Cathing Up With: Alfonso Albaisa, Head of Nissan/Infiniti design

Alfonso Albaisa, head of Nissan/Infiniti design since spring 2017, has had a surprisingly simple and straightforward career in car design. Nissan was his first automotive employer 35 years ago, and he has been with the firm since. He’s been there through the ups and downs, including a dark period when catastrophically bad management drove it into the purchase/merger fusion with Renault that resulted in the Alliance. Carlos Ghosn, who masterminded Nissan’s revival, says it’s the only “merger of equals” that has actually worked.

Albaisa had run Nissan design outposts in La Jolla, California, and London, England, before moving to headquarters in Japan fairly recently. His succession to Shiro Nakamura, which was carefully orchestrated behind the scenes by Nakamura and Ghosn, came as a bit of a surprise to him. A lot of things in his life have been a surprise to Florida-born Albaisa, 52, whose parents fled Castro’s Cuba early in his regime. “It’s hard for me to realize that a poor Cuban kid could come so far,” he told us at Pebble Beach last summer.

Especially, one might think, for a boy whose youthful behavior might be considered a bit eccentric. “I dressed only in Napoleonic-era costumes when I was a boy,” he says. “Until I was 19, my mother made all my clothes. Then I was impressed by my brother’s grunge style, so I changed to be like him.” Eccentricities aside, Albaisa was always serious about his education and adding to his knowledge. One of his instructors at the Center for Creative Studies in Detroit, which he attended—he graduated from Pratt Institute in New York—eventually talked him into a more conventional presentation, which seems to have stuck. But he has managed to keep the cheerful, fun-loving attitude that has been his hallmark.

The underlying idea for the Prototype 9, the first Infiniti concept car to appear during his period in charge, is that—in the alternate universe supposed for the purpose—there were some really advanced Japanese aircraft designers who made a race car and mothballed it somewhere safe during the war years. Then, as a “barn find,” it could be refurbished and presented at Pebble Beach. How it managed to have acquired a grille shape that hadn’t existed in 1933 for a nameplate that came to market in 1989 with no grille at all is an open question. Albaisa says it made good sense to use the shape that has evolved from a quarter century of production. It certainly doesn’t look anachronistic or out of place on the Prototype 9. He also notes that there was a serious racing history at Prince Motor Company, acquired by Nissan long ago. We talked with Albaisa recently about how the concept came about, especially the most striking aspect of the design: a huge rise in the middle of the hood’s length. “It was inspired by the way the Howard Hughes’ H-1 world air-speed-record airplane looked when it was sitting on the ground, the rounded cowling standing up and everything falling away behind it,” he said.

That silvery record-holder was a huge achievement in the ’30s, exactly the period of the Infiniti 9. Albaisa said: “I wanted the shapes to look like lofted curves, between parabolic curves and some with more tension … between a tango and a Mexican wrestling match.”

Automobile Magazine: Where was the concept car made?

Alfonso Albaisa: It was actually made at our Oppama factory, the oldest one in the company. Once we got started on the project, the engineers got into it and wanted to make the “fake brake” you liked. Then the factory workers wanted in on the project. They learned to work the sheet steel by hand.

AM: The car is made of steel, not aluminum?

AA: Yes, we borrowed a bit of the steel used to stamp production parts right there in the factory. But we promised to give it back.

AM: So all of this was done by people who ordinarily don’t make prototypes?

AA: Yes, the whole thing was like a drink of water for the team. For the designers, it was a way to take us out of decoration. … The whole project, carried out in very little time, was a labor of love, done with a tongue-in-cheek attitude.”

AM: But with absolute seriousness, we’d say.








The post Cathing Up With: Alfonso Albaisa, Head of Nissan/Infiniti design appeared first on Automobile Magazine.

Source: http://ift.tt/LhoIaq

Diamonds in the Ruf

You’ve seen the tape, right? Stefan Roser, a 1987 Yellow Bird and a VHS cassette at the Nürburgring. The footage from that record-breaking drive is perhaps the first viral video ever created. As a result, most motoring enthusiasts know about the CTR ‘Yellow Bird’ and RUF Automobile, the ingenious company that created it. Like the Yellow Bird nickname, that Nürburgring video lap sensation wasn’t planned: it just happened, catapulting the hitherto relatively unknown manufacturer firmly into the consciousness of car fans the world over.

