Chevrolet Corvettes Raise $2.325 Million At Barrett-Jackson To Benefit Military Veterans

GM and Chevrolet offered two first retail production Corvette models for auction at Barrett-Jackson today raising a total of $2.325 million to benefit military veterans.

Chevrolet Corvettes Raise $2.325 Million At Barrett-Jackson To Benefit Military Veterans originally appeared on Conceptcarz.com on Tue, 23 Jan 2018 05:29:07 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Source: http://ift.tt/2yQE2Xo

Rebel Mask

2017 Honda Rebel 500, custom built by Alessandro Dell’UntoPuzzle Garage

Alessandro named "Mask" his build because the bike can change its bodywork, and then its face, without the use of any wrench and the only aid of the ignition key. It all started a year ago, when, after winning the Honda Award at the MBE 2017 with the Tokyo Legend (*) Honda Italia gave Alessandro a brand new Rebel, completely stock, to be customized without any modification to the frame and kept street legal. For the technical support, Alessandro relied on Paolo Di Russo DRS who built the exhausts and some other details. Deep Impact took care of the black carbon bodywork (hydro dipping). Ivan Motta took care of the Honda graphics of the silver monocoque. The seats, one for each body, were created by the Autotappezzeria Sartoria Terry. An excellent project that completely changes the personality of a quite entry level, giving it an aggressive and fashionable character. 
Alessandro ha battezzato "Mask" questa sua creazione perchè la moto cambia carrozzeria, e quindi volto, senza l’utilizzo di attrezzi, con l’ausilio della sola chiave di accensione.
Tutto ha avuto inizio un anno fa, quando, dopo aver vinto l’Honda Award al MBE 2017 con la Tokyo Legend (*), Honda Italia ha affidato a Alessandro una Rebel nuova di pacca, completamente di serie, da customizzare in termini completamente omologabili e senza alcuna modifica al telaio. Per il supporto tecnico, Alessandro si è rivolto a Paolo Di Russo DRS che ha realizzato le scarico ed altri particolari. Deep Impact ha curato la carena cubicata in carbonio (finitura grafica per immersione). Ivan Motta ha curato la grafica Honda su sfondo argento. Le selle, una per ciascuna scocca, sono state create dalla Autotappezzeria Sartoria Terry. Un progetto eccellente, che cambia completamente la personalità di una paciosa entry level donandole una indole aggressiva e modaiola.


Shot @Verona MBE 2018 by and for Inazuma cafe
 

Source: http://ift.tt/2jgWT4U January 23, 2018 at 01:22PM

At a Glance: 2019 Kia Forte

Kia’s Forte compact sedan is big on style.

2019 Kia Forte.
2019 Kia Forte Sedan.

Son of a Stinger! At first glance, the 2019 Kia Forte looks a lot like the premium Kia Stinger performance sedan. Those ported design elements provide the Forte with perhaps the most handsome sheet metal amongst small cars, something certain to capture the attention of car shoppers.

Kia used the occasion of the 2018 North American International Auto Show in Detroit to debut the Forte sedan, now entering its third generation. As before, three trims are for the choosing: LX, S and EX. Pricing details will come later this year — likely closer to when the model goes on sale. In the interim, we should learn more about the Forte5 hatchback.

2019 Kia Forte

As for the model at hand, there’s plenty of details available front and center, including the following:

1. The Affordable Stinger

With a base price coming in at $32,800, the 2018 Stinger is beyond the reach of many mainstream car shoppers. The Stinger’s price, however, is very reasonable when stacking it against luxury models such as the BMW 3 Series or Cadillac ATS. But we’re talking about the 2019 Forte, a sedan that will cost half as much, while taking on such segment stalwarts as the Toyota Corolla, Honda Civic and Nissan Sentra. So, what you have here is a budget sedan with a premium look. My, look how far we come from the econoboxes prevalent in the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s!

2019 Kia Forte2. Longer, Taller and Wider

Today’s compact sedans rival the size of midsize models from about 15 years ago. All manufacturers, Kia included, have adopted longer platforms, while delivering more powerful and efficient models. Engineering changes and the expanded use of lightweight materials are behind the effort. Consumers are the winners because they get more car for the money.

3. Kia’s First CVT

We don’t have full information yet about the powertrains available with the 2019 Forte. What we do know is the base model comes with a 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine, generating 147 horsepower and 132 pound-feet of torque. We also know the very first continuously variable automatic transmission offered by Kia sends power to the front wheels. This is an important move for the automaker as a CVT is more efficient than a cog-driven unit and should raise fuel economy by about 3 mpg to 35 mpg according to a Kia estimate.

4. Standard and available technologies

Compact mainstream models include technologies luxury manufacturers were just beginning to offer five years ago. Besides that, some of the tech features such as smartphone connectivity via Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are free. You can’t say that about BMW, which charges $300 for CarPlay. The 2019 Forte also presents an 8-inch color touchscreen and that’s quite a bit larger than what you’d find in this class, especially for standard equipment. An available wireless charging tray is compatible with Android devices and for Apple iPhones from the 8 Series on up.

2019 Kia Forte

5. Driver-Assist Technologies for the Masses

We’ve been seeing so-called driver assist technologies move down from more expensive models to mainstream vehicles and that’s always a good thing. The 2019 Forte delivers standard blind-spot collision warning and smart cruise control. Available features include forward collision-avoidance assist and smart cruise control, the latter useful for maintaining proper and safe distances between vehicles no matter the speed.

Kia Continues to Impress

From a journalist’s perspective, Kia has certainly impressed me with what it has done these past five to 10 years to its product line. Although tied in with Hyundai as part of the Hyundai Kia Automotive Group, Kia has its own take on the platforms it shares with some models unique to itself, including the Sedona minivan and Soul multi-purpose vehicle.

2019 Kia Forte


See Also — Refreshed Jeep Cherokee Includes New Turbo Engine

Photos copyright Kia Motors. All rights reserved.

The post At a Glance: 2019 Kia Forte appeared first on Auto Trends Magazine.

Source: http://autotrends.org

Dakine’s Hot Laps Is the Cycling Hip Pack We’ve Been Waiting For

A hip pack—a souped up version of the old fanny pack—can be a great option for mountain bikers who don’t like dealing with cumbersome hydration packs, or carrying extra weight on their shoulders. Unlike those flappy old packs, the better cycling hip packs, like this option from Dakine, don’t bounce around and come with all the hydration and storage features a mountain biker needs. I’m a fan because, with the weight of your water lower on my body and not swishing around my back, I feel more stable on technical trails. Plus, ditching the backpack allows my back and torso to breathe on sweaty days.

