2017 Lamborghini Huracan Performante Hits the Track on Ignition

Lamborghini took the already-stellar Huracán supercar and turned it into a record-breaking track weapon called the Performante. It’s definitely quick, but does it deliver the behind-the-wheel thrills of the original? Host Jonny Lieberman finds out on this episode of Ignition.

The 2017 Lamborghini Huracán Performante uses the same 5.2-liter V-10 as the standard model, but gets a power bump to 631 hp and 443 lb-ft of torque – up 29 hp and 30 lb-ft. The Performante also gets a revised seven-speed dual-clutch transmission, reprogrammed all-wheel-drive system, new aero features, and specially tuned magnetic shocks. It’s about 100 pounds lighter than a normal Huracán thanks to Forged Carbon composite parts. The Performante’s big aerodynamic party trick is its patented Aerodynamica Lamborghini Attiva (ALA) system. In the video, Lieberman explains how ALA differs from active aero systems on other supercars. ALA allows the Performante to have a fixed rear wing, and opens and closes flaps in the body to control drag and downforce. To demonstrate how this system works, Lieberman takes the Performante around Italy’s famed Imola circuit.

On the track, Lieberman finds that these improvements work in concert to create something that’s very different from your run-of-the-mill Huracán. But is the current fastest production car around the Nürburgring also a hoot to drive? Find out in the full episode below.























The post 2017 Lamborghini Huracan Performante Hits the Track on Ignition appeared first on Motor Trend.

Source: http://ift.tt/JPPTFe

My Brand New Tire has a Nail in it!

Dear MOby,

Right, so, on the way home from having new Dunlop Q3 Pluses mounted on my almost-new 2005 GSX-R1000, I ran over a flathead nail which is still lodged right in the middle of the rear tread. I’ve read about plugging tires on MO, but is there a better way since this tire is brand new? Somebody told me I could just put a tube inside, even though it’s a tubeless tire? What’s the deal?

Holey of Holies
Burbank, CA


Do not feel like the Lone Ranger, Holey, this happens to the best of us. They actually do make tubes to fit your 190/50-ZR17 rear, but you definitely don’t want to go that route unless you plan on never going faster than about 70 mph again. Heat is the enemy of the rear tire on a bike as powerful as yours, and an inner tube rubbing against the inside of the tire as it flexes – and radials flex more than the old bias-ply tires – especially at higher speeds, could cause nasty consequences should the tube suddenly decide to exhale all at once.

When tubes go bad: When the one in this Indian Chief’s rear tire gave up the ghost a few years ago at 80 mph, and exited via the tire tread, it was not a pleasant experience.

When tubes go bad: When the one in this Indian Chief’s rear tire gave up the ghost a few years ago at 80 mph, and exited via the tire tread, it was not a pleasant experience.

We’ve had lots of fun with tire plugs, which are really only supposed to be an on-the-road fix to get you to a proper repair facility. If your tire was nearing the end of its life, plugs aren’t a bad way to go, but again, we wouldn’t want to, or advise you to, use all your bike’s power and speed on a plugged tire. Or even most of it.

There is another way, though, and it’ll make you and Dunlop both happy: the permanent patch from the inside. Here’s the word straight from the horse’s (Dunlop’s) website:


Some punctures in motorcycle tires may be repaired.

Dunlop recommends only permanent plug-patch repairs of small (maximum 1/4-inch diameter) tread-area punctures from within the dismounted tire by a qualified tire repair shop or motorcycle dealer. Never perform an exterior repair and never use an inner tube as a substitute for a proper repair. Speed should not exceed 50 mph for the first 24 hours after repair, and the repaired tire should never be used over 75 mph. Advise your customer to check inflation pressure after tire cools for at least three (3) hours following run-in, or sooner if air loss is suspected. See the Dunlop Service Advisory for additional motorcycle tubeless-tire repair information. Follow the same repair procedures for tires on rims requiring tube replacement. The repairer is solely responsible for the repair and any instructions to the repaired-tire user.

