Pro Racer’s Take: Ariel Atom 3S

Wind and fury, signifying plenty.

Forgive me, Shakespeare fans, for mangling his words, but those words seem appropriate for the Ariel Atom 3S.

This story begins with me noticing the drive chain on my Ducati Monster 1200R motorcycle needed a little lubrication. Time spent foraging in my garage eventually located nothing but an empty can, so I wobbled off to my local dealer, Two Wheels World in Pompano Beach, Florida.

As the dealership came into sight I noticed an Ariel Atom 3S sitting out front with several people standing around it. The dealership owner informed me his company is now also an Atom dealer, and then he asked if I’d like to take the demonstrator out for a spin. He didn’t have to twist my arm.

Also on hand was Jesse Kenealy, director of sales at TMI AutoTech Inc. in Virginia. TMI is the company Ariel licenses to manufacture Atoms in the U.S. TMI doesn’t just assemble them; it actually manufactures the cars at its factory about 20 minutes away from Virginia International Raceway. TMI has the rights to sell Ariel’s in North, Central, and South America. The parent company, Ariel U.K., takes care of everywhere else.

Let’s get the psychology out of the way. Nobody looks at this vehicle as a daily driver. Complaining that it doesn’t have cup holders, for instance, would be asinine. It’s not practical and if you think it’s a ridiculous waste of space, you’re obviously not in the market—and you’re probably missing the point altogether.

I like the Atom’s shape, especially from the front and sides. This particular 3S reminds me a little of a Pikes Peak Hill Climb Coyote race car, having the pronounced front wing and dinner-table size rear wing option. It certainly makes a statement.

Getting ready to drive the Ariel reminded me of the steps I take when preparing to ride my motorcycle. Most folks who drive Atoms in the U.K. do so without the windscreen in place and wear helmets for protection from the elements, suicidal birds, and discarded cigarette butts. In the U.S., windscreen and wiper come standard, so no need for my helmet. Part of the preparation means checking weather radar before setting off. The 3S is completely open and unless you’re never stationary, you will get soaked if it rains. I made use of the small storage space under the removable front hood for a rolled-up change of clothes, just in case. Storing a backpack on the passenger seat or down in the passenger foot well works, but other than that, whatever else you need should probably be in your pocket.

Getting into the 3S is no issue at all, as long as you can climb over stuff. Grab the roll cage, step onto the driver seat, and use the roll cage and seat bolster to lower yourself in. Even though the steering wheel is removable, it’s tiny and was never in my way during ingress or egress. This particular 3S has four-point harness seat belts for both seats. There is also a six-point option, which Ariel recommends for track work. Learning that 90 percent of owners never take these cars to the track surprised me, as I know I certainly would.

The 3S has two items necessary for starting the engine. One is a small proximity fob and the other is a red master key for turning the power on and off. Happily, I could reach the master key’s exterior location while sitting in the driver’s seat, a good thing since on several occasions I forgot to turn it on before climbing into the car.

Both seats are bolted to the floor, but TMI provides several location holes so some customization can be done for each owner. The demo car’s seat was a little far away from the pedals for me, so I used some padding to get properly sorted. You certainly need to be in the right position when driving this little rocket.

The steering wheel has no distracting, stupid, needless buttons on it. Not one. This alone might make the 3S worth the $89,975 entry fee. Optioned up with the carbon wing package ($5,975), premium paint, powder coated chassis, and logo-trimmed seats, this 3S listed at $101,515.

I found the brakes very easy to modulate and not grabby. The brake-bias adjustment is nice and progressive, though the 3S has no ABS. The adjustable traction control is not overly intrusive in the lower settings and can be turned off completely if you so desire.

Seeing the 3S’s front wheels turn while driving reminds me of being in something like a Formula Ford. Each parking lot feels like your own a racetrack paddock, adrenaline building by the second as you make your way out. A bit melodramatic? I can assure you, the friendly low-speed engine burble masks an underlying violent streak the UFC would be proud of.

Due to low gearing, launching the 3S is very easy. There is no need to dump the clutch to achieve a really hard launch. I found that spinning the engine to 2,500 rpms and a quick clutch release (not a dump) produced a rocket launch and virtually zero wheel spin or traction-control intervention. The nicely tuned suspension setup, rear engine weight, low gearing and Toyo R888R tires all combine for excellent launch capability.

