Lexus is Warming Up to the Idea of an LF-A Successor

The Lexus LFA burst onto the scene in 2010, shocking an industry that didn’t expect any car of this status to come out of Lexus and, by extension, Toyota. It only lasted two years in production because of a cap in volume — it was limited to just 500 units — but in that short period, the LFA was able to cement its legacy as one of the most fascinating supercars of its generation. Fast forward to 2018 and there are rumblings that Lexus is finally considering the possibility of developing a model that would serve as the successor of the almighty Lexus supercar.

"Up until this point, the belief was that Lexus was not doing a follow-up to the LFA supercar"

Well, this is a major development. Up until this point, the belief was that Lexus was not doing a follow-up to the LFA supercar. Back in 2016, Lexus Europe boss, Alain Uyttenhoven, hinted that a successor to the LFA wasn’t in the company’s immediate plans. "The LFA is an icon now and possibly always – we don’t need to replace it to keep that status,” he said. “It is a car we can reference for another 25 years if we choose. Its status is assured.”

Granted, a lot of things can change in the course of two years. That appears to be the case here because incessant public demand has made Lexus reconsider its earlier position regarding a potential successor to the supercar.

"There’s no telling what the company’s decision-makers are talking about, but for what it’s worth, the idea that a successor to the LFA is “not a closed door” anymore is enough to get a lot of people excited, myself included."

Lexus Group Vice President and General Manager Jeff Bracken commented on the changing winds within Lexus telling Carbuzz at the Detroit Auto Show that discussions about an LFA successor are no longer open-shut cases. “I wouldn’t rule it out,” he said. “I think that when we hear so many emotional and a high number of requests for a follow-up to LFA, we certainly won’t ignore that. It’s not a closed door.”

For now, that’s all Lexus appears to be willing to divulge. There’s no telling what the company’s decision-makers are talking about, but for what it’s worth, the idea that a successor to the LFA is “not a closed door” anymore is enough to get a lot of people excited, myself included.

References

Lexus LFA

Read our full review on the 2011 Lexus LFA.

Read more Lexus news.

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Hyundai Veloster N Isn’t Interested in Nurburgring Titles

The Hyundai Veloster N was a surprise attendee at the 2018 Detroit Auto Show. A lot of people weren’t expecting to see it but were thankful anyway when they did.
As the second model to get the N performance treatment, the Veloster N is a lot of things. It’s fast, engaging, and a lot of fun to drive. One thing it isn’t, though, is record-breaking. It’s not breaking any lap records at the Nurburgring because it wasn’t developed to do so. That strategy was intentional because, in Hyundai’s eyes, Nurburgring lap records are "a waste of time."

""We developed it for driving fun, for nice challenging mountain roads or a tiny challenging race track""

If history has shown us anything, it’s that there are more than enough ways to determine the essence of “fun” when driving a hot hatchback. Some automakers prefer record-breaking speed on the track. Some automakers prefer a more laid-back hot hatch that’s more suitable on the open road.

Based on what Hyundai’s saying, the Veloster N fits more into the latter category. "Driving enjoyment is the whole point of an N car," Albert Biermann, president and head of Performance Development and High-Performance Vehicle Division, Hyundai Motor Group, told Road and Track. "We developed it for driving fun, for nice challenging mountain roads or a tiny challenging race track. We don’t care about lap times. If you’re going for lap times, the aero settings are different, the suspension setting is different. It’s faster for a professional driver, but it’s not as enjoyable. We don’t care for that. We want many people to enjoy this N experience, people who might not have driven a sporty car before."

Biermann’s position is valid because the pursuit of record lap times at the ‘Ring is just one aspect of a hot hatch’s appeal. It doesn’t define what the car is capable of when it’s out on the streets or on challenging mountain roads. So in lieu of turning the Veloster N into a Nurburgring conqueror, Hyundai opted to put its focus on giving the hot hatch top-shelf dynamic responsiveness, the kind that makes it easy for customers to play with the car in any type of setting.

"As alluring as a lap record in the world’s most famous race track sounds, it doesn’t define what a hot hatchback should be."

Some people may not like Hyundai’s approach with the Veloster N, but it is good to see a company that isn’t blinded by the mystique of a Nurburgring lap record. It shows that Hyundai is thinking of bigger and more important things to give to its new hot hatch. As alluring as a lap record in the world’s most famous race track sounds, it doesn’t define what a hot hatchback should be. Drivability, engagement, and enjoyment do.

These aspects can be seen on the road, away from stopwatches and onboard videos. This is where Hyundai put its focus in developing the Veloster N. It’s the absolute right call to make because it sends a statement to the business that there’s more to the Veloster N than the glitz and glamour of a Nurburgring lap record.

References

Hyundai Veloster

Hyundai Veloster Brings N Performance to U.S. for 2019!