Advise your customers that no form of temporary repair should be attempted because secondary damage caused by a penetrating object may not be detected and tire or tube deflation may occur at a later date.

Dunlop does not recommend the use of liquid sealants. These are a form of temporary repair, and they may adversely affect ply material and mask secondary damage caused by a penetrating object. Advise your customers that reliance upon sealants can result in sudden tire failure and accident.


Finding a dealer willing to perform the patch operation can be hit and miss, but most independent bike shops will be happy to permanently patch your tire – and will have enough experience to recommend that you don’t patch it if they spot unexpected internal damage.

Definitely keep an eye on the hole and on your tire pressure afterward, but you’ll probably find your new Q3 Plus is as good as new.


By hitting the Return, Escape or Power Off button, you hereby accept that you’re gullible enough to believe almost anything, and absolve Motorcycle.com and all its employees, contractors, assignees and livestock, its parent company, adjacent buildings, and the city of Toronto, ON, Canada, every manufacturer ever to make anything remotely involved with motorcycles, all 50 states and the District of Columbia, President Trump but not his staff, of anything the least bit negative to include chipped nails, bloating and water weight gain or death, that occurs as a result of our advice or implication of said advice, in perpetuity and forever. We mean it.

Send your moto-related questions to AskMOAnything@motorcycle.com.

Recent Ask MOs:
Why Are Touring Bikes So Damn Big?
Ask MO Anything: Is New Or Used Better?
What’s The Best Way To Ride Safe On Busy Freeways?

My Brand New Tire has a Nail in it! appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

Source: http://ift.tt/Xzx9iy

My Brand New Tire has a Nail in it!

Dear MOby,

Right, so, on the way home from having new Dunlop Q3 Pluses mounted on my almost-new 2005 GSX-R1000, I ran over a flathead nail which is still lodged right in the middle of the rear tread. I’ve read about plugging tires on MO, but is there a better way since this tire is brand new? Somebody told me I could just put a tube inside, even though it’s a tubeless tire? What’s the deal?

Holey of Holies
Burbank, CA


Do not feel like the Lone Ranger, Holey, this happens to the best of us. They actually do make tubes to fit your 190/50-ZR17 rear, but you definitely don’t want to go that route unless you plan on never going faster than about 70 mph again. Heat is the enemy of the rear tire on a bike as powerful as yours, and an inner tube rubbing against the inside of the tire as it flexes – and radials flex more than the old bias-ply tires – especially at higher speeds, could cause nasty consequences should the tube suddenly decide to exhale all at once.

When tubes go bad: When the one in this Indian Chief’s rear tire gave up the ghost a few years ago at 80 mph, and exited via the tire tread, it was not a pleasant experience.

When tubes go bad: When the one in this Indian Chief’s rear tire gave up the ghost a few years ago at 80 mph, and exited via the tire tread, it was not a pleasant experience.

We’ve had lots of fun with tire plugs, which are really only supposed to be an on-the-road fix to get you to a proper repair facility. If your tire was nearing the end of its life, plugs aren’t a bad way to go, but again, we wouldn’t want to, or advise you to, use all your bike’s power and speed on a plugged tire. Or even most of it.

There is another way, though, and it’ll make you and Dunlop both happy: the permanent patch from the inside. Here’s the word straight from the horse’s (Dunlop’s) website:


Some punctures in motorcycle tires may be repaired.

Dunlop recommends only permanent plug-patch repairs of small (maximum 1/4-inch diameter) tread-area punctures from within the dismounted tire by a qualified tire repair shop or motorcycle dealer. Never perform an exterior repair and never use an inner tube as a substitute for a proper repair. Speed should not exceed 50 mph for the first 24 hours after repair, and the repaired tire should never be used over 75 mph. Advise your customer to check inflation pressure after tire cools for at least three (3) hours following run-in, or sooner if air loss is suspected. See the Dunlop Service Advisory for additional motorcycle tubeless-tire repair information. Follow the same repair procedures for tires on rims requiring tube replacement. The repairer is solely responsible for the repair and any instructions to the repaired-tire user.

