2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS Revealed at Goodwood

After we got a quick peek at a Microsoft preview and “drove” it in the new Forza Motorsports 7 demo at E3, the new 2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS bared all at this year’s Goodwood Festival of Speed. Don’t worry, it lives up to its name — with 700 hp from the 3.8-liter twin-turbo flat-six, the new 991.2 GT2 RS rightfully claims the title from the old 997.2 GT2 RS as the most powerful Porsche 911 ever put into production.

The new GT2 had some mighty large shoes to fill — namely, the lightened, exclusive, and boosted sneakers still occupied by the old car. Historically, Porsche reserves the GT2 badge for the most hardcore, fastest, and exclusive 911s to emerge from Stuttgart. We’ve enjoyed a GT2 variant from every 911 generation since the 993, and with the 991 entering its twilight years with no GT2, things were looking grim up to this point.

From the looks of the new car, we’re glad we were patient. It seems like Porsche vaulted over the regular, hum-drum GT2 and went straight for the RS model. Perhaps this will be de rigueur for future generations — Porsche also skipped the non-RS GT2 for the 2010-2012 997.2, opting to create the first GT2 RS instead.

The GT2 RS makes use of a highly modified, water-injected 3.8-liter twin-turbo flat-six from the Turbo S, now returning a stunning 700 hp and 553 lb-ft of torque. To put this in perspective, this beats the old car by 80 hp/37 lb-ft, the current GT3 RS by 200 hp, and the Turbo S Exclusive Series by 93 hp.

Like all other GT2s, this power is sent exclusively to the rear tires, in this case the widest tires ever to be fitted to a production 911 — 325/30 ZR21s. As is the case with the GT3 RS, the only transmission available is the venerable seven-speed PDK, a departure from the old GT2 RS’ six-speed manual transmission.

In exchange for a third pedal, the new car gains serious performance figures. 0-60 mph is dispatched in 2.7 seconds, 0-100 mph in 5.8 seconds, and 0-124 mph in 8.3 seconds. Be brave, and the GT2 won’t stop accelerating until it smacks into its 211 mph top speed. Keep in mind Porsche is almost always conservative with its quoted performance figures, so expect independent testing to reveal even stronger numbers.

Don’t worry, there’s all manner of go-fast hardware to keep it safe, including standard carbon ceramic brakes, aggressive aero, rear-wheel steering, and specialized traction and stability control. Like the GT3 RS, it’s lighter than most 911s, thanks to extensive use of carbon fiber and aluminum body panels. Around back, the titanium exhaust is unique to the GT2 RS, further shedding extra bulk, bringing the total down to 3,241 pounds.








Not enough? Buyers looking for that extra inch of asceticism can outfit their GT2 RS with the optional Weissach package. This adds more carbon fiber, titanium, and magnesium components to save an additional 40 pounds.

Shockingly, this isn’t a strictly limited model, unlike the previous car — Porsche will build as many as they can sell. Prices begin at $294,250, and only climb from there, especially with the $31,000 Weissach Package. Get your order in now, as deliveries begin in the first quarter of 2018.

The post 2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS Revealed at Goodwood appeared first on Automobile Magazine.

Source: http://ift.tt/LhoIaq

By Design: Range Rover Velar

With a half dozen model ranges available in Land Rover’s Range Rover stable, you would think there would be little need for the Velar, a completely new model named after the few original Range Rover prototypes made back in the ’60s. To keep the then-radical concept of a somewhat luxurious full-time all-wheel-drive wagon secret, one of Rover’s engineers created a fictitious car company and registered those 30-odd vehicles as Velars, a subterfuge honored almost 50 years later in this new model’s name. And if there might not be any absolute need for this model, there is certainly a desire for it by the company and its customers alike. It is seen by its purveyors as a particularly avant-garde design. I don’t see it that way, but I do see a carefully designed, quite surprisingly aerodynamic box with a lot of consumer appeal as a road car.

What was apparent to anyone admiring the car at the 2017 Geneva auto show, where it was first shown earlier this year, is that Gerry McGovern, the clever SUV specialist who heads design at Land Rover, has taken the Edmund Rumpler approach to aerodynamics. Rumpler’s almost century-old Tropfenwagen design had a severe vertical windshield profile but was a pure teardrop in plan view, apart from exposed wheels sticking out from the seven-passenger body. McGovern used the “fastest” windshield I can recall seeing on an SUV, but he also tapered the body inward toward the rear over the entire length of the passenger compartment from the A-pillar aft in both plan and profile.