Hyundai Veloster Gets Much-Needed Redesign, but What’s with the Lancer Evo Face?

Read more Detroit Auto Show news.

Read more Hyundai news.

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Ford Mustang Bullitt

Arguably one of the most iconic Mustang of all time, the Bullitt returns into showrooms five decades after the original car helped make the best chase seen in movie history. It was 1968 when Steve McQueen drove a Mustang GT390 Fastback like there was no tomorrow on the streets of San Francisco in the "Bullitt" movie, which will celebrate its 50th anniversary in October 2018. To mark the event, Ford prepared a new iteration of the Mustang Bullitt for the first time since 2009. The car was unveiled at the 2018 Detroit Motor Show alongside the original version, and it’s the most menacing Bullitt ever made.

Set to go on sale in the summer of 2018, the new Mustang Bullitt walks in the footsteps of its predecessors. It’s based on the Mustang GT, it features a host of unique features inside and out, and it has a subtle appearance. But under the skin, the Bullitt packs a bit more oomph than the GT and delivers better performance. If Steve McQueen was still around, I’m sure he would’ve taken one home and maybe even use it for a sequel to the iconic movie. But unfortunately Steve is no more, so we’ll have to settle for the cool, Bullitt-inspired commercial Ford made for the car. Check it out below.

Continue reading to learn more about the Ford Mustang Bullitt.

Exterior

  • Includes all 2018 Mustang updates
  • Iconic Dark Highland Green color
  • Exclusive grille design
  • 19-inch Torque Thrust wheels
  • Black exhaust pipes
  • Red brake calipers
  • Faux gas cap on rear fascia
"The new Bullitt benefits from all the new design features of the mid-cycle facelift Mustang"

Based on the recently unveiled 2018 Mustang, the Bullitt benefits from all the new design features of the mid-cycle facelift pony car. Highlights include redesigned headlamps with LED, reshaped front grille, new diffuser, and revised taillights. In addition to the above, the Bullitt gets its own unique features, most of them based on the styling cues of the original movie car.

Up front, we can see a new grille design with a honeycomb-pattern, black mesh. There’s no pony logo, but Ford added subtle chrome accents on the upper frame. Onto the sides, we can see the usual Torque Thrust wheels, also based on the original car and seen on previous iterations of the Bullitt. On this car, they measure 19 inches and are made from aluminum. Behind them, red-painted Brembo brake calipers add a dash of color.

Around back, the Bullitt gets the revised diffuser that comes with Premium Package, which is standard on this special edition, a circular faux gas cap with the Bullitt logo on the rear fascia, and new Black NitroPlate exhaust tips. Speaking of colors, the new Bullitt can be ordered in just two exterior paints. There’s Dark Highland Green, a modern, metallic version of the original movie car’s shade, and Shadow Black.

Interior

  • Standard Premium Package
  • Leather upholstery
  • Premium display
  • Upgraded audio system
  • Navigation and cruise control
  • Green accent stitching
  • White cue ball shift knob
  • Custom start up screen
  • Optional Recaro seats
"The interior is pretty much standard GT spec with additional standard features and a few unique bits"

The interior is pretty much standard GT spec with additional standard features and a few unique bits. The vehicle is equipped with the Premium Package as standard, which adds leather upholstery, the bigger display for the infotainment system, ambient lighting, aluminum pedals, satin brush aluminum on the center stack, an upgraded sound system, navigation, adaptive cruise control, and rain-sensing wipers.

Ford also offers a heated, leather steering wheel as standard, alongside the 12-inch, all-digital instrument cluster from the facelifted, 2018 Mustang. Bullitt-specific features include green accent stitching on the dashboard, door panels, center console, and seats, and a white cue ball shift knob as a nod to the original car. The infotainment system has a unique start screen in green with an image of the car rather than the pony.

The options list includes a set of leather-trimmed Recaro seats and the Bullitt Electronics Package. The latter includes driver memory seats and mirrors and Blind Spot Information System with Cross-Traffic Alert that can alert customers of vehicles detected in difficult-to-see places, among other features.

Drivetrain

  • Upgraded 5.0-liter V-8
  • At least 475 horsepower
  • Manual transmission
  • Active valve system
  • Retuned exhaust
  • Open air indusction
  • Shelby GT350 intake manifold
  • Performance Package features
  • Optional MagneRide suspension
"The naturally aspirated V-8 gained a few revised internals for enhanced performance"

Just like its predecessors, the new Bullitt gets its juice from an updated version of the GT’s 5.0-liter V-8. The naturally aspirated unit gained a few revised internals for enhanced performance and remains exclusive to this special edition. Final output figures have yet to be announced, but Ford did say that the engine cranks out "at least" 475 horsepower and 420 pound-feet of torque. That’s 15 extra horses compared to the standard GT, while torque is identical, but expect the final spec sheet to include a bit more pound-feet as well.