Technology would again play into RUF’s hands, its manufacturer status seeing it being included in Sony’s smash hit PlayStation game Gran Turismo 2 when Porsche itself wasn’t. That gaming exposure further cemented the small, bespoke manufacturer’s status among petrolheads, but for all the Yellow Bird’s 211mph achievements, RUF still flies under the radar.

Deliberately so, RUF remains something of an enigma. We know it produces its own cars, having had manufacturer status since 1981, but, really, few know anything else. The Pfaffenhausen-based company opened 78 years ago in 1939 with Alois Ruf Sr, a talented engineer repairing, improving and building vehicles. However, it was his son, Alois Ruf Jr, who would indulge in his passion for sports cars – and specifically the 911 – within the family business.

RUF attracts a different audience – a discerning clientele, who appreciate the engineering, the subtleties that define RUF’s models. Sure, a yellow, 469hp, turbocharged narrow-bodied 911 that monstered a performance test for American magazine Road & Track’s 1984 and 1987 ‘The World’s Fastest Cars’ features doesn’t exactly describe that, but then you don’t humble contemporary Ferraris, Lamborghinis and, yes, Porsches, without next-level engineering capability and skill.

It is that which defines RUF, that exacting attention to detail, with the focus on integrity rather than simply beautifying. If form follows that function it’s a bonus. RUF is about hand-built, small-volume vehicles, built as Alois and his family like them, and by family, that also includes its loyal customers.

US-based Arling Wang is among them. A long-time Porsche enthusiast and owner of LA specialists Rstrada, he’s also had a close relationship with Ruf for over six years now. Even better, he personally owns four RUF creations, and has visited Pfaffenhausen on countless occasions – so he’s better qualified than most to comment on Alois Jr’s enigmatic concern. Wang begins describing it, “With RUF it’s much more about a personal relationship. Every car you buy, you get to know them more.”

Wang buys into that relationship as much as he does the cars themselves, adding: “Ultimately the RUF package speaks to a certain owner, somebody who likes to have different things. For me, it’s about being low key, yet more sophisticated. If you know, you know; with a RUF it’s very much for you, it’s not for other people.” He adds: “It’s such an interesting company, all they do in-house is essentially run a family business, they don’t really care about what people say about their product, they only care about the people who believe in them.”

For the full article on Ruf Automobile’s incredible 911-based creations, pick up a copy of Total 911 issue 160 in stores now or get it delivered to you via our online shop. Alternatively, download a digital copy to any device via Apple Newsstand or Google Play

Source: http://ift.tt/2aDm7KV

Diamonds in the Ruf

You’ve seen the tape, right? Stefan Roser, a 1987 Yellow Bird and a VHS cassette at the Nürburgring. The footage from that record-breaking drive is perhaps the first viral video ever created. As a result, most motoring enthusiasts know about the CTR ‘Yellow Bird’ and RUF Automobile, the ingenious company that created it. Like the Yellow Bird nickname, that Nürburgring video lap sensation wasn’t planned: it just happened, catapulting the hitherto relatively unknown manufacturer firmly into the consciousness of car fans the world over.

Technology would again play into RUF’s hands, its manufacturer status seeing it being included in Sony’s smash hit PlayStation game Gran Turismo 2 when Porsche itself wasn’t. That gaming exposure further cemented the small, bespoke manufacturer’s status among petrolheads, but for all the Yellow Bird’s 211mph achievements, RUF still flies under the radar.

Deliberately so, RUF remains something of an enigma. We know it produces its own cars, having had manufacturer status since 1981, but, really, few know anything else. The Pfaffenhausen-based company opened 78 years ago in 1939 with Alois Ruf Sr, a talented engineer repairing, improving and building vehicles. However, it was his son, Alois Ruf Jr, who would indulge in his passion for sports cars – and specifically the 911 – within the family business.

RUF attracts a different audience – a discerning clientele, who appreciate the engineering, the subtleties that define RUF’s models. Sure, a yellow, 469hp, turbocharged narrow-bodied 911 that monstered a performance test for American magazine Road & Track’s 1984 and 1987 ‘The World’s Fastest Cars’ features doesn’t exactly describe that, but then you don’t humble contemporary Ferraris, Lamborghinis and, yes, Porsches, without next-level engineering capability and skill.