In its formal sophistication, the Velar is the antithesis of the original Land Rover Defender, which ceased production last January after 68 years on the market and was almost surely the highest-drag, least-slippery passenger car in production during its lifetime. There’ll be a successor to the Defender sometime soon, but its shape is likely to completely reverse previous practice apart from having an aluminum body, as all Land Rovers did from 1948.

Even though it’s the most aerodynamically efficient model in Land Rover’s history, the Velar isn’t the most luxurious or prestigious Range Rover, nor is it the sportiest. But I think it’s the most serious and mature design in the entire company portfolio. It’s a product capable of prodigious off-road feats but clearly aimed toward on-road urban and suburban use. As is the Jaguar F-Pace with which it shares platform elements, it’s a sensible and economical way to extend Jaguar Land Rover’s industrial investment. The two base companies that could not stand on their own despite the many virtues of their cars seem to have come up with a winning hand under the apparently benevolent management of India’s Tata, which has let its staff do what it was able to achieve all along had it been properly guided. May this long continue.

A. The transverse radius across the top of the hood is just soft enough to satisfy European pedestrian safety requirements yet remain visually crisp.

B. The nicest bit of surface development on the exterior allows the top line to fade into the hood’s top, while the side profile crease dips to emphasize the fender profile.

C. The aerodynamically advantageous Kamm-like roof profile shows up nicely in this view.

D. The slight bevel below the windows runs all the way around the car to the opposite front fender, where it turns down into the daylight running lamp’s rear point.

E. Taillights repeat the odd little body side joggle seen on the front end and front doors.

F. This line is not dead straight but subtly arched upward from the upper ends of the lower grille.

G. A strictly horizontal line provides a datum reference for the graphic composition of the entire front end—ultimately quite simple and clean.

H. This unobtrusively protruding lip above the lower grille sets a baseline for the entire Velar, the only such element that’s easily visible.

I. Notice that the bottom of the body side paintwork is parallel to the top fender profile but sharply upswept with reference to the ground plane and base of the body structure.

J. Barely discernible is the blacked-out lower part of the body structure, parallel to the ground but highly skewed up at the rear at the paint intersection line.

1. The padded shelf carrying all the way across the instrument panel is so plain and so straightforward that you can admire the restraint exhibited in the understated interior design. It represents true elegance.

2. Putting the steering wheel controls in separate panels seems like a good idea, easily apprehended by a new driver and easy to live with once you’re accustomed to it.

3. Maybe this 10-inch trapezoidal outline is too understated. It’s frankly rather boring.

4. The HVAC panel is admirably clear—easy to understand and manipulate.

5. The three-part instrument cowl also represents traditional British understatement.

This must be the fastest, most extreme windshield angle of any SUV today, extra sporty and highly agreeable as it tempers the boxiness typical of such vehicles.

6. Nose the Velar up to a wall, and this transverse flange will be the part that touches.

7. The Velar’s wheels look amply strong but are styled much more for the road than for outback dirt trails, a nice compromise between the vehicle’s different roles.

8. Flush door handles are a touch of luxury unexpected on an SUV.

9. A huge dark volume under the tail, augmented by an upward kink in the side treatment, slims the painted portion of the rear body to sedanlike proportions.

10. There’s no pretense of the Velar being a sublimated delivery truck. The internal volume is voluntarily reduced to give a sporty line, and the roof is extended for aerodynamics.

A. Seen from above, the front end is almost as round as a Porsche 918, with similar penetration benefits.

B. From about here, the body shrinks in height and width as it flows rearward.

11. The generous dimensions of the outside rearview mirrors are an admirable part of what is meant to be a very practical vehicle.

12. The band that carries the taillights and the badge artfully bisects the upper two-thirds of the tail, providing a very clean graphic composition with a strong lateral line on its upper edge.

13. Unfortunately, the liftover height for the rear compartment is quite high, a practical problem with most SUVs.

14. Exhaust outlets are nicely shaped, essentially separated from the body, visually even more than physically.

15. One of the most original ideas on the Velar is this arched section carrying the exhaust tips completely away from the painted body panels, isolated in a dark mass below.

16. That dark mass is nonetheless artfully shaped to control the flux of air at the rear of the body form for aerodynamic efficiency.








































The post By Design: Range Rover Velar appeared first on Automobile Magazine.

