WRC – Neuville carries advantage into final day

Sport news

Thierry Neuville continues to top the Rally Sweden standings and heads into the closing 52 kilometres of competition on Sunday with a 22.7 second advantage over Craig Breen. Third-placed Andreas Mikkelsen is 32 seconds off the overall lead but still in the thick of a fight with team-mate Hayden Paddon as they scrap for the final podium position.

This afternoon the crews headed back to the forests for a re-run of the same three stages before heading to Karlstad for a second visit to the super special stage. Then, back in Torsby, they had a short blast around the sprint stage in darkness ahead of the overnight halt. Neuville has managed to extend his advantage, two fastest times in the forests enabling him to establish a more comfortable lead after adopting a different tyre strategy. Breen has been enjoying every single stage and, bar a couple of small mistakes, has been consistently quick in the C3 WRC. Mikkelsen has tried to nibble into Breen’s advantage and is 9.3 seconds behind the Citroën driver and also under pressure from behind in the form of team-mate Hayden Paddon, the Kiwi getting to within two-tenths of a second earlier in the day. Paddon had banked on his aggressive car set-up working better this afternoon and he remains close to Mikkelsen’s heels. Mads Østberg also can’t be totally discounted. The Norwegian is fifth but less than 10 seconds further behind having finally found a set-up that gives him more confidence.

Esapekka Lappi, seventh last night, is now sixth, and has been pushing hard although his relative lack of experience on this surface is still holding him back a bit. He will however continue pushing to try and overhaul Østberg who is a matter of seconds ahead. Jari-Matti Latvala, seventh, has dropped further behind Lappi and was falling into the clutches of new team-mate Ott Tänak before the Estonian dropped time trying to pass Kris Meeke who had gone off into a snow bank and was then slowed by a turbo problem which ultimately forced him out. As such, Tänak slipped off the road passing Meeke, dropping him to ninth behind Teemu Suninen who is still struggling to really get into the groove of the event. Sébastien Ogier is down in 10th, taking the position when Meeke retired. The Frenchman has had little chance of improving his position such is his disadvantage near the front of the field. His team-mate Elfyn Evans is 11th with a better set-up this afternoon. 

Takamoto Katsuta and reigning FIA WRC 2 Champion Pontus Tidemand continue to battle it out for honours in the category but the Japanese driver has managed to fend off the Swede to hold the lead by 12.2 seconds going into the final three stages. Dennis Rådström is however upholding local honours with the lead in the FIA Junior and WRC 3 Championships.

Rally Sweden – Provisional results after Section 6

1.   Thierry Neuville / Nicolas Gilsoul

Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC

2hr 23min 23.8sec

2.   Craig Breen / Scott Martin

Citroën C3 WRC

2hr 23min 46.5sec

3.   Andreas Mikkelsen / Anders Jæger

Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC

2hr 23min 55.8sec

4.   Hayden Paddon / Sebastian Marshall

Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC

2hr 24min 12.4sec

5.   Mads Østberg / Torstein Eriksen

Citroën C3 WRC

2hr 24min 20.6sec

6.   Esapekka Lappi / Janne Ferm

Toyota Yaris WRC

2hr 24min 29.6sec

7.   Jari-Matti Latvala / Miikka Anttila

Toyota Yaris WRC

2hr 25min 27.1sec

8.   Teemu Suninen / Mikko Markkula

Ford Fiesta WRC

2hr 25min 44.3sec

9.   Ott Tänak / Martin Järveoja

Toyota Yaris WRC

2hr 27min 05.1sec

10. Sébastien Ogier/Julien Ingrassia

Ford Fiesta WRC

2hr 27min 48.7sec

World Rally Championship

Rally SwedenWRCWRCSEASON 2018SportRallies1SportWorld Rally ChampionshipRalliesWRCSEASON 2018Rally SwedenWRC01Saturday, February 17, 2018 – 7:29pmSaturday, February 17, 2018 – 7:29pm Source: http://ift.tt/2ynDsjd

The Katana Concept

2017 GSX-S1000F "Katana 3.0"
by Rodolfo Frascoli and Engines Engineering for Motociclismo magazine. 

In Spring 2017, the Motociclismo magazine decided to bring to new life one of the most iconic bikes of the the 80’s: the Suzuki Katana 1100. When, in late 1980, the GSX1100S Katana hit the street for the first time, it was claimed by Suzuki to be the fastest mass-production motorcycle in the world, ensuring the new looks were matched by unprecedented performance levels. The Motociclismo team chose an excellent, but unfortunately not very appealing, GSX-S1000F (146 BHP @ 10,000 RPM) as donor bike and engaged Rodolfo Frascoli, father of beauties like the Triumph Speed Triple and the Guzzi Griso, for the design. The bike was built by Engines Engineering, a boutique factory born in 1979 near Bologna, lead by Eng. Rodolfo Strazzari, specialized in building and testing prototypes. The bike was first introduced last Autumn at EICMA with a certain understatement… Too bad for something that Suzuki should carefully consider…