Advise your customers that no form of temporary repair should be attempted because secondary damage caused by a penetrating object may not be detected and tire or tube deflation may occur at a later date.

Dunlop does not recommend the use of liquid sealants. These are a form of temporary repair, and they may adversely affect ply material and mask secondary damage caused by a penetrating object. Advise your customers that reliance upon sealants can result in sudden tire failure and accident.


Finding a dealer willing to perform the patch operation can be hit and miss, but most independent bike shops will be happy to permanently patch your tire – and will have enough experience to recommend that you don’t patch it if they spot unexpected internal damage.

Definitely keep an eye on the hole and on your tire pressure afterward, but you’ll probably find your new Q3 Plus is as good as new.


By hitting the Return, Escape or Power Off button, you hereby accept that you’re gullible enough to believe almost anything, and absolve Motorcycle.com and all its employees, contractors, assignees and livestock, its parent company, adjacent buildings, and the city of Toronto, ON, Canada, every manufacturer ever to make anything remotely involved with motorcycles, all 50 states and the District of Columbia, President Trump but not his staff, of anything the least bit negative to include chipped nails, bloating and water weight gain or death, that occurs as a result of our advice or implication of said advice, in perpetuity and forever. We mean it.

Send your moto-related questions to AskMOAnything@motorcycle.com.

Recent Ask MOs:
Why Are Touring Bikes So Damn Big?
Ask MO Anything: Is New Or Used Better?
What’s The Best Way To Ride Safe On Busy Freeways?

My Brand New Tire has a Nail in it! appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

Source: http://ift.tt/Xzx9iy

My Brand New Tire has a Nail in it!

Dear MOby,

Right, so, on the way home from having new Dunlop Q3 Pluses mounted on my almost-new 2005 GSX-R1000, I ran over a flathead nail which is still lodged right in the middle of the rear tread. I’ve read about plugging tires on MO, but is there a better way since this tire is brand new? Somebody told me I could just put a tube inside, even though it’s a tubeless tire? What’s the deal?

Holey of Holies
Burbank, CA


Do not feel like the Lone Ranger, Holey, this happens to the best of us. They actually do make tubes to fit your 190/50-ZR17 rear, but you definitely don’t want to go that route unless you plan on never going faster than about 70 mph again. Heat is the enemy of the rear tire on a bike as powerful as yours, and an inner tube rubbing against the inside of the tire as it flexes – and radials flex more than the old bias-ply tires – especially at higher speeds, could cause nasty consequences should the tube suddenly decide to exhale all at once.

When tubes go bad: When the one in this Indian Chief’s rear tire gave up the ghost a few years ago at 80 mph, and exited via the tire tread, it was not a pleasant experience.

When tubes go bad: When the one in this Indian Chief’s rear tire gave up the ghost a few years ago at 80 mph, and exited via the tire tread, it was not a pleasant experience.

We’ve had lots of fun with tire plugs, which are really only supposed to be an on-the-road fix to get you to a proper repair facility. If your tire was nearing the end of its life, plugs aren’t a bad way to go, but again, we wouldn’t want to, or advise you to, use all your bike’s power and speed on a plugged tire. Or even most of it.

There is another way, though, and it’ll make you and Dunlop both happy: the permanent patch from the inside. Here’s the word straight from the horse’s (Dunlop’s) website:


Some punctures in motorcycle tires may be repaired.

Dunlop recommends only permanent plug-patch repairs of small (maximum 1/4-inch diameter) tread-area punctures from within the dismounted tire by a qualified tire repair shop or motorcycle dealer. Never perform an exterior repair and never use an inner tube as a substitute for a proper repair. Speed should not exceed 50 mph for the first 24 hours after repair, and the repaired tire should never be used over 75 mph. Advise your customer to check inflation pressure after tire cools for at least three (3) hours following run-in, or sooner if air loss is suspected. See the Dunlop Service Advisory for additional motorcycle tubeless-tire repair information. Follow the same repair procedures for tires on rims requiring tube replacement. The repairer is solely responsible for the repair and any instructions to the repaired-tire user.