Source: http://ift.tt/LhoIaq

By Design: Range Rover Velar

With a half dozen model ranges available in Land Rover’s Range Rover stable, you would think there would be little need for the Velar, a completely new model named after the few original Range Rover prototypes made back in the ’60s. To keep the then-radical concept of a somewhat luxurious full-time all-wheel-drive wagon secret, one of Rover’s engineers created a fictitious car company and registered those 30-odd vehicles as Velars, a subterfuge honored almost 50 years later in this new model’s name. And if there might not be any absolute need for this model, there is certainly a desire for it by the company and its customers alike. It is seen by its purveyors as a particularly avant-garde design. I don’t see it that way, but I do see a carefully designed, quite surprisingly aerodynamic box with a lot of consumer appeal as a road car.

What was apparent to anyone admiring the car at the 2017 Geneva auto show, where it was first shown earlier this year, is that Gerry McGovern, the clever SUV specialist who heads design at Land Rover, has taken the Edmund Rumpler approach to aerodynamics. Rumpler’s almost century-old Tropfenwagen design had a severe vertical windshield profile but was a pure teardrop in plan view, apart from exposed wheels sticking out from the seven-passenger body. McGovern used the “fastest” windshield I can recall seeing on an SUV, but he also tapered the body inward toward the rear over the entire length of the passenger compartment from the A-pillar aft in both plan and profile.

In its formal sophistication, the Velar is the antithesis of the original Land Rover Defender, which ceased production last January after 68 years on the market and was almost surely the highest-drag, least-slippery passenger car in production during its lifetime. There’ll be a successor to the Defender sometime soon, but its shape is likely to completely reverse previous practice apart from having an aluminum body, as all Land Rovers did from 1948.

Even though it’s the most aerodynamically efficient model in Land Rover’s history, the Velar isn’t the most luxurious or prestigious Range Rover, nor is it the sportiest. But I think it’s the most serious and mature design in the entire company portfolio. It’s a product capable of prodigious off-road feats but clearly aimed toward on-road urban and suburban use. As is the Jaguar F-Pace with which it shares platform elements, it’s a sensible and economical way to extend Jaguar Land Rover’s industrial investment. The two base companies that could not stand on their own despite the many virtues of their cars seem to have come up with a winning hand under the apparently benevolent management of India’s Tata, which has let its staff do what it was able to achieve all along had it been properly guided. May this long continue.

A. The transverse radius across the top of the hood is just soft enough to satisfy European pedestrian safety requirements yet remain visually crisp.

B. The nicest bit of surface development on the exterior allows the top line to fade into the hood’s top, while the side profile crease dips to emphasize the fender profile.

C. The aerodynamically advantageous Kamm-like roof profile shows up nicely in this view.

D. The slight bevel below the windows runs all the way around the car to the opposite front fender, where it turns down into the daylight running lamp’s rear point.

E. Taillights repeat the odd little body side joggle seen on the front end and front doors.

F. This line is not dead straight but subtly arched upward from the upper ends of the lower grille.

G. A strictly horizontal line provides a datum reference for the graphic composition of the entire front end—ultimately quite simple and clean.

H. This unobtrusively protruding lip above the lower grille sets a baseline for the entire Velar, the only such element that’s easily visible.

I. Notice that the bottom of the body side paintwork is parallel to the top fender profile but sharply upswept with reference to the ground plane and base of the body structure.

J. Barely discernible is the blacked-out lower part of the body structure, parallel to the ground but highly skewed up at the rear at the paint intersection line.

1. The padded shelf carrying all the way across the instrument panel is so plain and so straightforward that you can admire the restraint exhibited in the understated interior design. It represents true elegance.

2. Putting the steering wheel controls in separate panels seems like a good idea, easily apprehended by a new driver and easy to live with once you’re accustomed to it.

3. Maybe this 10-inch trapezoidal outline is too understated. It’s frankly rather boring.

4. The HVAC panel is admirably clear—easy to understand and manipulate.

5. The three-part instrument cowl also represents traditional British understatement.

This must be the fastest, most extreme windshield angle of any SUV today, extra sporty and highly agreeable as it tempers the boxiness typical of such vehicles.

6. Nose the Velar up to a wall, and this transverse flange will be the part that touches.

7. The Velar’s wheels look amply strong but are styled much more for the road than for outback dirt trails, a nice compromise between the vehicle’s different roles.

8. Flush door handles are a touch of luxury unexpected on an SUV.

9. A huge dark volume under the tail, augmented by an upward kink in the side treatment, slims the painted portion of the rear body to sedanlike proportions.

10. There’s no pretense of the Velar being a sublimated delivery truck. The internal volume is voluntarily reduced to give a sporty line, and the roof is extended for aerodynamics.

