GT2 for the 2010-2012 997.2, opting to create the first GT2 RS instead.

The GT2 RS makes use of a highly modified, water-injected 3.8-liter twin-turbo flat-six from the Turbo S, now returning a stunning 700 hp and 553 lb-ft of torque. To put this in perspective, this beats the old car by 80 hp/37 lb-ft, the current GT3 RS by 200 hp, and the Turbo S Exclusive Series by 93 hp.

Like all other GT2s, this power is sent exclusively to the rear tires, in this case the widest tires ever to be fitted to a production 911 — 325/30 ZR21s. As is the case with the GT3 RS, the only transmission available is the venerable seven-speed PDK, a departure from the old GT2 RS’ six-speed manual transmission.

In exchange for a third pedal, the new car gains serious performance figures. 0-60 mph is dispatched in 2.7 seconds, 0-100 mph in 5.8 seconds, and 0-124 mph in 8.3 seconds. Be brave, and the GT2 won’t stop accelerating until it smacks into its 211 mph top speed. Keep in mind Porsche is almost always conservative with its quoted performance figures, so expect independent testing to reveal even stronger numbers.

Don’t worry, there’s all manner of go-fast hardware to keep it safe, including standard carbon ceramic brakes, aggressive aero, rear-wheel steering, and specialized traction and stability control. Like the GT3 RS, it’s lighter than most 911s, thanks to extensive use of carbon fiber and aluminum body panels. Around back, the titanium exhaust is unique to the GT2 RS, further shedding extra bulk, bringing the total down to 3,241 pounds.








Not enough? Buyers looking for that extra inch of asceticism can outfit their GT2 RS with the optional Weissach package. This adds more carbon fiber, titanium, and magnesium components to save an additional 40 pounds.

Shockingly, this isn’t a strictly limited model, unlike the previous car — Porsche will build as many as they can sell. Prices begin at $294,250, and only climb from there, especially with the $31,000 Weissach Package. Get your order in now, as deliveries begin in the first quarter of 2018.

The post 2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS Revealed at Goodwood appeared first on Automobile Magazine.

Source: http://ift.tt/LhoIaq

2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS Revealed at Goodwood

After we got a quick peek at a Microsoft preview and “drove” it in the new Forza Motorsports 7 demo at E3, the new 2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS bared all at this year’s Goodwood Festival of Speed. Don’t worry, it lives up to its name — with 700 hp from the 3.8-liter twin-turbo flat-six, the new 991.2 GT2 RS rightfully claims the title from the old 997.2 GT2 RS as the most powerful Porsche 911 ever put into production.

The new GT2 had some mighty large shoes to fill — namely, the lightened, exclusive, and boosted sneakers still occupied by the old car. Historically, Porsche reserves the GT2 badge for the most hardcore, fastest, and exclusive 911s to emerge from Stuttgart. We’ve enjoyed a GT2 variant from every 911 generation since the 993, and with the 991 entering its twilight years with no GT2, things were looking grim up to this point.

From the looks of the new car, we’re glad we were patient. It seems like Porsche vaulted over the regular, hum-drum GT2 and went straight for the RS model. Perhaps this will be de rigueur for future generations — Porsche also skipped the non-RS GT2 for the 2010-2012 997.2, opting to create the first GT2 RS instead.

The GT2 RS makes use of a highly modified, water-injected 3.8-liter twin-turbo flat-six from the Turbo S, now returning a stunning 700 hp and 553 lb-ft of torque. To put this in perspective, this beats the old car by 80 hp/37 lb-ft, the current GT3 RS by 200 hp, and the Turbo S Exclusive Series by 93 hp.

Like all other GT2s, this power is sent exclusively to the rear tires, in this case the widest tires ever to be fitted to a production 911 — 325/30 ZR21s. As is the case with the GT3 RS, the only transmission available is the venerable seven-speed PDK, a departure from the old GT2 RS’ six-speed manual transmission.

In exchange for a third pedal, the new car gains serious performance figures. 0-60 mph is dispatched in 2.7 seconds, 0-100 mph in 5.8 seconds, and 0-124 mph in 8.3 seconds. Be brave, and the GT2 won’t stop accelerating until it smacks into its 211 mph top speed. Keep in mind Porsche is almost always conservative with its quoted performance figures, so expect independent testing to reveal even stronger numbers.