The Hot Laps 5L Waist Bag ($70 at rei.com) is a new model from Dakine, and I was impressed by how it packed so much functionality into a simple package. My favorite thing might be how the waist closure clips and cinches from one side (rather from the center or back, like some hip packs). That kept my waist and belly clear of bulky clips when I folded over on my bike into a more aggressive position. Also, this pack seemed to bounce and slide around less than others. There’s a small, but tough section of stretchy cordura attaching the clip to the body of the pack, which seemed to create a more snug fit.  

One of the tricker elements of a hip pack is getting the hose routing dialed. Because it comes around your waist and up, it requires more attention than on a traditional backpack. To help keep the hose in an accessible, but out-of-the-way spot, Dakine uses a magnet and an extra clip to secure the routing and prevent it from detaching when pulled straight out. You have to bend down to drink more than with other packs, but it’s pretty easy once you find the sweet spot and the hose always stayed in place, even as I bounced down super rocky trails.

RELATED: 5 Reasons You Should Drink More Water

With a 5-liter storage capacity, the pack has plenty of space for snacks and even a light jacket in the main compartment. It’s got two zipper pockets: one to house the 2-liter Hydrapack bladder (included), and a second with dividers to organize tools and essentials. If 5 liters is more space than you need, there’s a 2-liter option offered without a bladder, and an ultra-light stealth option that’s slim enough to be worn under a jersey. 

dakine hot laps pockets
The main compartment includes a fuzzy phone pocket, and loops for your cartridge, inflator, spare tube, and multitool Photograph courtesy of Bicycling

* * *

back of dakine hot laps
The back panel features striated foam with a mesh covering to help aid ventilation Photograph courtesy of Bicycling

* * *

dakine hot laps clips
Cinchable hook clips let you strap on bulkier items that might not fit in the main compartment Photograph courtesy of Bicycling

* * *

hot laps hose clip
The magnetic hose clip has an extra flange to keep the magnet from clipping straight out, like it might from bouncing on the trail. It only un-clips when you pull it slightly down. Photograph courtesy of Bicycling

Dakine Hot Laps Hip Pack Cycling Bag109518 Source: http://ift.tt/2w5Oysm

2018 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara First Test: Duality

Revamping an icon is never easy, especially when that icon’s history is as storied as the Jeep Wrangler’s. I’ll spare you the details that you (probably) already know, but the all-new 2018 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara, in all of its heated leather seats and Apple CarPlay glory, is the modern day descendent of the World War II Jeeps that helped roll back totalitarianism in Europe in Asia.

Basically, the new 2018 Wrangler has some pretty big shoes to fill. And a lot of boxes to check, too.

Code-named JL, the new Wrangler replaces the decade-old but beloved JK-series Wrangler. Associate editor Scott Evans did an excellent job digging into all the changes, big and small, made to the 2018 Wrangler in his First Look and First Drive, so I’ll keep things brief. Basically, the Wrangler is new from its axles and frame on up to its three new (still removable) roof options. Jeep’s goal for the new 2018 Wrangler is to balance the dueling demands of those who buy Wranglers to adventure off-road and those who buy ’em to drive around town because they look cool. Of the three versions of the new Wrangler on sale (Sport, Sahara, and Rubicon), none sums this duality up better than the luxury- and street-oriented Sahara.




With the Wrangler Rubicon expected to capture the hardcore off-roaders and the Wrangler Sport serving as the jack-of-all-trades entry into the lineup, the Wrangler Sahara is aimed mostly at buyers who prefer streets to slick rock. Its standard features and options list reflects that. Standard are four doors (every other Wrangler variant is also available with two doors), street-oriented tires, chrome accents, and body-color fender flares that’d get pinstriped off-road. The Wrangler Sahara’s option list is long, but notable is a Sahara-exclusive Selec-Trac full-time four-wheel-drive system, which is ideal for those only using their Jeep’s four-wheel-drive system in inclement weather.

Aside from the optional Selec-Trac transfer case, the 2018 Wrangler Sahara shares the rest of its powertrain with its Sport and Rubicon stablemates. Under the hood is a retuned version of the JK Wrangler’s 3.6-liter V-6, in the Sahara making 285 hp and 260 lb-ft of torque. A six-speed manual is standard, but our tester is equipped with an optional eight-speed automatic. A new 2.0-liter turbocharged I-4 making 268 hp and 295 lb-ft of torque is optional, and a 3.0-liter turbodiesel V-6 is expected to join the lineup next year.








At the track, the 10 years (and roughly 200 pounds) separating the new Wrangler from the old JK model is readily apparent. Stomp on the accelerator, and the 2018 Wrangler Sahara accelerates from 0 to 60 mph in 6.9 seconds and goes through the quarter mile in 15.3 seconds at 89.9 mph. That’s a drastic improvement over the last JK Jeep we tested, a 2016 Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon equipped with a soft top and five-speed auto. It needed 8.2 seconds to hit 60 mph and 16.3 seconds to get through the quarter at 82.5 mph. The new Jeep stops and turns way better than the old one, too. It’s best 60–0-mph performance was 128 feet, and it lapped our figure-eight course in a respectable 28.3 seconds at 0.58 g average. The 2018 Wrangler beats the old one at the pump, too; it’s EPA-rated at 18/23/20 mpg city/highway/combined versus 16/20/18 mpg. In our mixed testing, we averaged an indicated 19.7 mpg.

The performance improvements seen at the track are even more apparent out on the road in the real world.

I spent the week leading up to testing the 2018 Wrangler driving around in my mom’s two-door auto-equipped 2015 Wrangler Polar Edition, and the difference between JK and JL Wrangler is like the difference between cheeseburger and a rib-eye steak—both are still good, but you’d rather have the rib-eye, wouldn’t you?








Whereas the old Wrangler was charmingly sluggish and rough around the edges, the new Jeep drives like a modern pickup. It still feels like a Jeep, yes, but the ride is buttoned-down and forgiving, the front end doesn’t wander waywardly over bumps, and the Wrangler’s steering, although still a slow ratio for off-roading, is well-weighted and accurate on the road.