A. Seen from above, the front end is almost as round as a Porsche 918, with similar penetration benefits.

B. From about here, the body shrinks in height and width as it flows rearward.

11. The generous dimensions of the outside rearview mirrors are an admirable part of what is meant to be a very practical vehicle.

12. The band that carries the taillights and the badge artfully bisects the upper two-thirds of the tail, providing a very clean graphic composition with a strong lateral line on its upper edge.

13. Unfortunately, the liftover height for the rear compartment is quite high, a practical problem with most SUVs.

14. Exhaust outlets are nicely shaped, essentially separated from the body, visually even more than physically.

15. One of the most original ideas on the Velar is this arched section carrying the exhaust tips completely away from the painted body panels, isolated in a dark mass below.

16. That dark mass is nonetheless artfully shaped to control the flux of air at the rear of the body form for aerodynamic efficiency.








































The post By Design: Range Rover Velar appeared first on Automobile Magazine.

Source: http://ift.tt/LhoIaq

By Design: Range Rover Velar

With a half dozen model ranges available in Land Rover’s Range Rover stable, you would think there would be little need for the Velar, a completely new model named after the few original Range Rover prototypes made back in the ’60s. To keep the then-radical concept of a somewhat luxurious full-time all-wheel-drive wagon secret, one of Rover’s engineers created a fictitious car company and registered those 30-odd vehicles as Velars, a subterfuge honored almost 50 years later in this new model’s name. And if there might not be any absolute need for this model, there is certainly a desire for it by the company and its customers alike. It is seen by its purveyors as a particularly avant-garde design. I don’t see it that way, but I do see a carefully designed, quite surprisingly aerodynamic box with a lot of consumer appeal as a road car.

What was apparent to anyone admiring the car at the 2017 Geneva auto show, where it was first shown earlier this year, is that Gerry McGovern, the clever SUV specialist who heads design at Land Rover, has taken the Edmund Rumpler approach to aerodynamics. Rumpler’s almost century-old Tropfenwagen design had a severe vertical windshield profile but was a pure teardrop in plan view, apart from exposed wheels sticking out from the seven-passenger body. McGovern used the “fastest” windshield I can recall seeing on an SUV, but he also tapered the body inward toward the rear over the entire length of the passenger compartment from the A-pillar aft in both plan and profile.

In its formal sophistication, the Velar is the antithesis of the original Land Rover Defender, which ceased production last January after 68 years on the market and was almost surely the highest-drag, least-slippery passenger car in production during its lifetime. There’ll be a successor to the Defender sometime soon, but its shape is likely to completely reverse previous practice apart from having an aluminum body, as all Land Rovers did from 1948.

Even though it’s the most aerodynamically efficient model in Land Rover’s history, the Velar isn’t the most luxurious or prestigious Range Rover, nor is it the sportiest. But I think it’s the most serious and mature design in the entire company portfolio. It’s a product capable of prodigious off-road feats but clearly aimed toward on-road urban and suburban use. As is the Jaguar F-Pace with which it shares platform elements, it’s a sensible and economical way to extend Jaguar Land Rover’s industrial investment. The two base companies that could not stand on their own despite the many virtues of their cars seem to have come up with a winning hand under the apparently benevolent management of India’s Tata, which has let its staff do what it was able to achieve all along had it been properly guided. May this long continue.

A. The transverse radius across the top of the hood is just soft enough to satisfy European pedestrian safety requirements yet remain visually crisp.

B. The nicest bit of surface development on the exterior allows the top line to fade into the hood’s top, while the side profile crease dips to emphasize the fender profile.

C. The aerodynamically advantageous Kamm-like roof profile shows up nicely in this view.

D. The slight bevel below the windows runs all the way around the car to the opposite front fender, where it turns down into the daylight running lamp’s rear point.

E. Taillights repeat the odd little body side joggle seen on the front end and front doors.

F. This line is not dead straight but subtly arched upward from the upper ends of the lower grille.

G. A strictly horizontal line provides a datum reference for the graphic composition of the entire front end—ultimately quite simple and clean.

H. This unobtrusively protruding lip above the lower grille sets a baseline for the entire Velar, the only such element that’s easily visible.

I. Notice that the bottom of the body side paintwork is parallel to the top fender profile but sharply upswept with reference to the ground plane and base of the body structure.

J. Barely discernible is the blacked-out lower part of the body structure, parallel to the ground but highly skewed up at the rear at the paint intersection line.

1. The padded shelf carrying all the way across the instrument panel is so plain and so straightforward that you can admire the restraint exhibited in the understated interior design. It represents true elegance.

2. Putting the steering wheel controls in separate panels seems like a good idea, easily apprehended by a new driver and easy to live with once you’re accustomed to it.