Don’t worry, there’s all manner of go-fast hardware to keep it safe, including standard carbon ceramic brakes, aggressive aero, rear-wheel steering, and specialized traction and stability control. Like the GT3 RS, it’s lighter than most 911s, thanks to extensive use of carbon fiber and aluminum body panels. Around back, the titanium exhaust is unique to the GT2 RS, further shedding extra bulk, bringing the total down to 3,241 pounds.








Not enough? Buyers looking for that extra inch of asceticism can outfit their GT2 RS with the optional Weissach package. This adds more carbon fiber, titanium, and magnesium components to save an additional 40 pounds.

Shockingly, this isn’t a strictly limited model, unlike the previous car — Porsche will build as many as they can sell. Prices begin at $294,250, and only climb from there, especially with the $31,000 Weissach Package. Get your order in now, as deliveries begin in the first quarter of 2018.

The post 2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS Revealed at Goodwood appeared first on Automobile Magazine.

Source: http://ift.tt/LhoIaq

2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS Revealed at Goodwood

After we got a quick peek at a Microsoft preview and “drove” it in the new Forza Motorsports 7 demo at E3, the new 2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS bared all at this year’s Goodwood Festival of Speed. Don’t worry, it lives up to its name — with 700 hp from the 3.8-liter twin-turbo flat-six, the new 991.2 GT2 RS rightfully claims the title from the old 997.2 GT2 RS as the most powerful Porsche 911 ever put into production.

The new GT2 had some mighty large shoes to fill — namely, the lightened, exclusive, and boosted sneakers still occupied by the old car. Historically, Porsche reserves the GT2 badge for the most hardcore, fastest, and exclusive 911s to emerge from Stuttgart. We’ve enjoyed a GT2 variant from every 911 generation since the 993, and with the 991 entering its twilight years with no GT2, things were looking grim up to this point.

From the looks of the new car, we’re glad we were patient. It seems like Porsche vaulted over the regular, hum-drum GT2 and went straight for the RS model. Perhaps this will be de rigueur for future generations — Porsche also skipped the non-RS GT2 for the 2010-2012 997.2, opting to create the first GT2 RS instead.

The GT2 RS makes use of a highly modified, water-injected 3.8-liter twin-turbo flat-six from the Turbo S, now returning a stunning 700 hp and 553 lb-ft of torque. To put this in perspective, this beats the old car by 80 hp/37 lb-ft, the current GT3 RS by 200 hp, and the Turbo S Exclusive Series by 93 hp.

Like all other GT2s, this power is sent exclusively to the rear tires, in this case the widest tires ever to be fitted to a production 911 — 325/30 ZR21s. As is the case with the GT3 RS, the only transmission available is the venerable seven-speed PDK, a departure from the old GT2 RS’ six-speed manual transmission.

In exchange for a third pedal, the new car gains serious performance figures. 0-60 mph is dispatched in 2.7 seconds, 0-100 mph in 5.8 seconds, and 0-124 mph in 8.3 seconds. Be brave, and the GT2 won’t stop accelerating until it smacks into its 211 mph top speed. Keep in mind Porsche is almost always conservative with its quoted performance figures, so expect independent testing to reveal even stronger numbers.

Don’t worry, there’s all manner of go-fast hardware to keep it safe, including standard carbon ceramic brakes, aggressive aero, rear-wheel steering, and specialized traction and stability control. Like the GT3 RS, it’s lighter than most 911s, thanks to extensive use of carbon fiber and aluminum body panels. Around back, the titanium exhaust is unique to the GT2 RS, further shedding extra bulk, bringing the total down to 3,241 pounds.








Not enough? Buyers looking for that extra inch of asceticism can outfit their GT2 RS with the optional Weissach package. This adds more carbon fiber, titanium, and magnesium components to save an additional 40 pounds.

Shockingly, this isn’t a strictly limited model, unlike the previous car — Porsche will build as many as they can sell. Prices begin at $294,250, and only climb from there, especially with the $31,000 Weissach Package. Get your order in now, as deliveries begin in the first quarter of 2018.

The post 2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS Revealed at Goodwood appeared first on Automobile Magazine.

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