Advise your customers that no form of temporary repair should be attempted because secondary damage caused by a penetrating object may not be detected and tire or tube deflation may occur at a later date.

Dunlop does not recommend the use of liquid sealants. These are a form of temporary repair, and they may adversely affect ply material and mask secondary damage caused by a penetrating object. Advise your customers that reliance upon sealants can result in sudden tire failure and accident.


Finding a dealer willing to perform the patch operation can be hit and miss, but most independent bike shops will be happy to permanently patch your tire – and will have enough experience to recommend that you don’t patch it if they spot unexpected internal damage.

Definitely keep an eye on the hole and on your tire pressure afterward, but you’ll probably find your new Q3 Plus is as good as new.


By hitting the Return, Escape or Power Off button, you hereby accept that you’re gullible enough to believe almost anything, and absolve Motorcycle.com and all its employees, contractors, assignees and livestock, its parent company, adjacent buildings, and the city of Toronto, ON, Canada, every manufacturer ever to make anything remotely involved with motorcycles, all 50 states and the District of Columbia, President Trump but not his staff, of anything the least bit negative to include chipped nails, bloating and water weight gain or death, that occurs as a result of our advice or implication of said advice, in perpetuity and forever. We mean it.

Send your moto-related questions to AskMOAnything@motorcycle.com.

Recent Ask MOs:
Why Are Touring Bikes So Damn Big?
Ask MO Anything: Is New Or Used Better?
What’s The Best Way To Ride Safe On Busy Freeways?

My Brand New Tire has a Nail in it! appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

Source: http://ift.tt/Xzx9iy

BMW Teases New Convertible Concept Ahead of Pebble Beach Debut

BMW and Toyota fans alike have waited eagerly for any updates on the forthcoming Z4/Supra sports car developed jointly by the two automakers. We’ve only seen the sports car in camouflaged, test-mule form as it underwent testing on the Nurburgring, but that might be about to change. Thanks to a teaser from BMW, we’re getting our first glance at an open-air concept the German-Japanese roadster ahead of its debut at this year’s Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance that might be our first look at the Z4/Supra.

Don’t get too worked up – regardless of what it looks like, it’s still a concept. Still, this might be our first peek at what the two automakers have been working on for a few years now, and will serve as a solid preview of what we can expect to see. Purists hoping for a back-to-basics stripped-down, simplified sports car will likely be disappointed, considering reports have emerged predicting a hybrid powertrain and an automatic transmission as the only drivetrain option.

As much as we hope, there’s also a chance this isn’t a peek at the new Z4. An i8 Spider or 8 Series convertible are likely candidates as well, considering the i8 drop-top has been in development for a while, and the 8 Series convertible was recently spied turning laps on the Nurburgring earlier this month. Look for more information closer to the car’s debut in August.

Additionally, the striking Concept 8 Series BMW showed in May at the 2017 Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este will be making its first appearance on North American soil.

The post BMW Teases New Convertible Concept Ahead of Pebble Beach Debut appeared first on Automobile Magazine.

Source: http://ift.tt/LhoIaq

My Brand New Tire has a Nail in it!

Dear MOby,

Right, so, on the way home from having new Dunlop Q3 Pluses mounted on my almost-new 2005 GSX-R1000, I ran over a flathead nail which is still lodged right in the middle of the rear tread. I’ve read about plugging tires on MO, but is there a better way since this tire is brand new? Somebody told me I could just put a tube inside, even though it’s a tubeless tire? What’s the deal?

Holey of Holies
Burbank, CA


Do not feel like the Lone Ranger, Holey, this happens to the best of us. They actually do make tubes to fit your 190/50-ZR17 rear, but you definitely don’t want to go that route unless you plan on never going faster than about 70 mph again. Heat is the enemy of the rear tire on a bike as powerful as yours, and an inner tube rubbing against the inside of the tire as it flexes – and radials flex more than the old bias-ply tires – especially at higher speeds, could cause nasty consequences should the tube suddenly decide to exhale all at once.