The 3S weighs just 1,450 pounds. Its 2.4-liter i-VTEC Honda Civic engine springs to life the moment you press the starter button located on the dash near the steering wheel. Turbocharging takes engine output to a healthy 365 horsepower at 7,500 rpm and 310 lb-ft of torque at 4,400 rpm. The six-speed manual gearbox is superb and also comes from the Civic. It is a beautifully easy gearbox to use, whether shifting fast or slowly.

The steering wheel is small and needs a reasonable amount of effort to turn in parking lots. All necessary switches are behind or next to the steering wheel. Similar to riding a motorcycle, you’ll get used to where the controls are located, ultimately using them without looking. For instance, the turn signals operate by a little left/right toggle switch and do not self-cancel. I had no issue remembering to cancel them as operation is identical to a motorcycle’s; regular car drivers may need some time. But many new U.S. Ariel buyers are people who come from motorcycles because they see too many distracted car drivers out there and want a little more protection while having their fun.

I found road and wind noise to be reasonably acceptable with no hint of buffeting. Should you in fact want to talk to a passenger, you can certainly do so at low speeds and in a louder voice at freeway speeds. If you don’t like your passenger, just keep it above 80 mph.

On-center steering is stable, requiring very little driver input to stay centered on freeways or around town. Uneven pavement might require a little steering correction but no more than it does with most sports cars. The Toyo R888R tires are nice and sticky, but you don’t need to be in a four-wheel drift and totally on the limit to appreciate the performance of the 3S. The chassis immediately transfers what’s going on with the tires back to the driver, through the steering wheel and seat; it is very similar to a well setup race car. I found corner carving at 6/10ths almost as much fun as at 10/10ths, and a tad less traumatic for more sensitive passengers.

The 3S is incredibly quick off the line. The low gearing means you’ll blow through first and second gear in around two seconds. You almost have to shift out of first gear as soon as you fully release the clutch pedal, in order not hit the rev limiter. Zero to 60 mph is quoted at an admirable and socially unacceptable 2.8 seconds. Below 100 mph, the 3S will pull away from almost any other production car. But don’t only look at the raw numbers—remember, the 3S needs two manual shifts on its way to 60 mph, certainly losing time against a double-clutch automatic gearbox. Still, with driver weight added (let’s say the driver weighs 165 pounds), a Porsche 911 Turbo S has about 6.4 pounds per horsepower, while the 3S has only about 4.4 pounds per horsepower. Manual gearbox or not, the 3S really is explosive on acceleration.

I am an auditory junky when it comes to cars and motorcycles, and the 3S is one of the best overall sound machines I have ever driven. I can’t point to any one thing, it’s a mix. Let’s say you’re going along at 30 mph in third gear and decide to punch it: You immediately hear the exhaust note get seriously deeper and louder, along with an increasing rush of air noise starting to bellow from the massive air intake. In my cartoon mind, I imagine water from some broken dam hidden deep inside the intake is rushing toward my right ear. An increasing whine from the turbocharger finishes off this whole symphony perfectly. But wait, there’s more. As you lift off the gas to shift, that awesome twitter sound, loved by turbo fans everywhere, literally blasts from the turbo blow-off valve. I swear it sounds exactly like the old Porsche 935 and Audi Quattro turbo race cars.

After 5 minutes I was addicted. I would drive along in one gear for miles, accelerating and then lifting off the gas just to hear all the wonderful ear candy. The fact the 3S accelerates quicker than virtually anything on the street and handles like a slot car was actually lost on me for days. All I could talk about was the amazing soundtrack. Of course, I do find it hard to keep friends, as you can imagine.
















The Ariel Atom 3S is a rather special vehicle. It certainly isn’t cheap, but I suspect the folks seriously looking at purchasing one aren’t worried about cost. The 3S is rewarding to drive at any speed and let’s not forget the incredible ear candy. I received more attention while driving it and more questions while parked than with any other vehicle I’ve driven; nothing even comes close. You buy a 3S because you want to have a ridiculously fun experience, which it provides in shovel loads. Expensive? No argument. Worth it? Heck yes.

2017 Ariel Atom 3S Specifications

ON SALE Now
PRICE $89,975/$101,515 (base/as tested)
ENGINE 2.4L DOHC 16-valve turbo I-4/365 hp @ 7,500 rpm, 310 lb-ft @ 4,400 rpm
TRANSMISSION 6-speed automatic
LAYOUT  0-door, 2-passenger, mid-engine, RWD roadster
EPA MILEAGE N/A
L x W x H 134.2 x 74.4 x 47.0 in
WHEELBASE 92.3 in
WEIGHT 1,450 lb
0-60 MPH 2.8 sec
TOP SPEED 155 mph

The post Pro Racer’s Take: Ariel Atom 3S appeared first on Automobile Magazine.