The V-8 mates to a manual transmission only, with no option for an automatic. Ford also added an active valve performance system, while the exhaust was retuned to give the engine a signature burble. Other upgrades include an Open Air Induction system, intake manifold with 87mm throttle bodies from the Shelby GT350, and a recalibrated powertrain control module.

"Upgrades include an Open Air Induction system and intake manifold from the Shelby GT350"

More updates come from the Performance Package, which is standard on this model. The bundle adds update springs, bushings, shocks, and a rear sway bar. It also includes an upgraded strut tower brace, bigger brakes, updated rear gear ratio, and a Torsen differential.

Optionally, the Mustang Bullitt can be equipped with the MagneRide semi-active suspension system for optimized driving performance.

For has yet to release performance figures, but the Bullitt could be a tenth-second quicker than the Mustang GT with the manual transmission thanks to the extra oomph. Top speed for this model is rated at 163 mph, an eight mph increase over the Mustang GT.

Prices

Pricing information is not yet available, but it’s safe to assume that the Bullitt will cost more than the Mustang GT Premium. The latter retails from $39,095, so look for the Bullitt to cost at least $45,000 before options.

Competition

Chevrolet Camaro

The Mustang GT’s most important competitor right now is the Chevrolet Camaro SS. But unlike the Mustang, the Camaro doesn’t have an iconic movie to brag about. At least not as famous as the Bullitt model. Sure, there’s the Camaro Bumblebee from Transformers, but Chevrolet has yet to turn it into a production model. The regular Camaro SS isn’t a bad option though .It’s styling is decidedly aggressive and modern, while the interior comes with plenty of premium features and can be customized in numerous ways. Output is solid too, with the 6.2-liter V-8 rated at 455 horsepower and 455 pound-feet of torque. That’s at least 20 horses below the Bullitt, but the Camaro SS benefits from notably more torque. And if you’re not a fan of manual transmissions, you can have the SS with an eight-speed automatic too. Pricing for the SS starts from $37,900, but the better equipped 2SS trim comes in at $42,900 before options.

Read our full review of the 2017 Chevrolet Camaro.

Dodge Challenger

Yes, the Dodge Challenger is very long in the tooth and its rather big and heavy for a modern pony car, but the nameplate is a traditional competitor for the Mustang and it can’t be ignored. Its design is still appealing if you like massive-looking muscle cars, and while the interior isn’t as fancy, the Challenger is a solid option when it comes to performance. Granted, the 5.7-liter V-8 isn’t as exciting with just 375 horsepower and 410 pound-feet at its disposal, but the 6.4-liter Hemi V-8 trumps the Bullitt’s 5.0-liter with a whopping 485 horses and 475 pound-effect. It significantly slower from 0 to 60 mph (4.4 seconds) due to the heavier curb weight, but top speed is superior to the Bullitt at 182 mph. But it’s more affordable, with the least expensive model using the 6.4-liter Hemi, the R/T Scat Pack, costing $39,995. You can get the same drivetrain in the 392 Scat Pack Shaker and T/A 392 at $42,795 and $44,995, respectively.

Read our full story of the 2017 Dodge Challenger.

Mustang Bullit Timeline

  • Original car built in 1968
  • Revived in 2001
  • Previous model launched in 2008
  • All modern cars have similar updates
"It was only in 2001 that FoMoCo built the first special-edition Bullitt model"

While the original Bullitt became famous in 1968, Ford didn’t do much to benefit from all the hype production-wise. It was only in 2001 that FoMoCo built the first special-edition Bullitt model for the fourth-generation pony car. Developed in partnership with Warner Bros, it featured a large hood scoop, new side scoops, revised lower body moldings, and a unique rear side window shape. Ford also deleted the spoiler and the foglamps for a cleaner look closer to the original car. Aluminum pedals and shifter and vintage-looking upholstery rounded off the interior.

Under the hood, the GT’s V-8 received a new intake, high-flow mufflers, and special underdrive pulleys that helped increase power to 265 horsepower. The torque curve was also improved, helping the Bullitt cover the quarter mile in almost three tenths quicker than the regular GT. New suspension features improved handling, while the Mustang Cobra brakes and Goodyear performance tires provided better stopping power. Available in Dark Highland Green, True Blue, and Black only, the first Bullitt was a 2001-model-year car only, with production ended after 5,582 units.

"The Bullitt name was revived in 2008, during the production cycle of the fifth-generation Mustang"

The Bullitt name was revived in 2008, during the production cycle of the fifth-generation Mustang. Exterior features were similar to the first version, unique wheels and grille, and decklid spoiler and badge delete. Inside, Ford added bespoke door sills, gauges, and steering wheel cap, an aluminum dash panel, aluminum shift knob and pedals, and GT500-inspired front seats and steering wheel.