The Wrangler’s new eight-speed automatic significantly livens up Jeep’s 3.6-liter V-6, too. The new eight-speed shifts quickly and unobtrusively and is happy to hold a lower gear going uphill during passing or downhill to help you maintain speed. Finally freed of the boat anchor five-speed, the V-6 feels quick and athletic, with plenty of passing power on tap. I’m told you’ll want that optional 2.0-liter engine if you drive it, but if you never bother I think most will be satisfied with the V-6.

The new transmission also has the added benefit of helping make the Wrangler’s cabin quieter than before by keeping engines rev lower. The cabin of our loaded tester, equipped with an optional hard top and hard top headliner, leather, and heated seats, is a much nicer place to spend time than the previous Wrangler. I wouldn’t go so far as to call the Wrangler Sahara’s cabin luxurious, but it feels premium, with soft, high-quality leather, soft-touch plastics, comfortable seats, and a modern infotainment system.








Arguably Jeep’s biggest challenge with the new 2018 Wrangler was ensuring it hadn’t gone soft on off-road performance. I’m happy to report it hasn’t. I spent a rare rainy Southern California morning exploring the state’s Hungry Valley off-road recreation area. I started out familiarizing myself with the new Wrangler on a particularly easy course that nonetheless required four-low from a couple of Japanese SUVs when I was there recently for an upcoming story. As I motored up the steep hill climb in two-wheel drive, the Jeep started to slip a bit, so I shifted into the Wrangler Sahara’s 4A mode, and it continued up without skipping a beat.

Confident I was familiarized with the new Wrangler’s dimensions, I headed out for more challenging trails.

Call it typical millennial anxiety, but I’m always reluctant going anywhere off-road by myself without the most capable hardware possible. When alone, I rarely go exploring anywhere off-road that I don’t think I can get myself out of, but regardless I still want aggressive, puncture-proof off-road tires, low range, and locking diffs front and back. Despite the Wrangler Sahara’s road-oriented tires and lack of locking diffs, the Jeep never once made me anxious; it easily tackled whatever I threw at it. On the toughest obstacle I faced—a steep, heavily rutted hill climb with loose-packed dirt and mud that frequently put me on three wheels—the Jeep was struggling a bit for grip in 4H, so I shifted down to 4L. In that mode traction control comes off and the electronic brake lock diffs go into action; I could feel the calipers being grabbed as the Jeep routed power to the wheels with most traction, and without any further delay, it motored right on up.

Just about the only place the new 2018 Wrangler can’t match the old is in price. With JK Wranglers already flying off the lots, Jeep upped prices across the board on its new JL Wrangler. Prices for the 2018 Wrangler Unlimited Sahara start at $38,540 for a soft-top, six-speed manual-equipped version. Our nearly loaded tester stickered for $50,220—though it’s worth noting if you spec an identical Wrangler Sahara on Jeep’s configurator the cost has crept higher, to $51,115, due to some option package changes. A similarly equipped 2018 Wrangler JK Unlimited Sahara will set you back $45,640, a $5,475 difference. That’s a significant price increase, but given how much nicer the new Wrangler drives and the newfound interior quality, it’s worth the premium.

After all—this Jeep is the first Wrangler to actually be as nice to drive on the road as it is off. The 2018 Jeep Wrangler has some pretty big shoes to fill and some competing goals to accomplish, but Jeep’s absolutely nailed it. Welcome to the 21st century, Wrangler.

2018 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara
BASE PRICE $38,540
PRICE AS TESTED $50,220
VEHICLE LAYOUT Front-engine, 4WD, 5-pass, 4-door SUV
ENGINE 3.6L/285-hp/260-lb-ft DOHC 24-valve V-6
TRANSMISSION 8-speed automatic
CURB WEIGHT (F/R DIST) 4,391 lb (52/48%)
WHEELBASE 118.4 in
LENGTH x WIDTH x HEIGHT 188.4 x 73.8 x 73.6 in
0-60 MPH 6.9 sec
QUARTER MILE 15.3 sec @ 89.9 mph
BRAKING, 60-0 MPH 128 ft
LATERAL ACCELERATION 0.73 g (avg)
MT FIGURE EIGHT 28.3 sec @ 0.58 g (avg)
EPA CITY/HWY/COMB FUEL ECON 18/23/20 mpg
ENERGY CONS, CITY/HWY 187/147 kW-hrs/100 miles
CO2 EMISSIONS, COMB 0.97 lb/mile

































































































































































































































































































The post 2018 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara First Test: Duality appeared first on Motor Trend.

Source: http://ift.tt/JPPTFe

2018 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara First Test: Duality

Revamping an icon is never easy, especially when that icon’s history is as storied as the Jeep Wrangler’s. I’ll spare you the details that you (probably) already know, but the all-new 2018 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara, in all of its heated leather seats and Apple CarPlay glory, is the modern day descendent of the World War II Jeeps that helped roll back totalitarianism in Europe in Asia.

Basically, the new 2018 Wrangler has some pretty big shoes to fill. And a lot of boxes to check, too.

Code-named JL, the new Wrangler replaces the decade-old but beloved JK-series Wrangler. Associate editor Scott Evans did an excellent job digging into all the changes, big and small, made to the 2018 Wrangler in his First Look and First Drive, so I’ll keep things brief. Basically, the Wrangler is new from its axles and frame on up to its three new (still removable) roof options. Jeep’s goal for the new 2018 Wrangler is to balance the dueling demands of those who buy Wranglers to adventure off-road and those who buy ’em to drive around town because they look cool. Of the three versions of the new Wrangler on sale (Sport, Sahara, and Rubicon), none sums this duality up better than the luxury- and street-oriented Sahara.




With the Wrangler Rubicon expected to capture the hardcore off-roaders and the Wrangler Sport serving as the jack-of-all-trades entry into the lineup, the Wrangler Sahara is aimed mostly at buyers who prefer streets to slick rock. Its standard features and options list reflects that. Standard are four doors (every other Wrangler variant is also available with two doors), street-oriented tires, chrome accents, and body-color fender flares that’d get pinstriped off-road. The Wrangler Sahara’s option list is long, but notable is a Sahara-exclusive Selec-Trac full-time four-wheel-drive system, which is ideal for those only using their Jeep’s four-wheel-drive system in inclement weather.