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2018 Honda Accord 2.0T Gets a Civic Type R-Like Power Upgrade

The redesigned 2018 Honda Accord is quick, hitting 60 mph in 5.7 seconds with Honda’s new 10-speed automatic and a 2.0-liter turbo-four, a detuned version of the engine found in the new Civic Type R, that makes 252 hp and 273 lb-ft of torque.

Thanks to the Honda tuners at Hondata, more horsepower and torque can be extracted from the turbocharged engine in different stages.

Using Hondata’s FlashPro device, the company claims gains of between 10-40 hp and has posted a dyno sheet of the Stage 1 tune that shows increases of about 10 hp and roughly 40 lb-ft. When Hondata put a factory Accord 2.0T on a dyno (see the video below), they recorded a baseline of 266 hp and 292 lb-ft to the wheels, well above Honda’s advertised power ratings.

The estimated gains are based on those dyno numbers, so that puts the Stage 1 reflashed Accord at 276 hp and a healthy 332 lb-ft to the wheels using California’s 91 octane gas. That’s already more torque than the Civic Type R makes (306-hp and 295 lb-ft).

If Hondata was able to get 10 hp and 40 lb-ft from this tune, imagine the torque increase from the tune that gets you 40 hp.

Well, we don’t have to imagine as Hondata posted a video of the dyno run with the Stage 2 tune showing peak torque of 375.8 lb-ft–a gain of about 80 lb-ft over Hondata’s baseline figure.

Additionally, the Stage 2 reflash adds 50-55 hp in the middle of the power band, which is said to dramatically affect the driving experience.

The FlashPro only works on model-year 2018 or newer Accords with the turbo 2.0-liter engine and connects to the OBDII port without any ECU modification, but you will need a computer with a USB 2.0 connection.

The FlashPro device retails for $695, and appears to enable both Stage 1 and Stage 2 tunes. However, it’s unclear if any additional aftermarket parts are required for either reflash.

Honda is slowly phasing out its naturally aspirated engines in favor of turbocharged engines. While Honda purists may cry foul over this, many enthusiasts are taking advantage of the impressive power gains that come from tuning a turbocharged engine.

Check out the numbers Hondata got from the Accord’s 2.0-liter turbo-four in the video below, and also check out their baseline run to see how much power the new engine really makes.

Source: Hondata








The post 2018 Honda Accord 2.0T Gets a Civic Type R-Like Power Upgrade appeared first on Automobile Magazine.

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Tata Teases New Concept Ahead Of Debut At Geneva Motor Show 2018

Tata AMP Teaser

and the 45X at Geneva to give global audiences a glimpse of Tata’s upcoming SUV, hatchback and sedan. If the concept does turn out out be a sedan, it could form the basis for the car that competes with the Honda City, a segment Tata has been eyeing for years. The concept will be based on the Alfa, or the AMP platform, that also underpinned the 45X concept and is likely to be as long as the City, or possibly even longer.

Tata AMP

Tata has taken it upon itself to break conventions and the company will be looking at its new Impact 2.0 design language to turn this vision into a reality. In an, Pratap Bose, the design head at Tata Motors, pointed out that the platform will give Tata’s cars segment-leading wheelbases to lend them some serious road presence. And based on what we saw at the Expo, we don’t doubt these statements one bit. Expect the concept’s design to lay heavy emphasis on Tata’s critical design elements like the Humanity Line, Diamond DLO (Daylight Opening) and Slingshot Line to set the sedan apart from the rest of the field.

Tigor JTP

Don’t be surprised if Tata breaks away from the conventional sedan mould by going for a more coupandeacute;-like roofline or a sportback-style sedan like the, albeit with more radical lines. But all said and done, expect the sedan to retain Tata’s quintessential trait – cabin space.

The sedan is likely to be powered by Tata’s Revotron and Revotorq petrol and diesel engines mated to manual and automatic transmissions. It’s a little too early to draw any noteworthy conclusions, but one thing is for certain, Tata will be looking to form sub-segments of its own with each new product, and the upcoming concept, if a sedan, will give us a glimpse into how the Impact 2.0 story develops.