It is that which defines RUF, that exacting attention to detail, with the focus on integrity rather than simply beautifying. If form follows that function it’s a bonus. RUF is about hand-built, small-volume vehicles, built as Alois and his family like them, and by family, that also includes its loyal customers.

US-based Arling Wang is among them. A long-time Porsche enthusiast and owner of LA specialists Rstrada, he’s also had a close relationship with Ruf for over six years now. Even better, he personally owns four RUF creations, and has visited Pfaffenhausen on countless occasions – so he’s better qualified than most to comment on Alois Jr’s enigmatic concern. Wang begins describing it, “With RUF it’s much more about a personal relationship. Every car you buy, you get to know them more.”

Wang buys into that relationship as much as he does the cars themselves, adding: “Ultimately the RUF package speaks to a certain owner, somebody who likes to have different things. For me, it’s about being low key, yet more sophisticated. If you know, you know; with a RUF it’s very much for you, it’s not for other people.” He adds: “It’s such an interesting company, all they do in-house is essentially run a family business, they don’t really care about what people say about their product, they only care about the people who believe in them.”

For the full article on Ruf Automobile’s incredible 911-based creations, pick up a copy of Total 911 issue 160 in stores now or get it delivered to you via our online shop. Alternatively, download a digital copy to any device via Apple Newsstand or Google Play

Source: http://ift.tt/2aDm7KV

Diamonds in the Ruf

You’ve seen the tape, right? Stefan Roser, a 1987 Yellow Bird and a VHS cassette at the Nürburgring. The footage from that record-breaking drive is perhaps the first viral video ever created. As a result, most motoring enthusiasts know about the CTR ‘Yellow Bird’ and RUF Automobile, the ingenious company that created it. Like the Yellow Bird nickname, that Nürburgring video lap sensation wasn’t planned: it just happened, catapulting the hitherto relatively unknown manufacturer firmly into the consciousness of car fans the world over.

Technology would again play into RUF’s hands, its manufacturer status seeing it being included in Sony’s smash hit PlayStation game Gran Turismo 2 when Porsche itself wasn’t. That gaming exposure further cemented the small, bespoke manufacturer’s status among petrolheads, but for all the Yellow Bird’s 211mph achievements, RUF still flies under the radar.

Deliberately so, RUF remains something of an enigma. We know it produces its own cars, having had manufacturer status since 1981, but, really, few know anything else. The Pfaffenhausen-based company opened 78 years ago in 1939 with Alois Ruf Sr, a talented engineer repairing, improving and building vehicles. However, it was his son, Alois Ruf Jr, who would indulge in his passion for sports cars – and specifically the 911 – within the family business.

RUF attracts a different audience – a discerning clientele, who appreciate the engineering, the subtleties that define RUF’s models. Sure, a yellow, 469hp, turbocharged narrow-bodied 911 that monstered a performance test for American magazine Road & Track’s 1984 and 1987 ‘The World’s Fastest Cars’ features doesn’t exactly describe that, but then you don’t humble contemporary Ferraris, Lamborghinis and, yes, Porsches, without next-level engineering capability and skill.

It is that which defines RUF, that exacting attention to detail, with the focus on integrity rather than simply beautifying. If form follows that function it’s a bonus. RUF is about hand-built, small-volume vehicles, built as Alois and his family like them, and by family, that also includes its loyal customers.

US-based Arling Wang is among them. A long-time Porsche enthusiast and owner of LA specialists Rstrada, he’s also had a close relationship with Ruf for over six years now. Even better, he personally owns four RUF creations, and has visited Pfaffenhausen on countless occasions – so he’s better qualified than most to comment on Alois Jr’s enigmatic concern. Wang begins describing it, “With RUF it’s much more about a personal relationship. Every car you buy, you get to know them more.”

Wang buys into that relationship as much as he does the cars themselves, adding: “Ultimately the RUF package speaks to a certain owner, somebody who likes to have different things. For me, it’s about being low key, yet more sophisticated. If you know, you know; with a RUF it’s very much for you, it’s not for other people.” He adds: “It’s such an interesting company, all they do in-house is essentially run a family business, they don’t really care about what people say about their product, they only care about the people who believe in them.”