Aside from the optional Selec-Trac transfer case, the 2018 Wrangler Sahara shares the rest of its powertrain with its Sport and Rubicon stablemates. Under the hood is a retuned version of the JK Wrangler’s 3.6-liter V-6, in the Sahara making 285 hp and 260 lb-ft of torque. A six-speed manual is standard, but our tester is equipped with an optional eight-speed automatic. A new 2.0-liter turbocharged I-4 making 268 hp and 295 lb-ft of torque is optional, and a 3.0-liter turbodiesel V-6 is expected to join the lineup next year.








At the track, the 10 years (and roughly 200 pounds) separating the new Wrangler from the old JK model is readily apparent. Stomp on the accelerator, and the 2018 Wrangler Sahara accelerates from 0 to 60 mph in 6.9 seconds and goes through the quarter mile in 15.3 seconds at 89.9 mph. That’s a drastic improvement over the last JK Jeep we tested, a 2016 Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon equipped with a soft top and five-speed auto. It needed 8.2 seconds to hit 60 mph and 16.3 seconds to get through the quarter at 82.5 mph. The new Jeep stops and turns way better than the old one, too. It’s best 60–0-mph performance was 128 feet, and it lapped our figure-eight course in a respectable 28.3 seconds at 0.58 g average. The 2018 Wrangler beats the old one at the pump, too; it’s EPA-rated at 18/23/20 mpg city/highway/combined versus 16/20/18 mpg. In our mixed testing, we averaged an indicated 19.7 mpg.

The performance improvements seen at the track are even more apparent out on the road in the real world.

I spent the week leading up to testing the 2018 Wrangler driving around in my mom’s two-door auto-equipped 2015 Wrangler Polar Edition, and the difference between JK and JL Wrangler is like the difference between cheeseburger and a rib-eye steak—both are still good, but you’d rather have the rib-eye, wouldn’t you?








Whereas the old Wrangler was charmingly sluggish and rough around the edges, the new Jeep drives like a modern pickup. It still feels like a Jeep, yes, but the ride is buttoned-down and forgiving, the front end doesn’t wander waywardly over bumps, and the Wrangler’s steering, although still a slow ratio for off-roading, is well-weighted and accurate on the road.

The Wrangler’s new eight-speed automatic significantly livens up Jeep’s 3.6-liter V-6, too. The new eight-speed shifts quickly and unobtrusively and is happy to hold a lower gear going uphill during passing or downhill to help you maintain speed. Finally freed of the boat anchor five-speed, the V-6 feels quick and athletic, with plenty of passing power on tap. I’m told you’ll want that optional 2.0-liter engine if you drive it, but if you never bother I think most will be satisfied with the V-6.

The new transmission also has the added benefit of helping make the Wrangler’s cabin quieter than before by keeping engines rev lower. The cabin of our loaded tester, equipped with an optional hard top and hard top headliner, leather, and heated seats, is a much nicer place to spend time than the previous Wrangler. I wouldn’t go so far as to call the Wrangler Sahara’s cabin luxurious, but it feels premium, with soft, high-quality leather, soft-touch plastics, comfortable seats, and a modern infotainment system.








Arguably Jeep’s biggest challenge with the new 2018 Wrangler was ensuring it hadn’t gone soft on off-road performance. I’m happy to report it hasn’t. I spent a rare rainy Southern California morning exploring the state’s Hungry Valley off-road recreation area. I started out familiarizing myself with the new Wrangler on a particularly easy course that nonetheless required four-low from a couple of Japanese SUVs when I was there recently for an upcoming story. As I motored up the steep hill climb in two-wheel drive, the Jeep started to slip a bit, so I shifted into the Wrangler Sahara’s 4A mode, and it continued up without skipping a beat.

Confident I was familiarized with the new Wrangler’s dimensions, I headed out for more challenging trails.

Call it typical millennial anxiety, but I’m always reluctant going anywhere off-road by myself without the most capable hardware possible. When alone, I rarely go exploring anywhere off-road that I don’t think I can get myself out of, but regardless I still want aggressive, puncture-proof off-road tires, low range, and locking diffs front and back. Despite the Wrangler Sahara’s road-oriented tires and lack of locking diffs, the Jeep never once made me anxious; it easily tackled whatever I threw at it. On the toughest obstacle I faced—a steep, heavily rutted hill climb with loose-packed dirt and mud that frequently put me on three wheels—the Jeep was struggling a bit for grip in 4H, so I shifted down to 4L. In that mode traction control comes off and the electronic brake lock diffs go into action; I could feel the calipers being grabbed as the Jeep routed power to the wheels with most traction, and without any further delay, it motored right on up.

Just about the only place the new 2018 Wrangler can’t match the old is in price. With JK Wranglers already flying off the lots, Jeep upped prices across the board on its new JL Wrangler. Prices for the 2018 Wrangler Unlimited Sahara start at $38,540 for a soft-top, six-speed manual-equipped version. Our nearly loaded tester stickered for $50,220—though it’s worth noting if you spec an identical Wrangler Sahara on Jeep’s configurator the cost has crept higher, to $51,115, due to some option package changes. A similarly equipped 2018 Wrangler JK Unlimited Sahara will set you back $45,640, a $5,475 difference. That’s a significant price increase, but given how much nicer the new Wrangler drives and the newfound interior quality, it’s worth the premium.

After all—this Jeep is the first Wrangler to actually be as nice to drive on the road as it is off. The 2018 Jeep Wrangler has some pretty big shoes to fill and some competing goals to accomplish, but Jeep’s absolutely nailed it. Welcome to the 21st century, Wrangler.

2018 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara
BASE PRICE $38,540
PRICE AS TESTED $50,220
VEHICLE LAYOUT Front-engine, 4WD, 5-pass, 4-door SUV
ENGINE 3.6L/285-hp/260-lb-ft DOHC 24-valve V-6
TRANSMISSION 8-speed automatic
CURB WEIGHT (F/R DIST) 4,391 lb (52/48%)
WHEELBASE 118.4 in
LENGTH x WIDTH x HEIGHT 188.4 x 73.8 x 73.6 in
0-60 MPH 6.9 sec
QUARTER MILE 15.3 sec @ 89.9 mph
BRAKING, 60-0 MPH 128 ft
LATERAL ACCELERATION 0.73 g (avg)
MT FIGURE EIGHT 28.3 sec @ 0.58 g (avg)
EPA CITY/HWY/COMB FUEL ECON 18/23/20 mpg
ENERGY CONS, CITY/HWY 187/147 kW-hrs/100 miles
CO2 EMISSIONS, COMB 0.97 lb/mile

































































































































































































































































































The post 2018 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara First Test: Duality appeared first on Motor Trend.