When tubes go bad: When the one in this Indian Chief’s rear tire gave up the ghost a few years ago at 80 mph, and exited via the tire tread, it was not a pleasant experience.

When tubes go bad: When the one in this Indian Chief’s rear tire gave up the ghost a few years ago at 80 mph, and exited via the tire tread, it was not a pleasant experience.

We’ve had lots of fun with tire plugs, which are really only supposed to be an on-the-road fix to get you to a proper repair facility. If your tire was nearing the end of its life, plugs aren’t a bad way to go, but again, we wouldn’t want to, or advise you to, use all your bike’s power and speed on a plugged tire. Or even most of it.

There is another way, though, and it’ll make you and Dunlop both happy: the permanent patch from the inside. Here’s the word straight from the horse’s (Dunlop’s) website:


Some punctures in motorcycle tires may be repaired.

Dunlop recommends only permanent plug-patch repairs of small (maximum 1/4-inch diameter) tread-area punctures from within the dismounted tire by a qualified tire repair shop or motorcycle dealer. Never perform an exterior repair and never use an inner tube as a substitute for a proper repair. Speed should not exceed 50 mph for the first 24 hours after repair, and the repaired tire should never be used over 75 mph. Advise your customer to check inflation pressure after tire cools for at least three (3) hours following run-in, or sooner if air loss is suspected. See the Dunlop Service Advisory for additional motorcycle tubeless-tire repair information. Follow the same repair procedures for tires on rims requiring tube replacement. The repairer is solely responsible for the repair and any instructions to the repaired-tire user.

Advise your customers that no form of temporary repair should be attempted because secondary damage caused by a penetrating object may not be detected and tire or tube deflation may occur at a later date.

Dunlop does not recommend the use of liquid sealants. These are a form of temporary repair, and they may adversely affect ply material and mask secondary damage caused by a penetrating object. Advise your customers that reliance upon sealants can result in sudden tire failure and accident.


Finding a dealer willing to perform the patch operation can be hit and miss, but most independent bike shops will be happy to permanently patch your tire – and will have enough experience to recommend that you don’t patch it if they spot unexpected internal damage.

Definitely keep an eye on the hole and on your tire pressure afterward, but you’ll probably find your new Q3 Plus is as good as new.


By hitting the Return, Escape or Power Off button, you hereby accept that you’re gullible enough to believe almost anything, and absolve Motorcycle.com and all its employees, contractors, assignees and livestock, its parent company, adjacent buildings, and the city of Toronto, ON, Canada, every manufacturer ever to make anything remotely involved with motorcycles, all 50 states and the District of Columbia, President Trump but not his staff, of anything the least bit negative to include chipped nails, bloating and water weight gain or death, that occurs as a result of our advice or implication of said advice, in perpetuity and forever. We mean it.

Send your moto-related questions to AskMOAnything@motorcycle.com.

Recent Ask MOs:
Why Are Touring Bikes So Damn Big?
Ask MO Anything: Is New Or Used Better?
What’s The Best Way To Ride Safe On Busy Freeways?

My Brand New Tire has a Nail in it! appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

Source: http://ift.tt/Xzx9iy

BMW Teases New Convertible Concept Ahead of Pebble Beach Debut

BMW and Toyota fans alike have waited eagerly for any updates on the forthcoming Z4/Supra sports car developed jointly by the two automakers. We’ve only seen the sports car in camouflaged, test-mule form as it underwent testing on the Nurburgring, but that might be about to change. Thanks to a teaser from BMW, we’re getting our first glance at an open-air concept the German-Japanese roadster ahead of its debut at this year’s Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance that might be our first look at the Z4/Supra.

Don’t get too worked up – regardless of what it looks like, it’s still a concept. Still, this might be our first peek at what the two automakers have been working on for a few years now, and will serve as a solid preview of what we can expect to see. Purists hoping for a back-to-basics stripped-down, simplified sports car will likely be disappointed, considering reports have emerged predicting a hybrid powertrain and an automatic transmission as the only drivetrain option.