For the full article on Ruf Automobile’s incredible 911-based creations, pick up a copy of Total 911 issue 160 in stores now or get it delivered to you via our online shop. Alternatively, download a digital copy to any device via Apple Newsstand or Google Play

Source: http://ift.tt/2aDm7KV

Diamonds in the Ruf

You’ve seen the tape, right? Stefan Roser, a 1987 Yellow Bird and a VHS cassette at the Nürburgring. The footage from that record-breaking drive is perhaps the first viral video ever created. As a result, most motoring enthusiasts know about the CTR ‘Yellow Bird’ and RUF Automobile, the ingenious company that created it. Like the Yellow Bird nickname, that Nürburgring video lap sensation wasn’t planned: it just happened, catapulting the hitherto relatively unknown manufacturer firmly into the consciousness of car fans the world over.

Technology would again play into RUF’s hands, its manufacturer status seeing it being included in Sony’s smash hit PlayStation game Gran Turismo 2 when Porsche itself wasn’t. That gaming exposure further cemented the small, bespoke manufacturer’s status among petrolheads, but for all the Yellow Bird’s 211mph achievements, RUF still flies under the radar.

Deliberately so, RUF remains something of an enigma. We know it produces its own cars, having had manufacturer status since 1981, but, really, few know anything else. The Pfaffenhausen-based company opened 78 years ago in 1939 with Alois Ruf Sr, a talented engineer repairing, improving and building vehicles. However, it was his son, Alois Ruf Jr, who would indulge in his passion for sports cars – and specifically the 911 – within the family business.

RUF attracts a different audience – a discerning clientele, who appreciate the engineering, the subtleties that define RUF’s models. Sure, a yellow, 469hp, turbocharged narrow-bodied 911 that monstered a performance test for American magazine Road & Track’s 1984 and 1987 ‘The World’s Fastest Cars’ features doesn’t exactly describe that, but then you don’t humble contemporary Ferraris, Lamborghinis and, yes, Porsches, without next-level engineering capability and skill.

It is that which defines RUF, that exacting attention to detail, with the focus on integrity rather than simply beautifying. If form follows that function it’s a bonus. RUF is about hand-built, small-volume vehicles, built as Alois and his family like them, and by family, that also includes its loyal customers.

US-based Arling Wang is among them. A long-time Porsche enthusiast and owner of LA specialists Rstrada, he’s also had a close relationship with Ruf for over six years now. Even better, he personally owns four RUF creations, and has visited Pfaffenhausen on countless occasions – so he’s better qualified than most to comment on Alois Jr’s enigmatic concern. Wang begins describing it, “With RUF it’s much more about a personal relationship. Every car you buy, you get to know them more.”

Wang buys into that relationship as much as he does the cars themselves, adding: “Ultimately the RUF package speaks to a certain owner, somebody who likes to have different things. For me, it’s about being low key, yet more sophisticated. If you know, you know; with a RUF it’s very much for you, it’s not for other people.” He adds: “It’s such an interesting company, all they do in-house is essentially run a family business, they don’t really care about what people say about their product, they only care about the people who believe in them.”

For the full article on Ruf Automobile’s incredible 911-based creations, pick up a copy of Total 911 issue 160 in stores now or get it delivered to you via our online shop. Alternatively, download a digital copy to any device via Apple Newsstand or Google Play

Source: http://ift.tt/2aDm7KV

Diamonds in the Ruf

You’ve seen the tape, right? Stefan Roser, a 1987 Yellow Bird and a VHS cassette at the Nürburgring. The footage from that record-breaking drive is perhaps the first viral video ever created. As a result, most motoring enthusiasts know about the CTR ‘Yellow Bird’ and RUF Automobile, the ingenious company that created it. Like the Yellow Bird nickname, that Nürburgring video lap sensation wasn’t planned: it just happened, catapulting the hitherto relatively unknown manufacturer firmly into the consciousness of car fans the world over.