Source: http://ift.tt/JPPTFe

2018 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara First Test: Duality

Revamping an icon is never easy, especially when that icon’s history is as storied as the Jeep Wrangler’s. I’ll spare you the details that you (probably) already know, but the all-new 2018 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara, in all of its heated leather seats and Apple CarPlay glory, is the modern day descendent of the World War II Jeeps that helped roll back totalitarianism in Europe in Asia.

Basically, the new 2018 Wrangler has some pretty big shoes to fill. And a lot of boxes to check, too.

Code-named JL, the new Wrangler replaces the decade-old but beloved JK-series Wrangler. Associate editor Scott Evans did an excellent job digging into all the changes, big and small, made to the 2018 Wrangler in his First Look and First Drive, so I’ll keep things brief. Basically, the Wrangler is new from its axles and frame on up to its three new (still removable) roof options. Jeep’s goal for the new 2018 Wrangler is to balance the dueling demands of those who buy Wranglers to adventure off-road and those who buy ’em to drive around town because they look cool. Of the three versions of the new Wrangler on sale (Sport, Sahara, and Rubicon), none sums this duality up better than the luxury- and street-oriented Sahara.




With the Wrangler Rubicon expected to capture the hardcore off-roaders and the Wrangler Sport serving as the jack-of-all-trades entry into the lineup, the Wrangler Sahara is aimed mostly at buyers who prefer streets to slick rock. Its standard features and options list reflects that. Standard are four doors (every other Wrangler variant is also available with two doors), street-oriented tires, chrome accents, and body-color fender flares that’d get pinstriped off-road. The Wrangler Sahara’s option list is long, but notable is a Sahara-exclusive Selec-Trac full-time four-wheel-drive system, which is ideal for those only using their Jeep’s four-wheel-drive system in inclement weather.

Aside from the optional Selec-Trac transfer case, the 2018 Wrangler Sahara shares the rest of its powertrain with its Sport and Rubicon stablemates. Under the hood is a retuned version of the JK Wrangler’s 3.6-liter V-6, in the Sahara making 285 hp and 260 lb-ft of torque. A six-speed manual is standard, but our tester is equipped with an optional eight-speed automatic. A new 2.0-liter turbocharged I-4 making 268 hp and 295 lb-ft of torque is optional, and a 3.0-liter turbodiesel V-6 is expected to join the lineup next year.








At the track, the 10 years (and roughly 200 pounds) separating the new Wrangler from the old JK model is readily apparent. Stomp on the accelerator, and the 2018 Wrangler Sahara accelerates from 0 to 60 mph in 6.9 seconds and goes through the quarter mile in 15.3 seconds at 89.9 mph. That’s a drastic improvement over the last JK Jeep we tested, a 2016 Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon equipped with a soft top and five-speed auto. It needed 8.2 seconds to hit 60 mph and 16.3 seconds to get through the quarter at 82.5 mph. The new Jeep stops and turns way better than the old one, too. It’s best 60–0-mph performance was 128 feet, and it lapped our figure-eight course in a respectable 28.3 seconds at 0.58 g average. The 2018 Wrangler beats the old one at the pump, too; it’s EPA-rated at 18/23/20 mpg city/highway/combined versus 16/20/18 mpg. In our mixed testing, we averaged an indicated 19.7 mpg.

The performance improvements seen at the track are even more apparent out on the road in the real world.

I spent the week leading up to testing the 2018 Wrangler driving around in my mom’s two-door auto-equipped 2015 Wrangler Polar Edition, and the difference between JK and JL Wrangler is like the difference between cheeseburger and a rib-eye steak—both are still good, but you’d rather have the rib-eye, wouldn’t you?








Whereas the old Wrangler was charmingly sluggish and rough around the edges, the new Jeep drives like a modern pickup. It still feels like a Jeep, yes, but the ride is buttoned-down and forgiving, the front end doesn’t wander waywardly over bumps, and the Wrangler’s steering, although still a slow ratio for off-roading, is well-weighted and accurate on the road.

The Wrangler’s new eight-speed automatic significantly livens up Jeep’s 3.6-liter V-6, too. The new eight-speed shifts quickly and unobtrusively and is happy to hold a lower gear going uphill during passing or downhill to help you maintain speed. Finally freed of the boat anchor five-speed, the V-6 feels quick and athletic, with plenty of passing power on tap. I’m told you’ll want that optional 2.0-liter engine if you drive it, but if you never bother I think most will be satisfied with the V-6.

The new transmission also has the added benefit of helping make the Wrangler’s cabin quieter than before by keeping engines rev lower. The cabin of our loaded tester, equipped with an optional hard top and hard top headliner, leather, and heated seats, is a much nicer place to spend time than the previous Wrangler. I wouldn’t go so far as to call the Wrangler Sahara’s cabin luxurious, but it feels premium, with soft, high-quality leather, soft-touch plastics, comfortable seats, and a modern infotainment system.








Arguably Jeep’s biggest challenge with the new 2018 Wrangler was ensuring it hadn’t gone soft on off-road performance. I’m happy to report it hasn’t. I spent a rare rainy Southern California morning exploring the state’s Hungry Valley off-road recreation area. I started out familiarizing myself with the new Wrangler on a particularly easy course that nonetheless required four-low from a couple of Japanese SUVs when I was there recently for an upcoming story. As I motored up the steep hill climb in two-wheel drive, the Jeep started to slip a bit, so I shifted into the Wrangler Sahara’s 4A mode, and it continued up without skipping a beat.

Confident I was familiarized with the new Wrangler’s dimensions, I headed out for more challenging trails.

Call it typical millennial anxiety, but I’m always reluctant going anywhere off-road by myself without the most capable hardware possible. When alone, I rarely go exploring anywhere off-road that I don’t think I can get myself out of, but regardless I still want aggressive, puncture-proof off-road tires, low range, and locking diffs front and back. Despite the Wrangler Sahara’s road-oriented tires and lack of locking diffs, the Jeep never once made me anxious; it easily tackled whatever I threw at it. On the toughest obstacle I faced—a steep, heavily rutted hill climb with loose-packed dirt and mud that frequently put me on three wheels—the Jeep was struggling a bit for grip in 4H, so I shifted down to 4L. In that mode traction control comes off and the electronic brake lock diffs go into action; I could feel the calipers being grabbed as the Jeep routed power to the wheels with most traction, and without any further delay, it motored right on up.