3. Maybe this 10-inch trapezoidal outline is too understated. It’s frankly rather boring.

4. The HVAC panel is admirably clear—easy to understand and manipulate.

5. The three-part instrument cowl also represents traditional British understatement.

This must be the fastest, most extreme windshield angle of any SUV today, extra sporty and highly agreeable as it tempers the boxiness typical of such vehicles.

6. Nose the Velar up to a wall, and this transverse flange will be the part that touches.

7. The Velar’s wheels look amply strong but are styled much more for the road than for outback dirt trails, a nice compromise between the vehicle’s different roles.

8. Flush door handles are a touch of luxury unexpected on an SUV.

9. A huge dark volume under the tail, augmented by an upward kink in the side treatment, slims the painted portion of the rear body to sedanlike proportions.

10. There’s no pretense of the Velar being a sublimated delivery truck. The internal volume is voluntarily reduced to give a sporty line, and the roof is extended for aerodynamics.

A. Seen from above, the front end is almost as round as a Porsche 918, with similar penetration benefits.

B. From about here, the body shrinks in height and width as it flows rearward.

11. The generous dimensions of the outside rearview mirrors are an admirable part of what is meant to be a very practical vehicle.

12. The band that carries the taillights and the badge artfully bisects the upper two-thirds of the tail, providing a very clean graphic composition with a strong lateral line on its upper edge.

13. Unfortunately, the liftover height for the rear compartment is quite high, a practical problem with most SUVs.

14. Exhaust outlets are nicely shaped, essentially separated from the body, visually even more than physically.

15. One of the most original ideas on the Velar is this arched section carrying the exhaust tips completely away from the painted body panels, isolated in a dark mass below.

16. That dark mass is nonetheless artfully shaped to control the flux of air at the rear of the body form for aerodynamic efficiency.








































The post By Design: Range Rover Velar appeared first on Automobile Magazine.

Source: http://ift.tt/LhoIaq

By Design: Range Rover Velar

With a half dozen model ranges available in Land Rover’s Range Rover stable, you would think there would be little need for the Velar, a completely new model named after the few original Range Rover prototypes made back in the ’60s. To keep the then-radical concept of a somewhat luxurious full-time all-wheel-drive wagon secret, one of Rover’s engineers created a fictitious car company and registered those 30-odd vehicles as Velars, a subterfuge honored almost 50 years later in this new model’s name. And if there might not be any absolute need for this model, there is certainly a desire for it by the company and its customers alike. It is seen by its purveyors as a particularly avant-garde design. I don’t see it that way, but I do see a carefully designed, quite surprisingly aerodynamic box with a lot of consumer appeal as a road car.

What was apparent to anyone admiring the car at the 2017 Geneva auto show, where it was first shown earlier this year, is that Gerry McGovern, the clever SUV specialist who heads design at Land Rover, has taken the Edmund Rumpler approach to aerodynamics. Rumpler’s almost century-old Tropfenwagen design had a severe vertical windshield profile but was a pure teardrop in plan view, apart from exposed wheels sticking out from the seven-passenger body. McGovern used the “fastest” windshield I can recall seeing on an SUV, but he also tapered the body inward toward the rear over the entire length of the passenger compartment from the A-pillar aft in both plan and profile.

In its formal sophistication, the Velar is the antithesis of the original Land Rover Defender, which ceased production last January after 68 years on the market and was almost surely the highest-drag, least-slippery passenger car in production during its lifetime. There’ll be a successor to the Defender sometime soon, but its shape is likely to completely reverse previous practice apart from having an aluminum body, as all Land Rovers did from 1948.

Even though it’s the most aerodynamically efficient model in Land Rover’s history, the Velar isn’t the most luxurious or prestigious Range Rover, nor is it the sportiest. But I think it’s the most serious and mature design in the entire company portfolio. It’s a product capable of prodigious off-road feats but clearly aimed toward on-road urban and suburban use. As is the Jaguar F-Pace with which it shares platform elements, it’s a sensible and economical way to extend Jaguar Land Rover’s industrial investment. The two base companies that could not stand on their own despite the many virtues of their cars seem to have come up with a winning hand under the apparently benevolent management of India’s Tata, which has let its staff do what it was able to achieve all along had it been properly guided. May this long continue.

A. The transverse radius across the top of the hood is just soft enough to satisfy European pedestrian safety requirements yet remain visually crisp.

B. The nicest bit of surface development on the exterior allows the top line to fade into the hood’s top, while the side profile crease dips to emphasize the fender profile.