Technology would again play into RUF’s hands, its manufacturer status seeing it being included in Sony’s smash hit PlayStation game Gran Turismo 2 when Porsche itself wasn’t. That gaming exposure further cemented the small, bespoke manufacturer’s status among petrolheads, but for all the Yellow Bird’s 211mph achievements, RUF still flies under the radar.

Deliberately so, RUF remains something of an enigma. We know it produces its own cars, having had manufacturer status since 1981, but, really, few know anything else. The Pfaffenhausen-based company opened 78 years ago in 1939 with Alois Ruf Sr, a talented engineer repairing, improving and building vehicles. However, it was his son, Alois Ruf Jr, who would indulge in his passion for sports cars – and specifically the 911 – within the family business.

RUF attracts a different audience – a discerning clientele, who appreciate the engineering, the subtleties that define RUF’s models. Sure, a yellow, 469hp, turbocharged narrow-bodied 911 that monstered a performance test for American magazine Road & Track’s 1984 and 1987 ‘The World’s Fastest Cars’ features doesn’t exactly describe that, but then you don’t humble contemporary Ferraris, Lamborghinis and, yes, Porsches, without next-level engineering capability and skill.

It is that which defines RUF, that exacting attention to detail, with the focus on integrity rather than simply beautifying. If form follows that function it’s a bonus. RUF is about hand-built, small-volume vehicles, built as Alois and his family like them, and by family, that also includes its loyal customers.

US-based Arling Wang is among them. A long-time Porsche enthusiast and owner of LA specialists Rstrada, he’s also had a close relationship with Ruf for over six years now. Even better, he personally owns four RUF creations, and has visited Pfaffenhausen on countless occasions – so he’s better qualified than most to comment on Alois Jr’s enigmatic concern. Wang begins describing it, “With RUF it’s much more about a personal relationship. Every car you buy, you get to know them more.”

Wang buys into that relationship as much as he does the cars themselves, adding: “Ultimately the RUF package speaks to a certain owner, somebody who likes to have different things. For me, it’s about being low key, yet more sophisticated. If you know, you know; with a RUF it’s very much for you, it’s not for other people.” He adds: “It’s such an interesting company, all they do in-house is essentially run a family business, they don’t really care about what people say about their product, they only care about the people who believe in them.”

For the full article on Ruf Automobile’s incredible 911-based creations, pick up a copy of Total 911 issue 160 in stores now or get it delivered to you via our online shop. Alternatively, download a digital copy to any device via Apple Newsstand or Google Play

Source: http://ift.tt/2aDm7KV

2018 Jeep Wrangler Priced at $26,995

Jeep has announced pricing for the all-new, 2018 Wrangler JL. As expected, the costs have risen for each trim level. The base Sport two-door starts at $26,995 – a full $3,000 more than the equivalent outgoing Wrangler JK. The price hike continues throughout the lineup, with the two-door Wrangler JL Rubicon costing $3,350 more at $36,995. The four-door 2018 Wrangler JL Sahara starts at $37,345, which is $3,100 more than the JK version.

While the increase is steep, the hike can be explained by Jeep’s development costs, the Wrangler’s new aluminum components and strong steel frame, the new drivetrain options, the new hard and soft tops, and the vastly improved interior. Add to that Jeep’s need of relocating the Wrangler’s assembly to make room for the upcoming Wrangler-based pickup while continuing the Wrangler JK’s production into the first few months of 2018.

Continue reading for a full list of prices for the 2018 Jeep Wrangler JL.

Prices for the 2018 Jeep Wrangler JL

"The base Sport two-door starts at $26,995 – a full $3,000 more than the equivalent outgoing Wrangler JK."
2018 Jeep Wrangler Price
Wrangler Sport (two-door) $26,995
Wrangler Sport S (two-door) $30,195
Wrangler Rubicon (two-door) $36,995
Wrangler Unlimited Sport (four-door) $30,495
Wrangler Unlimited Sport S (four-door) $33,695
Wrangler Unlimited Sahara (four-door) $37,345
Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon (four-door) $40,495

These prices do not include the $1,195 destination and delivery fee Jeep charges for transporting the vehicles from the Toledo, Ohio factory to dealerships nationwide. Of course, taxes, license tags, and other fees are not included either. Adding options increases the price as well.