Just about the only place the new 2018 Wrangler can’t match the old is in price. With JK Wranglers already flying off the lots, Jeep upped prices across the board on its new JL Wrangler. Prices for the 2018 Wrangler Unlimited Sahara start at $38,540 for a soft-top, six-speed manual-equipped version. Our nearly loaded tester stickered for $50,220—though it’s worth noting if you spec an identical Wrangler Sahara on Jeep’s configurator the cost has crept higher, to $51,115, due to some option package changes. A similarly equipped 2018 Wrangler JK Unlimited Sahara will set you back $45,640, a $5,475 difference. That’s a significant price increase, but given how much nicer the new Wrangler drives and the newfound interior quality, it’s worth the premium.

After all—this Jeep is the first Wrangler to actually be as nice to drive on the road as it is off. The 2018 Jeep Wrangler has some pretty big shoes to fill and some competing goals to accomplish, but Jeep’s absolutely nailed it. Welcome to the 21st century, Wrangler.

2018 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara
BASE PRICE $38,540
PRICE AS TESTED $50,220
VEHICLE LAYOUT Front-engine, 4WD, 5-pass, 4-door SUV
ENGINE 3.6L/285-hp/260-lb-ft DOHC 24-valve V-6
TRANSMISSION 8-speed automatic
CURB WEIGHT (F/R DIST) 4,391 lb (52/48%)
WHEELBASE 118.4 in
LENGTH x WIDTH x HEIGHT 188.4 x 73.8 x 73.6 in
0-60 MPH 6.9 sec
QUARTER MILE 15.3 sec @ 89.9 mph
BRAKING, 60-0 MPH 128 ft
LATERAL ACCELERATION 0.73 g (avg)
MT FIGURE EIGHT 28.3 sec @ 0.58 g (avg)
EPA CITY/HWY/COMB FUEL ECON 18/23/20 mpg
ENERGY CONS, CITY/HWY 187/147 kW-hrs/100 miles
CO2 EMISSIONS, COMB 0.97 lb/mile

































































































































































































































































































The post 2018 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara First Test: Duality appeared first on Motor Trend.

Source: http://ift.tt/JPPTFe

2018 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara First Test: Duality

Revamping an icon is never easy, especially when that icon’s history is as storied as the Jeep Wrangler’s. I’ll spare you the details that you (probably) already know, but the all-new 2018 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara, in all of its heated leather seats and Apple CarPlay glory, is the modern day descendent of the World War II Jeeps that helped roll back totalitarianism in Europe in Asia.

Basically, the new 2018 Wrangler has some pretty big shoes to fill. And a lot of boxes to check, too.

Code-named JL, the new Wrangler replaces the decade-old but beloved JK-series Wrangler. Associate editor Scott Evans did an excellent job digging into all the changes, big and small, made to the 2018 Wrangler in his First Look and First Drive, so I’ll keep things brief. Basically, the Wrangler is new from its axles and frame on up to its three new (still removable) roof options. Jeep’s goal for the new 2018 Wrangler is to balance the dueling demands of those who buy Wranglers to adventure off-road and those who buy ’em to drive around town because they look cool. Of the three versions of the new Wrangler on sale (Sport, Sahara, and Rubicon), none sums this duality up better than the luxury- and street-oriented Sahara.




With the Wrangler Rubicon expected to capture the hardcore off-roaders and the Wrangler Sport serving as the jack-of-all-trades entry into the lineup, the Wrangler Sahara is aimed mostly at buyers who prefer streets to slick rock. Its standard features and options list reflects that. Standard are four doors (every other Wrangler variant is also available with two doors), street-oriented tires, chrome accents, and body-color fender flares that’d get pinstriped off-road. The Wrangler Sahara’s option list is long, but notable is a Sahara-exclusive Selec-Trac full-time four-wheel-drive system, which is ideal for those only using their Jeep’s four-wheel-drive system in inclement weather.

Aside from the optional Selec-Trac transfer case, the 2018 Wrangler Sahara shares the rest of its powertrain with its Sport and Rubicon stablemates. Under the hood is a retuned version of the JK Wrangler’s 3.6-liter V-6, in the Sahara making 285 hp and 260 lb-ft of torque. A six-speed manual is standard, but our tester is equipped with an optional eight-speed automatic. A new 2.0-liter turbocharged I-4 making 268 hp and 295 lb-ft of torque is optional, and a 3.0-liter turbodiesel V-6 is expected to join the lineup next year.








At the track, the 10 years (and roughly 200 pounds) separating the new Wrangler from the old JK model is readily apparent. Stomp on the accelerator, and the 2018 Wrangler Sahara accelerates from 0 to 60 mph in 6.9 seconds and goes through the quarter mile in 15.3 seconds at 89.9 mph. That’s a drastic improvement over the last JK Jeep we tested, a 2016 Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon equipped with a soft top and five-speed auto. It needed 8.2 seconds to hit 60 mph and 16.3 seconds to get through the quarter at 82.5 mph. The new Jeep stops and turns way better than the old one, too. It’s best 60–0-mph performance was 128 feet, and it lapped our figure-eight course in a respectable 28.3 seconds at 0.58 g average. The 2018 Wrangler beats the old one at the pump, too; it’s EPA-rated at 18/23/20 mpg city/highway/combined versus 16/20/18 mpg. In our mixed testing, we averaged an indicated 19.7 mpg.

The performance improvements seen at the track are even more apparent out on the road in the real world.

I spent the week leading up to testing the 2018 Wrangler driving around in my mom’s two-door auto-equipped 2015 Wrangler Polar Edition, and the difference between JK and JL Wrangler is like the difference between cheeseburger and a rib-eye steak—both are still good, but you’d rather have the rib-eye, wouldn’t you?








Whereas the old Wrangler was charmingly sluggish and rough around the edges, the new Jeep drives like a modern pickup. It still feels like a Jeep, yes, but the ride is buttoned-down and forgiving, the front end doesn’t wander waywardly over bumps, and the Wrangler’s steering, although still a slow ratio for off-roading, is well-weighted and accurate on the road.

The Wrangler’s new eight-speed automatic significantly livens up Jeep’s 3.6-liter V-6, too. The new eight-speed shifts quickly and unobtrusively and is happy to hold a lower gear going uphill during passing or downhill to help you maintain speed. Finally freed of the boat anchor five-speed, the V-6 feels quick and athletic, with plenty of passing power on tap. I’m told you’ll want that optional 2.0-liter engine if you drive it, but if you never bother I think most will be satisfied with the V-6.