C. The aerodynamically advantageous Kamm-like roof profile shows up nicely in this view.

D. The slight bevel below the windows runs all the way around the car to the opposite front fender, where it turns down into the daylight running lamp’s rear point.

E. Taillights repeat the odd little body side joggle seen on the front end and front doors.

F. This line is not dead straight but subtly arched upward from the upper ends of the lower grille.

G. A strictly horizontal line provides a datum reference for the graphic composition of the entire front end—ultimately quite simple and clean.

H. This unobtrusively protruding lip above the lower grille sets a baseline for the entire Velar, the only such element that’s easily visible.

I. Notice that the bottom of the body side paintwork is parallel to the top fender profile but sharply upswept with reference to the ground plane and base of the body structure.

J. Barely discernible is the blacked-out lower part of the body structure, parallel to the ground but highly skewed up at the rear at the paint intersection line.

1. The padded shelf carrying all the way across the instrument panel is so plain and so straightforward that you can admire the restraint exhibited in the understated interior design. It represents true elegance.

2. Putting the steering wheel controls in separate panels seems like a good idea, easily apprehended by a new driver and easy to live with once you’re accustomed to it.

3. Maybe this 10-inch trapezoidal outline is too understated. It’s frankly rather boring.

4. The HVAC panel is admirably clear—easy to understand and manipulate.

5. The three-part instrument cowl also represents traditional British understatement.

This must be the fastest, most extreme windshield angle of any SUV today, extra sporty and highly agreeable as it tempers the boxiness typical of such vehicles.

6. Nose the Velar up to a wall, and this transverse flange will be the part that touches.

7. The Velar’s wheels look amply strong but are styled much more for the road than for outback dirt trails, a nice compromise between the vehicle’s different roles.

8. Flush door handles are a touch of luxury unexpected on an SUV.

9. A huge dark volume under the tail, augmented by an upward kink in the side treatment, slims the painted portion of the rear body to sedanlike proportions.

10. There’s no pretense of the Velar being a sublimated delivery truck. The internal volume is voluntarily reduced to give a sporty line, and the roof is extended for aerodynamics.

A. Seen from above, the front end is almost as round as a Porsche 918, with similar penetration benefits.

B. From about here, the body shrinks in height and width as it flows rearward.

11. The generous dimensions of the outside rearview mirrors are an admirable part of what is meant to be a very practical vehicle.

12. The band that carries the taillights and the badge artfully bisects the upper two-thirds of the tail, providing a very clean graphic composition with a strong lateral line on its upper edge.

13. Unfortunately, the liftover height for the rear compartment is quite high, a practical problem with most SUVs.

14. Exhaust outlets are nicely shaped, essentially separated from the body, visually even more than physically.

15. One of the most original ideas on the Velar is this arched section carrying the exhaust tips completely away from the painted body panels, isolated in a dark mass below.

16. That dark mass is nonetheless artfully shaped to control the flux of air at the rear of the body form for aerodynamic efficiency.








































The post By Design: Range Rover Velar appeared first on Automobile Magazine.

Source: http://ift.tt/LhoIaq

First Look: Trek Emonda SLR Disc

In Trek’s stable of race-oriented bicycles comprised of the Madone, Domane, and Émonda, the latter is the lightweight all-rounder that complements the aero Madone and rough-road Domane

At the time of its introduction in 2014, Trek claimed the Emonda was the lightest production frame in the world. Capable of being built to an astoundingly low 10.9 lbs complete (sans pedals) is was a rim-brake equipped wonder of low weight with no rider weight limit. It also provided an exceptional ride, garnering praise from the media at large and winning a Bicycling Editor’s choice award in 2017 for the Émonda SLR 8 Race Shop Limited, the same bike available to Trek Segafredo riders and consumers alike.  

RELATED: How to Watch the Tour de France

For 2018, Trek built on their philosophy of lightweight-for-all with two new models: the SL, a price-conscious model based on the current (2017) Émonda SLR and built with 500series OCLV carbon that supersedes the current introductory S models; and a brand-new-from-the-ground up SLR that shaves weight and offers incredible ride characteristics for any bike, let alone one so light. Both variants will be available in rim or disc models. 