Nella primavera del 2017, la rivista Motociclismo ha promosso un progetto ambizioso, quello di  ridare vita a una delle più iconiche moto degli anni ottanta: la Suzuki Katana 1100. Quando, alla fine del 1980, la GSX1100S Katana scese in strada per la prima volta, la Suzuki dichiarò che si trattava della più veloce moto di serie del mondo, assicurando che il nuovo look era abbinato a prestazioni senza precedenti. Il team di Motociclismo ha quindi scelto per base una eccellente, ma sfortunatamente poco attraente, GSX-S1000F (146cv @ 10.000 giri) e ha incaricato Rodolfo Frascoli, padre di bellezze come la Triumph Speed Triple e la Guzzi Griso, della progettazione. La moto è stata costruita dalla Engines Engineering, una fabbrica boutique nata nel 1979 nei pressi di Bologna, guidata dall’ing. Rodolfo Strazzari, specializzata nella costruzione e collaudo di prototipi. La moto è stata presentata per la prima volta lo scorso autunno ad EICMA con un certo understatement… Peccato per qualcosa che Suzuki dovrebbe considerare attentamente…

http://www.motociclismo.it/

Source: http://ift.tt/2jgWT4U February 17, 2018 at 08:58PM

Flat Rod

Flat track Harley Street Rod, by HD Lugano

According to Gabriele Gardel the flat track version of the Street Rod could not be yet another copy of the XGR750, currently involved in the American Flat Track championship, but the chance for a European style interpretation of this discipline that is receiving growing interest from riders. The goal was to create a replicable racing version for customers who want to use the Street Rod in the race track. The "Flat-Rod" was built by Giacomo Notarrigo, technical manager of HD Suisse, and Paolo Regazzoni, who have been dealing with H-D customizations for years, using numerous bespoke components. Effectively, the Street rod is a liquid cooled modern bike that hardly is incline to classic interpretation. IMHO, this motard version is probably more in line with the spirit and design of this particular donor bike: approved!
Secondo Gabriele Gardel la versione flat track della Street Rod non poteva essere una ennesima copia della XGR750, attualmente impegnata nel campionato americano Flat Track, ma l’occasione per una rivisitazione in chiave europea di questa disciplina che sta riprendendo piede in modo importante. L’obiettivo è creare una versione racing replicabile per la clientela che intende utilizzare la Street Rod in circuito. La “Flat-Rod” è stata realizzata da Giacomo Notarrigo, responsabile tecnico HD Suisse, e Paolo Regazzoni, che da anni si occupano di customizzazioni H-D con l’utilizzo di numerosi componenti one-off. In effetti, la Street Rod è una moto moderna raffreddata a liquido che a mio avviso poco si presta a interpretazioni di tipo classico. Secondo me, questa versione motard è probabilmente più in linea con lo spirito e il progetto originali di questo specifico modello. Approvata!

https://www.facebook.com/HarleyDavidsonLugano/

Source: http://ift.tt/2jgWT4U February 17, 2018 at 06:15PM

2017 Subaru Legacy Sport Long-Term Update 5: How it Compares to the Updated 2018 Model

In what qualifies as next-level product hype, Subaru gave us a Crimson Red 2018 Legacy 2.5i Sport to drive around for a few weeks last month. After 10 months and nearly 18,000 miles on our gray 2017 model, the bright newness of the 2018 definitely seems a little brighter and shinier.

For 2018, Subaru made some styling changes to the front and rear and added new LED daytime running lights to give the Legacy a “sportier” look. The changes are not radical enough to be considered a redesign, but the tweaks are a positive change.

Under the hood the suspension and electric power steering have been retuned in an attempt to give a smoother ride and enhanced feel when driving, again in an effort to be a little sportier.

The 2018 Subaru Legacy is pictured




Even after a few miles I noticed the ride got quieter in the 2018—an improvement on what was already a pretty smooth and quiet ride with our 2017 long-termer. Credit goes to the redesigned side mirrors and sound-insulating glass. Nice work.

Some tech features have been upgraded or added, including reverse automatic braking, steering-sensitive headlights, and the ability to monitor the pressures for individual tires. Nice incremental upgrades.

But the real star of this refresh rodeo is the overhauled multimedia display, which takes the center of the Legacy from dated to datable.

Although serviceable, the monochrome screen in the 2017 model has been reinvigorated by adding bolder, more colorful icons for the touchscreen’s functions. You notice it right away, and it really livens up the cabin. The small touch goes a long way to making the driving experience more attractive.

Along with the aesthetic makeover, radio and media functions have been tweaked to allow for more intuitive bookmarking and use of the functions you use often.

And to the cheers of many on staff, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto have been added, so you don’t need to untether your phone when driving. Welcome to the club.

Also upgraded are the graphics for the maps, which now look much more contemporary.