As much as we hope, there’s also a chance this isn’t a peek at the new Z4. An i8 Spider or 8 Series convertible are likely candidates as well, considering the i8 drop-top has been in development for a while, and the 8 Series convertible was recently spied turning laps on the Nurburgring earlier this month. Look for more information closer to the car’s debut in August.

Additionally, the striking Concept 8 Series BMW showed in May at the 2017 Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este will be making its first appearance on North American soil.

The post BMW Teases New Convertible Concept Ahead of Pebble Beach Debut appeared first on Automobile Magazine.

Source: http://ift.tt/LhoIaq

My Brand New Tire has a Nail in it!

Dear MOby,

Right, so, on the way home from having new Dunlop Q3 Pluses mounted on my almost-new 2005 GSX-R1000, I ran over a flathead nail which is still lodged right in the middle of the rear tread. I’ve read about plugging tires on MO, but is there a better way since this tire is brand new? Somebody told me I could just put a tube inside, even though it’s a tubeless tire? What’s the deal?

Holey of Holies
Burbank, CA


Do not feel like the Lone Ranger, Holey, this happens to the best of us. They actually do make tubes to fit your 190/50-ZR17 rear, but you definitely don’t want to go that route unless you plan on never going faster than about 70 mph again. Heat is the enemy of the rear tire on a bike as powerful as yours, and an inner tube rubbing against the inside of the tire as it flexes – and radials flex more than the old bias-ply tires – especially at higher speeds, could cause nasty consequences should the tube suddenly decide to exhale all at once.

When tubes go bad: When the one in this Indian Chief’s rear tire gave up the ghost a few years ago at 80 mph, and exited via the tire tread, it was not a pleasant experience.

When tubes go bad: When the one in this Indian Chief’s rear tire gave up the ghost a few years ago at 80 mph, and exited via the tire tread, it was not a pleasant experience.

We’ve had lots of fun with tire plugs, which are really only supposed to be an on-the-road fix to get you to a proper repair facility. If your tire was nearing the end of its life, plugs aren’t a bad way to go, but again, we wouldn’t want to, or advise you to, use all your bike’s power and speed on a plugged tire. Or even most of it.

There is another way, though, and it’ll make you and Dunlop both happy: the permanent patch from the inside. Here’s the word straight from the horse’s (Dunlop’s) website:


Some punctures in motorcycle tires may be repaired.

Dunlop recommends only permanent plug-patch repairs of small (maximum 1/4-inch diameter) tread-area punctures from within the dismounted tire by a qualified tire repair shop or motorcycle dealer. Never perform an exterior repair and never use an inner tube as a substitute for a proper repair. Speed should not exceed 50 mph for the first 24 hours after repair, and the repaired tire should never be used over 75 mph. Advise your customer to check inflation pressure after tire cools for at least three (3) hours following run-in, or sooner if air loss is suspected. See the Dunlop Service Advisory for additional motorcycle tubeless-tire repair information. Follow the same repair procedures for tires on rims requiring tube replacement. The repairer is solely responsible for the repair and any instructions to the repaired-tire user.

Advise your customers that no form of temporary repair should be attempted because secondary damage caused by a penetrating object may not be detected and tire or tube deflation may occur at a later date.

Dunlop does not recommend the use of liquid sealants. These are a form of temporary repair, and they may adversely affect ply material and mask secondary damage caused by a penetrating object. Advise your customers that reliance upon sealants can result in sudden tire failure and accident.


Finding a dealer willing to perform the patch operation can be hit and miss, but most independent bike shops will be happy to permanently patch your tire – and will have enough experience to recommend that you don’t patch it if they spot unexpected internal damage.

Definitely keep an eye on the hole and on your tire pressure afterward, but you’ll probably find your new Q3 Plus is as good as new.