ÉMONDA SLR:

The SLR is Trek’s flagship offering in the line. It will be available in H1, Trek’s longer, lower, race oriented fit, and H2, with a slightly shorter reach than the H1 and a taller head tube. Both bikes will be constructed of Trek’s proprietary 700 OCLV carbon. Weights for both frames are a claimed 640 grams (Rim, H1, size: 56cm) and 665g (Disc, H1, size: 56cm).  For comparison, the previous Émonda was 690g.  

duo trap emonda
Bicycling

All the proprietary tech of the current Émonda is retained, including the E2 head tube (which maximizes strength without adding weight) BB90, a ride-tuned seatmast and Duo Trap speed/cadence sensors in the left chainstay. The rim version relies on Bontrager Speedstop Pro brakes directly mounted to the frame in traditional fork seat stay positions.
 
The only difference between the disc and rim frames is co-molded dropouts with aluminum inserts, to carry the direct-mount style calipers and to capture the thru axles. Rear spacing is 142×12 while the fork sees a 12mm thru axle. 

Check out the previous Emonda:

The Émonda will be available in both men’s and women’s models with the only difference being touch points and paint schemes. Riders who want a truly custom bike can take advantage of Trek’s Project 1 program to pick their own paint job and component spec. The SL model with H2 geometry is available in 44-62cm frames.  SLR with H1 runs  50-62cm.

Trek’s aim was to craft a purpose-built all-around road bike with a simple goal: Improve ride quality and make the lightest lighter. It also needed to hold up, with no rider weight limit and a lifetime warranty.  

trek emonda
Bicycling

To that end, they used computer modeling to identify ideal tube shapes. As OCLV continues to evolve, the carbon fiber pieces are getting smaller and more optimized, which allows Trek to focus on ever-smaller areas of the frame and continue to pare down weight. Trek claims they made hundreds of working model frames before they arrived at the final product. 

Trek also wanted the Émonda to have more tire clearance, up to 28mm on the rim version and a claimed 30mm (though it looks like larger 32mm tires might fit our tester), on the disc version. 

Pricing for the Émonda range starts at $1579.99 for the base model Émonda SL Disc FS and tops out at $10,999.99 for the Émonda SLR 9.

emonda disc brake
Bicycling

The Ride: 

The new Émonda is poised to be an instant classic. I tested the Émonda SLR disc in H2 fit over a couple days riding around Trek’s HQ in Madison, and just received the same bike here at home for long-term testing. The new bike delivers on Trek’s promises; it’s soft when you need it to be (riding rumbly broken roads, for example) and stiff under power when climbing or sprinting. 

The H2 fit is generous, putting riders in a position that spans comfort and efficiency well. With a slammed stem it was easy to get to a race position, and general trundling around wasn’t so stretched that I couldn’t take in the scenery. 

RELATED: Why You Should Invest in a Bike Fit this Season

Handling-wise, the bike is super sharp. It benefits from a balanced feel that lets you take advantage of hip steer in tight chicanes for an effortless ability to carve lines at supersonic speeds. When stretched out and really giving it some stick, the Émonda did an admirable job of allowing you to lay down the watts. For the pure sprinter, the bike will get you to the line— but a Madone or similarly stiff chassis may be your better choice, as the (very) slightly springy ride of the Émonda may leave you wanting of those last few watts. 

emonda disc brake
Bicycling

But consider the ethereally light weight of the bike, and its all-rounder nature may be inconsequential.  On our scales the fully built bike—with pedals and cages, in 54cm, with Dura Ace 9100, Aeolus 3 carbon clinchers and 28mm Bontrager R3 Hardcase Lite 28mm tires— weighs in at a scant 15.6 lbs. 

Stay tuned for a longer-term review at Bicycling.com or in print at Bicycling magazine (Subscribe here!)

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First Look: Specialized Tarmac SL6

The Specialized Tarmac SL6 is a classic understated beauty— but look a little closer and you’ll find it’s the product of painstaking innovation. Still poised as Specialized’s signature race machine, and with a refined carbon layup and aerodynamic tweaks, 2018’s iteration is lighter, faster and more rideable than ever. (Make this your fastest season ever with Maximum Overload for Cyclists!)

To start, the brand fine-tuned the carbon layups, going from 350 pieces to 500 and virtually eliminating overlapping. The Tarmac also does away with individual internal cable routing in the bottom bracket in favor of a lighter, separate, internal plastic sleeve.  Altogether this shaves 200 grams from the previous Tarmac frame, putting a size 56 frame at a 733 grams. 

tarmac dropped stays
Photograph courtesy of Specialized

Specialized also added some aerodynamic tweaks, most notably the dropped seat stays, borrowed from the Venge ViAS and carried over into the Roubaix and even the 2018 Allez and Diverge. The lower position helps the stays “hide” from the wind without sacrificing stiffness. The D-shaped seatpost and seat tube balance aerodynamics with ride feel, using a progressive carbon layup to increase stiffness near the bottom bracket and compliance closer to the seat. 