"Jeep expects the 2018 Wrangler JLs to begin arriving in showrooms sometime during the first quarter of 2018"

Jeep expects the 2018 Wrangler JLs to begin arriving in showrooms sometime during the first quarter of 2018. Four-door models will likely continue out-selling two-door models by a four-to-one ratio, just as with the outgoing Wrangler JK. And due to the big improvements, Jeep is hoping to improve the Wrangler’s global annual sales beyond the current figure of 250,000. Here in the U.S., Jeep sold nearly 203,000 Wrangler JKs in 2015, with another 20,880 going to Canada. The remainder is sold overseas.

References

Jeep Wrangler

Read our full review on the 2018 Jeep Wrangler.

Read our full review on the JK-gen 2017 Jeep Wrangler

Source: http://ift.tt/2te9DkD

2018 Jeep Wrangler Priced at $26,995

Jeep has announced pricing for the all-new, 2018 Wrangler JL. As expected, the costs have risen for each trim level. The base Sport two-door starts at $26,995 – a full $3,000 more than the equivalent outgoing Wrangler JK. The price hike continues throughout the lineup, with the two-door Wrangler JL Rubicon costing $3,350 more at $36,995. The four-door 2018 Wrangler JL Sahara starts at $37,345, which is $3,100 more than the JK version.

While the increase is steep, the hike can be explained by Jeep’s development costs, the Wrangler’s new aluminum components and strong steel frame, the new drivetrain options, the new hard and soft tops, and the vastly improved interior. Add to that Jeep’s need of relocating the Wrangler’s assembly to make room for the upcoming Wrangler-based pickup while continuing the Wrangler JK’s production into the first few months of 2018.

Continue reading for a full list of prices for the 2018 Jeep Wrangler JL.

Prices for the 2018 Jeep Wrangler JL

"The base Sport two-door starts at $26,995 – a full $3,000 more than the equivalent outgoing Wrangler JK."
2018 Jeep Wrangler Price
Wrangler Sport (two-door) $26,995
Wrangler Sport S (two-door) $30,195
Wrangler Rubicon (two-door) $36,995
Wrangler Unlimited Sport (four-door) $30,495
Wrangler Unlimited Sport S (four-door) $33,695
Wrangler Unlimited Sahara (four-door) $37,345
Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon (four-door) $40,495

These prices do not include the $1,195 destination and delivery fee Jeep charges for transporting the vehicles from the Toledo, Ohio factory to dealerships nationwide. Of course, taxes, license tags, and other fees are not included either. Adding options increases the price as well.

"Jeep expects the 2018 Wrangler JLs to begin arriving in showrooms sometime during the first quarter of 2018"

Jeep expects the 2018 Wrangler JLs to begin arriving in showrooms sometime during the first quarter of 2018. Four-door models will likely continue out-selling two-door models by a four-to-one ratio, just as with the outgoing Wrangler JK. And due to the big improvements, Jeep is hoping to improve the Wrangler’s global annual sales beyond the current figure of 250,000. Here in the U.S., Jeep sold nearly 203,000 Wrangler JKs in 2015, with another 20,880 going to Canada. The remainder is sold overseas.

References

Jeep Wrangler

Read our full review on the 2018 Jeep Wrangler.

Read our full review on the JK-gen 2017 Jeep Wrangler

Source: http://ift.tt/2te9DkD

2018 Jeep Wrangler Priced at $26,995

Jeep has announced pricing for the all-new, 2018 Wrangler JL. As expected, the costs have risen for each trim level. The base Sport two-door starts at $26,995 – a full $3,000 more than the equivalent outgoing Wrangler JK. The price hike continues throughout the lineup, with the two-door Wrangler JL Rubicon costing $3,350 more at $36,995. The four-door 2018 Wrangler JL Sahara starts at $37,345, which is $3,100 more than the JK version.

While the increase is steep, the hike can be explained by Jeep’s development costs, the Wrangler’s new aluminum components and strong steel frame, the new drivetrain options, the new hard and soft tops, and the vastly improved interior. Add to that Jeep’s need of relocating the Wrangler’s assembly to make room for the upcoming Wrangler-based pickup while continuing the Wrangler JK’s production into the first few months of 2018.