Source: http://zigwheels.com

Government Proposes New Green Car Policy

Government Proposes New Green Car Policy

Days after to make all-electric cars mandatory by 2030, the Indian Government has now proposed a ‘technologically agnostic’ plan to encourage manufacturers to promote greener cars in India.a While it may never be known what caused the latest knee jerk reaction from the Government, the message seems to be of softening of its stand on how India should move forward with adopting more eco-friendly modes of transport.

Government Proposes New Green Car Policy

Currently, cars are incentivised based on their dimensions, engine size and body style; the draft national policy by the Ministry of Heavy Industries recognises that this does not necessarily promote greener technologies. What the new policy proposes is to add average fleet emission norms for manufacturers, as is the norm followed in many mature markets globally, and leave it to the manufacturers to decide how they want to achieve these goals.

Government Proposes New Green Car Policy

With the new policy, manufacturers will have the freedom of choosing the fuels and technologies to achieve the fleet emission norms – reopening the doors for development of petrol/diesel, CNG, bio-ethanol, bio-diesel, hybrid and all-electric powertrains. Of course, the Government will encourage that these technologies be developed and made in India. Manufacturers meeting the goals or over-achieving them will have the liberty of selling carbon-credits and making more money, which should further boost their enthusiasm about the proposed policy.

Government Proposes New Green Car Policy

When implemented, cars with emissions lower than 155gm/km will receive more incentives from the Government, including lower duties and cesses. To make such cars more attractive to consumers, the Government is also proposing to make interest rates on loans and road taxes vary depending on a car’s emission rating. The emission cut-off will be reduced over time, with a target of 110gm/km for 2028.

Government Proposes New Green Car Policy

The new policy does give as each one can use their own expertise to tackle the issue, rather than invest everything on all-electric cars. The best news though, is that this policy looks more capable of tackling increasing vehicular pollution in India. The policy is still in its draft stage though and it remains to be seen what the final version will decree.

Source: http://zigwheels.com

Subaru Outback 50th Anniversary Edition

The Subaru Outback isn’t making many headlines today, especially when compared to other wagons on the market, but it’s getting pretty good reviews. Sure, it’s not as fancy as the Volvo V90 Cross Country or the Mercedes-Benz E-Class All-Terrain, but it offers a spacious cabin, solid off-road ability, and a decent equipment package. And it’s more affordable than the aforementioned models too. Introduced in 2014, the latest model is still pretty fresh, but Subaru is giving it the limited-edition treatment for 2018 with the 50th Anniversary Edition.

No, the Outback nameplate isn’t 50 years old yet. It’s barely on its way to its 25th anniversary. Of all the existing model, the Legacy is the oldest, and it dates back to 1989. This limited-edition model was actually launched to celebrate half a century since Subaru of America was established. The Outback is only one of seven vehicles to get this treatment, as the celebrations include all nameplates offered in the U.S. (sans the upcoming Ascent). What does it have to offer on top of the regular model? Let’s find out below.

Continue reading to learn more about the Subaru Outback 50th Anniversary Edition.

What makes the Subaru Outback 50th Anniversary Edition special?

  • Heritage Blue paint
  • Satin chrome trim
  • Chrome mirror caps
  • Unique wheel design
  • Black upholstery with silver stitching
  • Silver seatbelts
  • Special logos on seats and floor mats
  • Extra standard features
  • Standard drivetrains
"On the outside, the Outback sports a brand-new, light blue color that’s called Heritage Blue"

While it has a couple of features to set it apart from the regular Outback, this crossover shares most of its special features with the rest of the 50th Anniversary Edition lineup. So it’s far from unique. On the outside, the Outback sports a brand-new, light blue color that’s called Heritage Blue. The new hue is complemented by satin chrome trim for the windows, matching badges, and similar mirror caps. Subaru did add a set of exclusive wheels, but that’s it. All the other features remain unchanged.

Inside the cabin, there’s black upholstery highlighted by silver stitching, silver seatbelts, and "50th Anniversary" logos on embroidered on the front seat headrests and the carpeted floor mats. Standard features vary depending on trim, as this limited-edition model can be had in either 2.5i Limited or 3.6R Limited guise. For instance, both get standard power-adjustable front seats, heated front and rear seats, leather upholstery, and woodgrain-patterned, matte-finish accent trim.

"Pricing for each model is set at $35,080 and $37,280, respectively."