Drivetrain-wise, the second Bullitt featured an open-element air filter, a unique exhaust that mimics the sound of Steve McQueen’s car and big, 3.5-inch tips. The V-8 was tweaked to deliver 315 horsepower (an extra 15 horses compared to the GT), while the Tremec five-speed manual got a 3.73:1 ratio. These updates dropped 0-to-60 mph times to 4.9 seconds from the GT’s 5.2 ticks. Unlike it’s predecessor, this Bullitt model remained in production for two model years, until 2009.

Conclusion

Granted, the Mustang Bullitt is far from being as spectacular as the GT350 or the upcoming GT500 in terms of features and performance, but I’m happy to see it return into dealerships as a special edition model. It may not have the outrageous output of a supercharged GT500, but it comes with all the heritage in the world and a design that matches the GT390 that Steve McQueen himself drove back in the late 1960s. Original Bullitt Mustangs are hard to get since Ford made only a couple of them, so fans have to settle for newer models. The ones based on the fourth- and fifth-generation Mustangs are also cool, but this new iteration not only looks better, but performs better as well. Welcome back, Mr. Cool!

  • Love it
    • * Inspired by original car
    • * Unique features inside and out
    • * Upgraded drivetrain
  • Leave it
    • * Only two exterior colors
    • * Not exactly affordable

References

Ford Mustang

The 2019 Ford Mustang Bullitt Is Custom Exterior Done Right

New Ford Mustang Bullitt Is Mean and Green in Detroit

Read our full review on the 2008 Ford Mustang Bullitt.

Read more Detroit Auto Show news.

Read more Ford news.

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Pirelli Has Six Different Tire Options for the Lamborghini Urus

Mixes Aventador and Huracan with SUV tradition

The Lamborghini Urus is not your standard SUV so it’s not beholden to standard industry practices. That’s the case when it comes to choosing tires for the Lambo SUV. Whereas most tire makers prepare up to around two to three tire options for the standard SUVs, Pirelli doubled that number to six different tire options for the Urus to account for the SUV’s performance capabilities.

"This led to the development of six different tire choices that fall under P Zero, P Zero Corsa, and Scorpion tires."

In all seriousness, we’re not being sarcastic when we refer to the Lamborghini Urus as a “special” SUV. It really fits the mold of one because it’s essentially a supercar hiding in SUV clothing. We can all agree on that.

By its nature, the Urus requires a special kind of attention, something Pirelli admittedly had a “technical challenge” dealing with. As popular as SUVs have become, there’s still only one model that counts as a super SUV. So Pirelli did the only thing it could do under this particular set of circumstances. The Italian tire maker developed a tire compound and tread pattern design that would be suitable for the Urus’ performance capabilities. This led to the development of six different tire choices that fall under P Zero, P Zero Corsa, and Scorpion tires.

"According to Pirelli, the P Zero was designed for use in a performance environment."

According to Pirelli, the P Zero was designed for use in a performance environment. The P Zero Corsa, on the other hand, was developed for “on-track adrenaline,” which basically means that these are the tires that the Urus should use if it finds itself n a race track setting. Then there’s the “Scorpion,” which Pirelli describes as the most “extreme” set among the three tire options. If you ever want to use the Urus in the outdoors, this is the set of tires that you need to use. All told, Pirelli’s alloy wheel options are available in sizes ranging from 21 to 23 inches.

Pirelli hasn’t said how much a set of these tires are going to cost, but considering the vehicle that it’s going to be used on, you’ll need to prepare to spend well into the four figures for a complete set.

References

Lamborghini Urus

Read our full review on the 2019 Lamborghini Urus.

Read more Lamborghini news.

Source: http://ift.tt/2te9DkD

2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster First Ride Review


2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster

Editor Score: 85.5%

Engine 18.5/20
Suspension/Handling 13.5/15
Transmission/Clutch 9.0/10
Brakes 8.5/10
Instruments/Controls 4.0/5
Ergonomics/Comfort 7.75/10
Appearance/Quality 8.5/10
Desirability 8.0/10
Value 7.75/10
Overall Score 85.5/100

The Bonneville family continues to expand with its 2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster. The new Speedmaster builds on the Bobber and Bonneville lines to offer a versatile cruiser with a level of refinement and finish that has become synonymous with Triumph’s recent model releases.

2017 Triumph Bonneville Bobber First Ride Review

2018 Triumph Bonneville Bobber Black First Ride Review

Triumph continues to release additional models with its 1200cc “High-Torque” parallel-Twin engine, and it’s easy to see why. The SOHC, 8-valve engine with the 270-degree firing interval is an excellent beating heart to any of these new motorcycles.