The Tarmac also gets a refined fork shape, which is dependent on the size of the bike to create consistency in stiffness and handling. The head-tube bearings also move an inch and a half lower to bring the fork up into the headtube, drop the crown and decrease the overall profile of the front of the bike. Combined, Specialized claims these aero touches make the Tarmac a whopping 40 seconds faster over 40k, compared to other “superlight” bikes on the market. 

A close up look at the Specialized Ruby:

For 2018 the Amira women’s bikes are absorbed into the Tarmac line, at least at the S-Works and Expert levels. Specialized analyzed over 40,000 data points from bike fits gathered with partner Retül to paint a more accurate picture of the positioning and anatomy of male and female riders. Their conclusion was that riders want much of the same handling and performance, regardless of their gender— so the Tarmac WMN bikes are identical to the men’s, differing only in paint and touch point components like the seat and bars. Amira bikes will carry over from last year in the SL4 Sport and Comp levels.  

RELATED: 8 Awesome Women’s Road Bikes for 2017

The Ultra Light Men’s Tarmac with lightweight paint, reflective logo, and Dura-Ace Di2 goes for $10,500, and will be available in a limited run of 500 bikes. The S-Works Tarmac with Dura-Ace Di2 and Roval CLX50 wheels will cost $10,000 for both men and women, and comes in at $4,250 for just the frameset. Mens and Women’s Expert versions will run you $4,000, and come kitted out with Ultegra and Roval SLX 24 wheels. And if black isn’t your color, the S-Works comes with some considerably less understated paint options. Think neon and camo. 

specialized tarmac on the road
Photograph courtesy of Specialized

Ride Impressions:

We got to test the Tarmac S-Works in the rolling hills of New Jersey on a hot June day. I grabbed a 52 (I’m usually between a 52 and 54), stuck a 110 stem on, and immediately forgot about the bike. 

That’s a good thing. The Tarmac feels absolutely natural under you, in a way that doesn’t exactly call attention to itself. Most of my thoughts while riding were about hammering up a climb, or tucking in behind a wheel, or admiring some flowers— and looking back, that’s pretty unique for a bike I’d only just thrown a leg over for the first time.

RELATED: Tom Boonen’s Tricked-Out Retirement Present from Specialized 

The Tarmac does a wonderful job of feeling solid without edging into sleepy. You immediately sense that you can trust it. Whether you’re descending in the drops or sprinting out of the saddle, the wheels stay firmly planted and every watt seems to go into forward motion. 

It also doesn’t feel light, and that’s not to say that it doesn’t feel efficient. It just lacks that deflective, twitchy feel you sometimes get with ultra-light frames. I didn’t feel like I needed to baby it, or do anything gingerly. The Tarmac just seemed to want to go faster; all the time. 

Overall I finished the ride feeling like the Tarmac is an ideal race weapon and a great all-arounder for anyone who simply enjoys going fast. Look for the full review coming soon.

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New 2018 911 GT2 RS With 700 HP, Rear-Wheel Drive, Race-Bred Chassis, And Rear Axle Steering

The fastest and most powerful street-legal 911 model ever is ready for launch: The new 2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS is celebrating its official world premiere at the Goodwood Festival of Speed in the ?K from June 30th to July 2nd. At the heart of this high-performance sports car is a 700-horsepower twin-turbo flat-six engine. Weighing in at 3,241 pounds with a full tank of fuel, the lightweight two-seater accelerates from zero to 60 miles per hour in 2.7 seconds. The new 911 GT2 RS can reach a top track speed of 211 miles per hour, and it surpasses the 2011 911 GT2 RS by 80 horsepower. The 2018 911 GT2 RS delivers 553 lb.-ft. of torque, an increase of 37 lb.-ft. compared to the previous 911 GT2 RS.

New 2018 911 GT2 RS With 700 HP, Rear-Wheel Drive, Race-Bred Chassis, And Rear Axle Steering originally appeared on Conceptcarz.com on Fri, 30 Jun 2017 14:25:37 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Triumph Rocket III: A Satirical Inside Look

Here we have an unmistakably British satirical video about the making of the Triumph Rocket III. The video appears to have been commissioned by Triumph back in 2007, and it’s sure to raise a smile on the face of gearheads who appreciate dry English humor. Witness how engineers added its center of gravity, an engine grown from an embryo, and power being dropped in by the spoonful to create Triumph’s XL cruiser.

 

Triumph Rocket III: A Satirical Inside Look appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

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