By hitting the Return, Escape or Power Off button, you hereby accept that you’re gullible enough to believe almost anything, and absolve Motorcycle.com and all its employees, contractors, assignees and livestock, its parent company, adjacent buildings, and the city of Toronto, ON, Canada, every manufacturer ever to make anything remotely involved with motorcycles, all 50 states and the District of Columbia, President Trump but not his staff, of anything the least bit negative to include chipped nails, bloating and water weight gain or death, that occurs as a result of our advice or implication of said advice, in perpetuity and forever. We mean it.

Send your moto-related questions to AskMOAnything@motorcycle.com.

Recent Ask MOs:
Why Are Touring Bikes So Damn Big?
Ask MO Anything: Is New Or Used Better?
What’s The Best Way To Ride Safe On Busy Freeways?

My Brand New Tire has a Nail in it! appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

Source: http://ift.tt/Xzx9iy

The GoPro HERO5 Session Is On Sale For Its Lowest Price Ever​

You know what would makes awesome bike adventures even better? The chance to relive them later—the twisty singletrack, the screaming descents, the mid-ride bear encounters (well, hopefully not that last one). The allows you to do just that.

RELATED: 5 Great Point and Shoot Cameras

The Session 5 is a supremely portable, packable, and mountable camera that carries some serious tech into a tiny package. The 1.5-inch device captures 4K stabilized video and 10-megapixel photos in single, burst, and time-lapse modes. It’s waterproof up to 10 meters, and uses single-button controls, which make it simple to capture video or photos in any conditions—even rain or mud. With the camera, you also gain access to GoPro’s easy-to-use editing app.

If you’ve been hesitant about the $300 price tag of this model—which we previously named among the best tech for cyclists—now’s a great time to buy. Amazon dropped the price on the to just $239, the lowest price it’s ever been.

Original Price: $300
Buy Now:

The GoPro HERO5 Session ​109786 Source: http://ift.tt/eRBKpx

​Italian Cyclist Disqualified from Race for Mechanical Doping

An Italian amateur cyclist was disqualified from a masters race in Bedizzole, Italy, under suspicion of mechanical doping on Saturday.

According to the Gazzetta dello Sport (an Italian sports newspaper), race organizers were tipped off and used a thermal camera to identify a motor in third-place finisher Alessandro Andreoli’s bicycle. (Want to become a stronger rider sans hidden motor? Try Bicycling’s Maximum Overload training program.)

Organizer Emiliano Scalfi of the Centro Sportivo Italiano, an amateur sports governing body, said Andreoli’s seat tube looked like it was on fire, so they asked the 53-year-old cyclist to bring his bike in for inspection after the race. From there, the organizers examined the bike, but Andreoli would not allow them to disassemble it, stating that he was running late for a wedding.

While you shouldn’t illegally use a motor, here are nine things you can do on a bike that you can’t do anywhere else:

Scalfi said that Andreoli reportedly admitted to using a motor during the inspection, but Andreoli denied the confession and claimed he did not cheat in an interview with the Gazzetta dello Sport.

RELATED: How Does Mechanical Doping Work?

Also in the interview Andreoli said he couldn’t remember the name or number of the person from which he’d bought the bike (whom he’d allegedly met somewhere on the street) and that his recent improvements in racing were due to him solving his back issues and training hard, not mechanical doping. When asked why he had been disqualified, Andreoli reportedly responded that many people were jealous of his lifestyle because he earns a lot of money.

Mechanical doping is relatively rare, but Andreoli’s case isn’t the first time a racer has been disqualified for using a motor. Pro cycling saw its first confirmed case of mechanical doping when Femke Van den Driessche was caught in the 2016 Cyclocross World Championships in Belgium. Van den Driessche was fined and banned from the UCI for six years.

RELATED: Mechanical Doping Is Real and It Just Happened

Since then, thermal cameras have been used at the Tour de France. While no cases of mechanical doping in the pro Tour peloton have been reported, UCI technical manager Mark Barfield says he believes it could have happened before—but won’t be happening again.

Mechanical Doping​411 Source: http://ift.tt/eRBKpx