The new transmission also has the added benefit of helping make the Wrangler’s cabin quieter than before by keeping engines rev lower. The cabin of our loaded tester, equipped with an optional hard top and hard top headliner, leather, and heated seats, is a much nicer place to spend time than the previous Wrangler. I wouldn’t go so far as to call the Wrangler Sahara’s cabin luxurious, but it feels premium, with soft, high-quality leather, soft-touch plastics, comfortable seats, and a modern infotainment system.








Arguably Jeep’s biggest challenge with the new 2018 Wrangler was ensuring it hadn’t gone soft on off-road performance. I’m happy to report it hasn’t. I spent a rare rainy Southern California morning exploring the state’s Hungry Valley off-road recreation area. I started out familiarizing myself with the new Wrangler on a particularly easy course that nonetheless required four-low from a couple of Japanese SUVs when I was there recently for an upcoming story. As I motored up the steep hill climb in two-wheel drive, the Jeep started to slip a bit, so I shifted into the Wrangler Sahara’s 4A mode, and it continued up without skipping a beat.

Confident I was familiarized with the new Wrangler’s dimensions, I headed out for more challenging trails.

Call it typical millennial anxiety, but I’m always reluctant going anywhere off-road by myself without the most capable hardware possible. When alone, I rarely go exploring anywhere off-road that I don’t think I can get myself out of, but regardless I still want aggressive, puncture-proof off-road tires, low range, and locking diffs front and back. Despite the Wrangler Sahara’s road-oriented tires and lack of locking diffs, the Jeep never once made me anxious; it easily tackled whatever I threw at it. On the toughest obstacle I faced—a steep, heavily rutted hill climb with loose-packed dirt and mud that frequently put me on three wheels—the Jeep was struggling a bit for grip in 4H, so I shifted down to 4L. In that mode traction control comes off and the electronic brake lock diffs go into action; I could feel the calipers being grabbed as the Jeep routed power to the wheels with most traction, and without any further delay, it motored right on up.

Just about the only place the new 2018 Wrangler can’t match the old is in price. With JK Wranglers already flying off the lots, Jeep upped prices across the board on its new JL Wrangler. Prices for the 2018 Wrangler Unlimited Sahara start at $38,540 for a soft-top, six-speed manual-equipped version. Our nearly loaded tester stickered for $50,220—though it’s worth noting if you spec an identical Wrangler Sahara on Jeep’s configurator the cost has crept higher, to $51,115, due to some option package changes. A similarly equipped 2018 Wrangler JK Unlimited Sahara will set you back $45,640, a $5,475 difference. That’s a significant price increase, but given how much nicer the new Wrangler drives and the newfound interior quality, it’s worth the premium.

After all—this Jeep is the first Wrangler to actually be as nice to drive on the road as it is off. The 2018 Jeep Wrangler has some pretty big shoes to fill and some competing goals to accomplish, but Jeep’s absolutely nailed it. Welcome to the 21st century, Wrangler.

2018 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara
BASE PRICE $38,540
PRICE AS TESTED $50,220
VEHICLE LAYOUT Front-engine, 4WD, 5-pass, 4-door SUV
ENGINE 3.6L/285-hp/260-lb-ft DOHC 24-valve V-6
TRANSMISSION 8-speed automatic
CURB WEIGHT (F/R DIST) 4,391 lb (52/48%)
WHEELBASE 118.4 in
LENGTH x WIDTH x HEIGHT 188.4 x 73.8 x 73.6 in
0-60 MPH 6.9 sec
QUARTER MILE 15.3 sec @ 89.9 mph
BRAKING, 60-0 MPH 128 ft
LATERAL ACCELERATION 0.73 g (avg)
MT FIGURE EIGHT 28.3 sec @ 0.58 g (avg)
EPA CITY/HWY/COMB FUEL ECON 18/23/20 mpg
ENERGY CONS, CITY/HWY 187/147 kW-hrs/100 miles
CO2 EMISSIONS, COMB 0.97 lb/mile

































































































































































































































































































The post 2018 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara First Test: Duality appeared first on Motor Trend.

Source: http://ift.tt/JPPTFe

2018 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara First Test: Duality

Revamping an icon is never easy, especially when that icon’s history is as storied as the Jeep Wrangler’s. I’ll spare you the details that you (probably) already know, but the all-new 2018 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara, in all of its heated leather seats and Apple CarPlay glory, is the modern day descendent of the World War II Jeeps that helped roll back totalitarianism in Europe in Asia.

Basically, the new 2018 Wrangler has some pretty big shoes to fill. And a lot of boxes to check, too.

Code-named JL, the new Wrangler replaces the decade-old but beloved JK-series Wrangler. Associate editor Scott Evans did an excellent job digging into all the changes, big and small, made to the 2018 Wrangler in his First Look and First Drive, so I’ll keep things brief. Basically, the Wrangler is new from its axles and frame on up to its three new (still removable) roof options. Jeep’s goal for the new 2018 Wrangler is to balance the dueling demands of those who buy Wranglers to adventure off-road and those who buy ’em to drive around town because they look cool. Of the three versions of the new Wrangler on sale (Sport, Sahara, and Rubicon), none sums this duality up better than the luxury- and street-oriented Sahara.




With the Wrangler Rubicon expected to capture the hardcore off-roaders and the Wrangler Sport serving as the jack-of-all-trades entry into the lineup, the Wrangler Sahara is aimed mostly at buyers who prefer streets to slick rock. Its standard features and options list reflects that. Standard are four doors (every other Wrangler variant is also available with two doors), street-oriented tires, chrome accents, and body-color fender flares that’d get pinstriped off-road. The Wrangler Sahara’s option list is long, but notable is a Sahara-exclusive Selec-Trac full-time four-wheel-drive system, which is ideal for those only using their Jeep’s four-wheel-drive system in inclement weather.

Aside from the optional Selec-Trac transfer case, the 2018 Wrangler Sahara shares the rest of its powertrain with its Sport and Rubicon stablemates. Under the hood is a retuned version of the JK Wrangler’s 3.6-liter V-6, in the Sahara making 285 hp and 260 lb-ft of torque. A six-speed manual is standard, but our tester is equipped with an optional eight-speed automatic. A new 2.0-liter turbocharged I-4 making 268 hp and 295 lb-ft of torque is optional, and a 3.0-liter turbodiesel V-6 is expected to join the lineup next year.