Triumph claims 77 hp at 6,100 rpm and 78 lb-ft of torque at 4,000. This power and torque is spread on smooth with a near flawless ride-by-wire system which only seems to have slight abruptness at low rpm during on/off throttle inputs. The 270-degree crank helps emit a low exhaust note that sounds even more appealing as the revs climb. Couple that charming engine with a smooth, positively actuating transmission, and you have a solid base for any kind of motorcycle you want to build around it. The torque-assist clutch also allows for a light lever pull which was never found to be tiring when putting around town or while lane-sharing.

2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster

The 2018 Triumph Speedmaster shares suspension components with the original Bobber, now tweaked for the potential of two-up riding. The 41mm KYB cartridge-style fork has been outfitted with stiffer dual-rate springs, while the rear mono-shock also includes a heavier spring and adjustable preload. Although we didn’t have a chance to test the motorcycle with a passenger, I thoroughly enjoyed the stiffer fork, and the motorcycle seemed very well balanced throughout the ride. Bumps, abrupt changes in line selection, and freeway riding were all soaked up with ease and stability.

2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster

With a 130 front and 150 rear tire, and a heavier overall weight when compared to the Bobber Black, it would be easy to think the Speedmaster’s handling could be negatively affected. Fortunately, that doesn’t seem to be the case. The Speedmaster feels amazingly light yet stable when being flicked back and forth considering its specs. Its sporting character is mostly limited by cornering clearance, which will leave you scraping pegs corner after corner.

2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster

At our first roundabout, I found myself dragging the pegs and concurrently shattering a reflector next to the painted lines on the road.

The dual 310mm front rotors slowed by Brembo twin-piston calipers provide excellent stopping power. Hard braking is confidence inspiring with the well-damped fork. Out back, the Speedmaster uses a 255mm single rotor and single-pot Nissin caliper. ABS is standard and is unable to be disengaged.

2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster

Hi-viz yellow extended mudguard not U.S. Spec.

Styling is unmistakably Triumph. Pricing starts at $13,150 for Jet Black, while Cranberry Red will cost an additional $250. All models come with 32-spoke wire wheels adding to the classic appeal. The model we tested retails at $13,650, with the Fusion White/Phantom Black colorway adding $500 to MSRP. The white and black on the tank are separated by a hand-painted gold coach line which lends a premium quality to the Speedmaster.

Inside Triumph: Top 10 Tidbits Learned Behind The Factory Doors

2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster

Most of the Bonneville line combines just the right amount of modernity with retro styling, and the Speedmaster is no different.

While the visual impression is classic British custom, the technology is modern, all while being cleverly tucked away and masked. Some of my complaints with bikes such as the new Kawasaki Z900RS are that they are too much a mashup of futuristic styling and classic components. I prefer the mostly classic look with slight nuances of modern tech as seen on most of Triumph’s modern classics range.

2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster

All lighting on the Speedmaster is LED, including the daytime running light which lets you know this isn’t a bike from the ’60s. Other than that, you may be hard-pressed to notice the modern accoutrements.

2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster

The Speedmaster uses a single-clock instrument to house all of the information needed, such as a fuel gauge, trip meters, odometer, average and current gas mileage, while using an analog speedometer. The tech doesn’t stop there. The ride-by-wire controls bring two engine maps: Road and Rain, both of which offer full horsepower, with the latter offering smoother power delivery. Traction control is switchable on or off via the information screen. The Speedmaster also comes standard with cruise control actuated by a single button on the left control module. One press to turn it on, one press to set, and one press for off. Easy as it comes. There is also an immobilizer in the key in case someone happens to knick your precious Trumpet.

2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster

To make your Speedmaster yours, Triumph offers an accessory catalog that is ever-expanding as the Bonneville line-up grows. Don’t have the time to pick out each individual part? Triumph has put together two “inspiration packages” which give the Speedmaster more touring capability or attitude.

2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster

The Highway kit, aimed to enhance the bike’s touring capability, will retail for $2,225 and includes a waxed cotton & leather pannier set, adjustable touring screen, comfort rider seat, matching wider passenger seat, and a host of chrome features including engine bars, passenger backrest, luggage rack and a polished machined oil filler cap.

2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster

The inspiration kit that inspired me though, was the Maverick – which is meant to give the Speedmaster a more stripped-back aggressive styling closer to that of the Bobber Black. The Maverick kit includes a brown quilted single seat set-up, flat handlebars, black Vance & Hines exhaust and other details, including a blacked-out oil filler cap, and a grabrail-removal kit and rear mudguard finisher for a stylish, minimal rear end.