Continue reading for a full list of prices for the 2018 Jeep Wrangler JL.

Prices for the 2018 Jeep Wrangler JL

"The base Sport two-door starts at $26,995 – a full $3,000 more than the equivalent outgoing Wrangler JK."
2018 Jeep Wrangler Price
Wrangler Sport (two-door) $26,995
Wrangler Sport S (two-door) $30,195
Wrangler Rubicon (two-door) $36,995
Wrangler Unlimited Sport (four-door) $30,495
Wrangler Unlimited Sport S (four-door) $33,695
Wrangler Unlimited Sahara (four-door) $37,345
Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon (four-door) $40,495

These prices do not include the $1,195 destination and delivery fee Jeep charges for transporting the vehicles from the Toledo, Ohio factory to dealerships nationwide. Of course, taxes, license tags, and other fees are not included either. Adding options increases the price as well.

"Jeep expects the 2018 Wrangler JLs to begin arriving in showrooms sometime during the first quarter of 2018"

Jeep expects the 2018 Wrangler JLs to begin arriving in showrooms sometime during the first quarter of 2018. Four-door models will likely continue out-selling two-door models by a four-to-one ratio, just as with the outgoing Wrangler JK. And due to the big improvements, Jeep is hoping to improve the Wrangler’s global annual sales beyond the current figure of 250,000. Here in the U.S., Jeep sold nearly 203,000 Wrangler JKs in 2015, with another 20,880 going to Canada. The remainder is sold overseas.

References

Jeep Wrangler

Read our full review on the 2018 Jeep Wrangler.

Read our full review on the JK-gen 2017 Jeep Wrangler

Source: http://ift.tt/2te9DkD

2018 Jeep Wrangler Priced at $26,995

Jeep has announced pricing for the all-new, 2018 Wrangler JL. As expected, the costs have risen for each trim level. The base Sport two-door starts at $26,995 – a full $3,000 more than the equivalent outgoing Wrangler JK. The price hike continues throughout the lineup, with the two-door Wrangler JL Rubicon costing $3,350 more at $36,995. The four-door 2018 Wrangler JL Sahara starts at $37,345, which is $3,100 more than the JK version.

While the increase is steep, the hike can be explained by Jeep’s development costs, the Wrangler’s new aluminum components and strong steel frame, the new drivetrain options, the new hard and soft tops, and the vastly improved interior. Add to that Jeep’s need of relocating the Wrangler’s assembly to make room for the upcoming Wrangler-based pickup while continuing the Wrangler JK’s production into the first few months of 2018.

Continue reading for a full list of prices for the 2018 Jeep Wrangler JL.

Prices for the 2018 Jeep Wrangler JL

"The base Sport two-door starts at $26,995 – a full $3,000 more than the equivalent outgoing Wrangler JK."
2018 Jeep Wrangler Price
Wrangler Sport (two-door) $26,995
Wrangler Sport S (two-door) $30,195
Wrangler Rubicon (two-door) $36,995
Wrangler Unlimited Sport (four-door) $30,495
Wrangler Unlimited Sport S (four-door) $33,695
Wrangler Unlimited Sahara (four-door) $37,345
Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon (four-door) $40,495

These prices do not include the $1,195 destination and delivery fee Jeep charges for transporting the vehicles from the Toledo, Ohio factory to dealerships nationwide. Of course, taxes, license tags, and other fees are not included either. Adding options increases the price as well.

"Jeep expects the 2018 Wrangler JLs to begin arriving in showrooms sometime during the first quarter of 2018"

Jeep expects the 2018 Wrangler JLs to begin arriving in showrooms sometime during the first quarter of 2018. Four-door models will likely continue out-selling two-door models by a four-to-one ratio, just as with the outgoing Wrangler JK. And due to the big improvements, Jeep is hoping to improve the Wrangler’s global annual sales beyond the current figure of 250,000. Here in the U.S., Jeep sold nearly 203,000 Wrangler JKs in 2015, with another 20,880 going to Canada. The remainder is sold overseas.

References

Jeep Wrangler

Read our full review on the 2018 Jeep Wrangler.

Read our full review on the JK-gen 2017 Jeep Wrangler

Source: http://ift.tt/2te9DkD