At the track, the 10 years (and roughly 200 pounds) separating the new Wrangler from the old JK model is readily apparent. Stomp on the accelerator, and the 2018 Wrangler Sahara accelerates from 0 to 60 mph in 6.9 seconds and goes through the quarter mile in 15.3 seconds at 89.9 mph. That’s a drastic improvement over the last JK Jeep we tested, a 2016 Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon equipped with a soft top and five-speed auto. It needed 8.2 seconds to hit 60 mph and 16.3 seconds to get through the quarter at 82.5 mph. The new Jeep stops and turns way better than the old one, too. It’s best 60–0-mph performance was 128 feet, and it lapped our figure-eight course in a respectable 28.3 seconds at 0.58 g average. The 2018 Wrangler beats the old one at the pump, too; it’s EPA-rated at 18/23/20 mpg city/highway/combined versus 16/20/18 mpg. In our mixed testing, we averaged an indicated 19.7 mpg.

The performance improvements seen at the track are even more apparent out on the road in the real world.

I spent the week leading up to testing the 2018 Wrangler driving around in my mom’s two-door auto-equipped 2015 Wrangler Polar Edition, and the difference between JK and JL Wrangler is like the difference between cheeseburger and a rib-eye steak—both are still good, but you’d rather have the rib-eye, wouldn’t you?








Whereas the old Wrangler was charmingly sluggish and rough around the edges, the new Jeep drives like a modern pickup. It still feels like a Jeep, yes, but the ride is buttoned-down and forgiving, the front end doesn’t wander waywardly over bumps, and the Wrangler’s steering, although still a slow ratio for off-roading, is well-weighted and accurate on the road.

The Wrangler’s new eight-speed automatic significantly livens up Jeep’s 3.6-liter V-6, too. The new eight-speed shifts quickly and unobtrusively and is happy to hold a lower gear going uphill during passing or downhill to help you maintain speed. Finally freed of the boat anchor five-speed, the V-6 feels quick and athletic, with plenty of passing power on tap. I’m told you’ll want that optional 2.0-liter engine if you drive it, but if you never bother I think most will be satisfied with the V-6.

The new transmission also has the added benefit of helping make the Wrangler’s cabin quieter than before by keeping engines rev lower. The cabin of our loaded tester, equipped with an optional hard top and hard top headliner, leather, and heated seats, is a much nicer place to spend time than the previous Wrangler. I wouldn’t go so far as to call the Wrangler Sahara’s cabin luxurious, but it feels premium, with soft, high-quality leather, soft-touch plastics, comfortable seats, and a modern infotainment system.








Arguably Jeep’s biggest challenge with the new 2018 Wrangler was ensuring it hadn’t gone soft on off-road performance. I’m happy to report it hasn’t. I spent a rare rainy Southern California morning exploring the state’s Hungry Valley off-road recreation area. I started out familiarizing myself with the new Wrangler on a particularly easy course that nonetheless required four-low from a couple of Japanese SUVs when I was there recently for an upcoming story. As I motored up the steep hill climb in two-wheel drive, the Jeep started to slip a bit, so I shifted into the Wrangler Sahara’s 4A mode, and it continued up without skipping a beat.

Confident I was familiarized with the new Wrangler’s dimensions, I headed out for more challenging trails.

Call it typical millennial anxiety, but I’m always reluctant going anywhere off-road by myself without the most capable hardware possible. When alone, I rarely go exploring anywhere off-road that I don’t think I can get myself out of, but regardless I still want aggressive, puncture-proof off-road tires, low range, and locking diffs front and back. Despite the Wrangler Sahara’s road-oriented tires and lack of locking diffs, the Jeep never once made me anxious; it easily tackled whatever I threw at it. On the toughest obstacle I faced—a steep, heavily rutted hill climb with loose-packed dirt and mud that frequently put me on three wheels—the Jeep was struggling a bit for grip in 4H, so I shifted down to 4L. In that mode traction control comes off and the electronic brake lock diffs go into action; I could feel the calipers being grabbed as the Jeep routed power to the wheels with most traction, and without any further delay, it motored right on up.

Just about the only place the new 2018 Wrangler can’t match the old is in price. With JK Wranglers already flying off the lots, Jeep upped prices across the board on its new JL Wrangler. Prices for the 2018 Wrangler Unlimited Sahara start at $38,540 for a soft-top, six-speed manual-equipped version. Our nearly loaded tester stickered for $50,220—though it’s worth noting if you spec an identical Wrangler Sahara on Jeep’s configurator the cost has crept higher, to $51,115, due to some option package changes. A similarly equipped 2018 Wrangler JK Unlimited Sahara will set you back $45,640, a $5,475 difference. That’s a significant price increase, but given how much nicer the new Wrangler drives and the newfound interior quality, it’s worth the premium.

After all—this Jeep is the first Wrangler to actually be as nice to drive on the road as it is off. The 2018 Jeep Wrangler has some pretty big shoes to fill and some competing goals to accomplish, but Jeep’s absolutely nailed it. Welcome to the 21st century, Wrangler.

2018 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara
BASE PRICE $38,540
PRICE AS TESTED $50,220
VEHICLE LAYOUT Front-engine, 4WD, 5-pass, 4-door SUV
ENGINE 3.6L/285-hp/260-lb-ft DOHC 24-valve V-6
TRANSMISSION 8-speed automatic
CURB WEIGHT (F/R DIST) 4,391 lb (52/48%)
WHEELBASE 118.4 in
LENGTH x WIDTH x HEIGHT 188.4 x 73.8 x 73.6 in
0-60 MPH 6.9 sec
QUARTER MILE 15.3 sec @ 89.9 mph
BRAKING, 60-0 MPH 128 ft
LATERAL ACCELERATION 0.73 g (avg)
MT FIGURE EIGHT 28.3 sec @ 0.58 g (avg)
EPA CITY/HWY/COMB FUEL ECON 18/23/20 mpg
ENERGY CONS, CITY/HWY 187/147 kW-hrs/100 miles
CO2 EMISSIONS, COMB 0.97 lb/mile

































































































































































































































































































The post 2018 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara First Test: Duality appeared first on Motor Trend.

Source: http://ift.tt/JPPTFe