2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster

The 2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster is a solid British cruiser built on a proven chassis around an exciting engine. While a little extra finesse is needed in corners to counteract the minimal cornering clearance, the Speedmaster is just as easily and confidently ridden aggressively as it is adept at cruising down the highway.

All Things Triumph On Motorcycle.com

Interested in the Bobber but want the versatility of two-up riding? The 2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster might be the goldilocks option for you.

2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster
+ Highs

  • Strong front brake
  • Well balanced suspension
  • Both of those combined with the 1200cc HT engine make the Speedmaster fun to ride fast
– Sighs

  • Peg feelers feel the ground all too often
  • Swept back “Beach Bars” put wrists at an awkward angle some may find uncomfortable
  • Slight abruptness from RbW throttle at low rpm

In Gear

Helmet: Bell Star Race Starting at $699.99
Jacket: Dainese Heston $679.95 (No longer in production)
Gloves: Alpinestars Robinson Glove $89.95
Boots: Red Wing Iron Ranger $319.99

2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster Specifications
Price $13,150 for Jet Black / $13,400 for Cranberry Red / $13,650 for Fusion White and Phantom Black
Engine Type Liquid-cooled SOHC Parallel twin cylinder; Four valves per cylinder
Bore and stroke 97.6mm x 80mm
Capacity 1200cc
Power (claimed) 77 hp at 6,100 rpm
Torque (claimed) 78.2 lb-ft at 4,000 rpm
Fuel system Multipoint sequential electronic fuel injection
Final Drive X-ring Chain
Front Suspension 41mm non-adjustable KYB Cartridge fork; 3.5-in travel
Rear Suspension KYB Mono-shock with linkage and preload adjustment; 2.9-in travel
Front Brakes Dual 310mm discs with two-piston axial mounted Brembo calipers; ABS
Rear brake Single 255mm disc with single-piston axial mounted Nissin caliper; ABS
Wheels and Tires Wire spoked steel rims; Front: 2.5”x16” Rear: 3.5”x16” Avon Cobra
Front: 130/90 B16  Rear: 150/80 R16
Saddle height 27.8 inches
Rake 25.3-degrees
Trail 3.6 inches
Wheelbase 59.4 inches
Dry Weight 541 lbs (claimed)
Fuel Capacity 3.2 gallons

2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster
2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster
2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster
2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster
2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster
2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster
2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster
2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster
2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster

2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster
2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster
2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster
2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster
2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster
2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster
2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster
2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster

2018 Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster First Ride Review appeared first on Motorcycle.com.

Source: http://ift.tt/Xzx9iy January 19, 2018 at 02:39AM

Pirelli Has Six Different Tire Options for the Lamborghini Urus

Mixes Aventador and Huracan with SUV tradition

The Lamborghini Urus is not your standard SUV so it’s not beholden to standard industry practices. That’s the case when it comes to choosing tires for the Lambo SUV. Whereas most tire makers prepare up to around two to three tire options for the standard SUVs, Pirelli doubled that number to six different tire options for the Urus to account for the SUV’s performance capabilities.

"This led to the development of six different tire choices that fall under P Zero, P Zero Corsa, and Scorpion tires."

In all seriousness, we’re not being sarcastic when we refer to the Lamborghini Urus as a “special” SUV. It really fits the mold of one because it’s essentially a supercar hiding in SUV clothing. We can all agree on that.

By its nature, the Urus requires a special kind of attention, something Pirelli admittedly had a “technical challenge” dealing with. As popular as SUVs have become, there’s still only one model that counts as a super SUV. So Pirelli did the only thing it could do under this particular set of circumstances. The Italian tire maker developed a tire compound and tread pattern design that would be suitable for the Urus’ performance capabilities. This led to the development of six different tire choices that fall under P Zero, P Zero Corsa, and Scorpion tires.

"According to Pirelli, the P Zero was designed for use in a performance environment."

According to Pirelli, the P Zero was designed for use in a performance environment. The P Zero Corsa, on the other hand, was developed for “on-track adrenaline,” which basically means that these are the tires that the Urus should use if it finds itself n a race track setting. Then there’s the “Scorpion,” which Pirelli describes as the most “extreme” set among the three tire options. If you ever want to use the Urus in the outdoors, this is the set of tires that you need to use. All told, Pirelli’s alloy wheel options are available in sizes ranging from 21 to 23 inches.

Pirelli hasn’t said how much a set of these tires are going to cost, but considering the vehicle that it’s going to be used on, you’ll need to prepare to spend well into the four figures for a complete set.

References

Lamborghini Urus

Read our full review on the 2019 Lamborghini Urus.

Read more Lamborghini news.

Source: http://ift.tt/2te9DkD

No, Fellas, Cycling Won’t Kill Your Erection

Psst. Want a better sex life without resorting to sketchy, email-spammed supplements? Get your butt on a bike four or more days a week.