So a little something for everyone with this refresh. Styling, safety, and the indoor beautification project could be the difference between passing on the 2017 and jumping feet first into the 2018.

Frankly, we’re a little jealous. Well played, Subaru.








Read more about our 2017 Subaru Legacy Sport:








































The post 2017 Subaru Legacy Sport Long-Term Update 5: How it Compares to the Updated 2018 Model appeared first on Motor Trend.

Source: http://ift.tt/JPPTFe

2017 Subaru Legacy Sport Long-Term Update 5: How it Compares to the Updated 2018 Model

In what qualifies as next-level product hype, Subaru gave us a Crimson Red 2018 Legacy 2.5i Sport to drive around for a few weeks last month. After 10 months and nearly 18,000 miles on our gray 2017 model, the bright newness of the 2018 definitely seems a little brighter and shinier.

For 2018, Subaru made some styling changes to the front and rear and added new LED daytime running lights to give the Legacy a “sportier” look. The changes are not radical enough to be considered a redesign, but the tweaks are a positive change.

Under the hood the suspension and electric power steering have been retuned in an attempt to give a smoother ride and enhanced feel when driving, again in an effort to be a little sportier.

The 2018 Subaru Legacy is pictured




Even after a few miles I noticed the ride got quieter in the 2018—an improvement on what was already a pretty smooth and quiet ride with our 2017 long-termer. Credit goes to the redesigned side mirrors and sound-insulating glass. Nice work.

Some tech features have been upgraded or added, including reverse automatic braking, steering-sensitive headlights, and the ability to monitor the pressures for individual tires. Nice incremental upgrades.

But the real star of this refresh rodeo is the overhauled multimedia display, which takes the center of the Legacy from dated to datable.

Although serviceable, the monochrome screen in the 2017 model has been reinvigorated by adding bolder, more colorful icons for the touchscreen’s functions. You notice it right away, and it really livens up the cabin. The small touch goes a long way to making the driving experience more attractive.

Along with the aesthetic makeover, radio and media functions have been tweaked to allow for more intuitive bookmarking and use of the functions you use often.

And to the cheers of many on staff, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto have been added, so you don’t need to untether your phone when driving. Welcome to the club.

Also upgraded are the graphics for the maps, which now look much more contemporary.

So a little something for everyone with this refresh. Styling, safety, and the indoor beautification project could be the difference between passing on the 2017 and jumping feet first into the 2018.

Frankly, we’re a little jealous. Well played, Subaru.








Read more about our 2017 Subaru Legacy Sport:








































The post 2017 Subaru Legacy Sport Long-Term Update 5: How it Compares to the Updated 2018 Model appeared first on Motor Trend.

Source: http://ift.tt/JPPTFe

2017 Subaru Legacy Sport Long-Term Update 5: How it Compares to the Updated 2018 Model

In what qualifies as next-level product hype, Subaru gave us a Crimson Red 2018 Legacy 2.5i Sport to drive around for a few weeks last month. After 10 months and nearly 18,000 miles on our gray 2017 model, the bright newness of the 2018 definitely seems a little brighter and shinier.

For 2018, Subaru made some styling changes to the front and rear and added new LED daytime running lights to give the Legacy a “sportier” look. The changes are not radical enough to be considered a redesign, but the tweaks are a positive change.

Under the hood the suspension and electric power steering have been retuned in an attempt to give a smoother ride and enhanced feel when driving, again in an effort to be a little sportier.

The 2018 Subaru Legacy is pictured




Even after a few miles I noticed the ride got quieter in the 2018—an improvement on what was already a pretty smooth and quiet ride with our 2017 long-termer. Credit goes to the redesigned side mirrors and sound-insulating glass. Nice work.

Some tech features have been upgraded or added, including reverse automatic braking, steering-sensitive headlights, and the ability to monitor the pressures for individual tires. Nice incremental upgrades.

But the real star of this refresh rodeo is the overhauled multimedia display, which takes the center of the Legacy from dated to datable.

Although serviceable, the monochrome screen in the 2017 model has been reinvigorated by adding bolder, more colorful icons for the touchscreen’s functions. You notice it right away, and it really livens up the cabin. The small touch goes a long way to making the driving experience more attractive.

Along with the aesthetic makeover, radio and media functions have been tweaked to allow for more intuitive bookmarking and use of the functions you use often.

And to the cheers of many on staff, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto have been added, so you don’t need to untether your phone when driving. Welcome to the club.

Also upgraded are the graphics for the maps, which now look much more contemporary.

So a little something for everyone with this refresh. Styling, safety, and the indoor beautification project could be the difference between passing on the 2017 and jumping feet first into the 2018.

Frankly, we’re a little jealous. Well played, Subaru.








Read more about our 2017 Subaru Legacy Sport:








































The post 2017 Subaru Legacy Sport Long-Term Update 5: How it Compares to the Updated 2018 Model appeared first on Motor Trend.

Source: http://ift.tt/JPPTFe