That’s right: a bike. Contrary to stubbornly persistent misinformation, cycling can actually benefit erectile function in males, and riders who log more miles score better in the lab (and perhaps elsewhere) than those who cycle less frequently, according to the largest study on the topic to date.

RELATED: 6 Ways Cycling Improves Your Sex Life

The multinational study, published last year in the Journal of Urology, compared the urinary and erectile function of 2,774 cyclists, 539 swimmers, and 789 runners. Participants were surveyed on sexual health, prostate symptoms, urinary tract infections, genital numbness, and saddle sores. Cyclists also answered questions about how often and far they rode, what bikes they rode, where they rode, and a host of other variables.

When all the data were analyzed, the cyclists had no more urinary or sexual health problems than swimmers or runners. They did have about twice the incidence of urethral strictures—scarring or narrowing in the urethra—but it wasn’t common and didn’t appear to affect urinary health. Meanwhile, getting out of the saddle frequently (about 20 percent of the time) significantly reduced the chances of experiencing numbness.

RELATED: Should You Get Busy the Night Before a Big Ride?

These results echo the findings of a 2014 study of more than 5,282 male cyclists, which found no connection between cycling and erectile dysfunction or infertility, regardless of how many miles or hours logged on the bike. That included cyclists churning out 200 miles a week. (Check out this Velocio bike jersey for men.)

This isn’t to say that you shouldn’t take steps to protect your man parts on a ride. But the next time someone tells you cycling causes erectile dysfunction, present them with this hard evidence to the contrary.

Take a look at the Levi’s commuter jacket:

Erectile Dysfunction​101755 Source: http://ift.tt/2w5Oysm

The Timbuk2 Rapid Pack Is a Bike Bag That, Finally, Does It All

My favorite backpack is one that I definitely should have tossed three years ago when it was eaten by squirrels at the bottom of a climbing crag. But instead I patched it up, and have used it happily ever since—why? Because it is a good pack. 

The Timbuk2 Rapid Pack ($89 at amazon.com) lacks the frayed edges, mysterious stains (and possible rabies) of my old favorite, but I sense that it has the potential to join its ranks. The Rapid Pack is simple without being basic, light without being flimsy, and has all the right pockets in all the right places. In the last two weeks alone, I’ve used it as a carry on, a bike commuting bag, a hiking pack, and a purse. I’ve even crumpled it up and used it as padding for fragile gear inside a bigger bag. 

Inside the main compartment you’ll find two ample shoe pockets along with one padded pocket across the back for a 13" laptop. This laptop sleeve can also hold a 2L hydration bladder, and a port for the hose near the top of the pack makes it easy to convert into a hydration pack. I generally like to have a hip strap to keep my hydration packs from sloshing around, but the Rapid Pack distributes weight well enough that it could work just fine (as long as you stay on fairly smooth terrain). 

A central external zip pocket is perfectly sized for a wallet, and the two slanted mesh pockets on the sides give you easy access to quick layers (like gloves or a wind jacket) while riding. When you’re done with your commute you can hook your helmet straps through two nearly-invisible loops, which are angled so your lid won’t dangle or swing around. The 14 liter capacity is generous without being unwieldy, and the straps are low-profile and comfortable, if a bit wide-set to fit those with shoulders broader than mine.

RELATED: 11 Awesome Commuter Bags That Make Riding Around Town Easier

One of my favorite features is the checked graphic across the body, which doubles as a reflector in low light. It’s one of those things that doesn’t detract from the look of the pack, but gives you a little peace of mind when you have to stay late at the office.  And if it’s really dark, there’s a hidden loop for a blinky

I don’t know what natural disasters await this pack (hopefully not squirrels), but I can tell already that it’ll be one that I repair and reuse for seasons to come. And for under $100, I think that’s a pretty good deal. 

Photos of the Timbuk2 Rapid Pack

timbuk2 rapid pack bike bag
A little extra padding will make city riding and light off-road excursions more comfy Image courtesy of Timbuk2

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Timbuk2 Rapid Pack Details
Smart, fun details bring more joy to every ride. Image courtesy of Timbuk2

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Timbuk2 Rapid Pack Inside
The Rapid has all the right pockets in all the right places to make storage and organization easy. Image courtesy of Timbuk2

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timbuk2 rapid pack104667 Source: http://ift.tt/2w5Oysm

UCI Chief Calls for Chris Froome’s Suspension Over Drug Test Results

Four-time Tour de France winner Chris Froome should be suspended from Team Sky over an adverse drug test, according to world cycling chief David Lappartient. Froome tested for twice the allowed amount of the asthma medication salbutamol during last year’s Vuelta a España.

"Sky should suspend Froome," Lappartient, president of the UCI, pro cycling’s governing body, told the French newspaper Le Telegramme. "Without wishing to comment on the rider’s guilt, it would be easier for everyone. It’s up to [team manager Dave] Brailsford to take his responsibilities."

"Quite apart from that, I think that’s what the other riders want," Lappartient added. "They’re fed up with the general image."

Lappartient said that regardless of Froome’s innocence or guilt, fans will not give him the benefit of the doubt until he is either exonerated or found to have broken the rules. "In the eyes of the wider public, he’s already guilty," said the UCI chief, who claimed he found out about the test result an hour after being elected to his post over Briton Brian Cookson on September 21.

RELATED: Chris Froome Says He ‘Hasn’t Broken Any Rules’ After Failing Drug Test

"We’re in the hands of the experts," he said. "It’s up to Froome to demonstrate the reasons for such a high level of salbutamol, it’s up to him to prove his innocence."

Regardless, Lappartient believes the affair will last a long time, with the possibility of Froome appealing any eventual sanction to the Court of Arbitration for Sport. "This affair won’t be sorted out in two minutes," he said. "It could last at least a year."

Some of Froome’s main rivals have hit out at cycling authorities for failing to ban the reigning Tour and Vuelta champion. Earlier this week, Frenchman Romain Bardet described cycling as "a laughing stock" over the affair. World time-trial champion Tom Dumoulin previously insisted that his team, Sunweb, would have suspended him for a similar offence.

Bardet even suggested that if Sky doesn’t suspend Froome, the rider himself should voluntarily "pull out" from racing "while waiting for the authorities to decide."

Lappartient said he understood Bardet’s feelings, adding, "He’s saying out loud what everyone’s thinking under their breath."

RELATED: 7 Reasons Why We Can’t Wait for the 2018 Pro Cycling Season

Lappartient said he would look into the issue of therapeutic use exemptions (TUE), which many believe have been abused to allow riders to gain an unfair advantage from legally taking banned substances. He said he wants to put in place "independent medical observation" that would prevent riders from competing if they’ve applied for and been granted a TUE.

"That would allow us to solve the corticosteroids problem," Lappartient said.

In 2016 the Russian hacking group Fancy Bears revealed that Bradley Wiggins, the first Briton to win the Tour de France in 2012 before Froome emulated him a year later, had received three TUEs during his career at crucial moments: before the Tour in 2011 and 2012, and before the Giro d’Italia in 2013.

Wiggins said he needed to take the corticosteroid triamcinolone to treat allergies. But some ex-cyclists have spoken out against that, claiming it would have given him a significant performance boost.

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Chris Froome Facing Suspension​55385 Source: http://ift.tt/2w5Oysm

5 Cities With the Most Badass Winter Bike Commuters

Anyone who follows Jenn Bouma on social media knows what a badass she is. City officials in Minneapolis learned it the hard way after closing part of her commuting route for the winter.

“Recently, we were smacked in the face with some water line maintenance that closed the trail,” Bouma says. “Fortunately, there is a wide shoulder on the highway, but it’s harrowing at times with big trucks buzzing by at 60 to 70 miles per hour. When the snow fell, the route along that highway became extremely sketchy with the shoulder disappearing and cars spinning out next to us. Sadly, we were presented with a sign on the path telling us the path would not be maintained in the wintertime and was closed indefinitely.”

Bouma and other commuters immediately went to work, contacting every city official they could think of. Finally, the parks department relented, not only reopening and maintaining the trail but also creating a temporary hard-pack dirt trail to connect riders to a crosswalk with a light.

According to People For Bikes, nearly 400,000 Minneapolis riders commute via bike each day, including Bouma. She rides the 10 miles to her office every day, no matter the weather.

“The change in the seasons hasn’t affected my commuting; I still do it every day,” Bouma says. “I actually love the super-duper deep freeze in the winter. I love the Spartan landscape of winter. You can see through the trees and all the cool birds of prey along the river are exposed for viewing. It’s quite breathtaking.”

Like most of the commuters profiled, Bouma credits having great gear as one of the reasons why she’s able to keep riding when other commuters reach for their car keys. But not everyone can afford it.

“It can be challenging for folks who don’t have the resources to afford the appropriate gear for being safe in conditions that dip down to 30 below zero at times,” Bouma says. “I educate folks as much as I can on where they can get gear that works at an affordable price. There’s also workshop for winter cycling run by Grease Rag Minneapolis every fall to encourage, educate, and support people of color, women, trans, and femme riders. They are so helpful in answering questions people have, getting folks started, and providing resources.”

Bouma often advises those newbie riders to just ride, even just once a week to start. It will become obvious very quickly what they need to keep doing and what they need to change.

RELATED: 7 Essential Bike Commuting Tips

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