Engine options are standard. Go with the 2.5i Limited, and you get the 2.5-liter four-cylinder unit rated at 175 horsepower and 174 pound-feet of torque. If you need more oomph, the 3.6-liter six-cylinder cranks out 256 horses and 247 pound-feet of twist.

Pricing for each model is set at $35,080 and $37,280, respectively. That’s only a tad higher than the models they are based on. But unlike the regular model, production is limited to only 800 units for the 2.5i Limited and 250 examples for the 3.6R Limited.

References

Subaru Outback

Read our full review on the 2018 Subaru Outback.

Read more Chicago Auto Show news.

Read more Subaru news.

Source: http://ift.tt/2te9DkD

Subaru Outback 50th Anniversary Edition

The Subaru Outback isn’t making many headlines today, especially when compared to other wagons on the market, but it’s getting pretty good reviews. Sure, it’s not as fancy as the Volvo V90 Cross Country or the Mercedes-Benz E-Class All-Terrain, but it offers a spacious cabin, solid off-road ability, and a decent equipment package. And it’s more affordable than the aforementioned models too. Introduced in 2014, the latest model is still pretty fresh, but Subaru is giving it the limited-edition treatment for 2018 with the 50th Anniversary Edition.

No, the Outback nameplate isn’t 50 years old yet. It’s barely on its way to its 25th anniversary. Of all the existing model, the Legacy is the oldest, and it dates back to 1989. This limited-edition model was actually launched to celebrate half a century since Subaru of America was established. The Outback is only one of seven vehicles to get this treatment, as the celebrations include all nameplates offered in the U.S. (sans the upcoming Ascent). What does it have to offer on top of the regular model? Let’s find out below.

Continue reading to learn more about the Subaru Outback 50th Anniversary Edition.

What makes the Subaru Outback 50th Anniversary Edition special?

  • Heritage Blue paint
  • Satin chrome trim
  • Chrome mirror caps
  • Unique wheel design
  • Black upholstery with silver stitching
  • Silver seatbelts
  • Special logos on seats and floor mats
  • Extra standard features
  • Standard drivetrains
"On the outside, the Outback sports a brand-new, light blue color that’s called Heritage Blue"

While it has a couple of features to set it apart from the regular Outback, this crossover shares most of its special features with the rest of the 50th Anniversary Edition lineup. So it’s far from unique. On the outside, the Outback sports a brand-new, light blue color that’s called Heritage Blue. The new hue is complemented by satin chrome trim for the windows, matching badges, and similar mirror caps. Subaru did add a set of exclusive wheels, but that’s it. All the other features remain unchanged.

Inside the cabin, there’s black upholstery highlighted by silver stitching, silver seatbelts, and "50th Anniversary" logos on embroidered on the front seat headrests and the carpeted floor mats. Standard features vary depending on trim, as this limited-edition model can be had in either 2.5i Limited or 3.6R Limited guise. For instance, both get standard power-adjustable front seats, heated front and rear seats, leather upholstery, and woodgrain-patterned, matte-finish accent trim.

"Pricing for each model is set at $35,080 and $37,280, respectively."

Engine options are standard. Go with the 2.5i Limited, and you get the 2.5-liter four-cylinder unit rated at 175 horsepower and 174 pound-feet of torque. If you need more oomph, the 3.6-liter six-cylinder cranks out 256 horses and 247 pound-feet of twist.

Pricing for each model is set at $35,080 and $37,280, respectively. That’s only a tad higher than the models they are based on. But unlike the regular model, production is limited to only 800 units for the 2.5i Limited and 250 examples for the 3.6R Limited.

References

Subaru Outback

Read our full review on the 2018 Subaru Outback.

Read more Chicago Auto Show news.

Read more Subaru news.

Source: http://ift.tt/2te9DkD

Subaru Outback 50th Anniversary Edition

The Subaru Outback isn’t making many headlines today, especially when compared to other wagons on the market, but it’s getting pretty good reviews. Sure, it’s not as fancy as the Volvo V90 Cross Country or the Mercedes-Benz E-Class All-Terrain, but it offers a spacious cabin, solid off-road ability, and a decent equipment package. And it’s more affordable than the aforementioned models too. Introduced in 2014, the latest model is still pretty fresh, but Subaru is giving it the limited-edition treatment for 2018 with the 50th Anniversary Edition.

No, the Outback nameplate isn’t 50 years old yet. It’s barely on its way to its 25th anniversary. Of all the existing model, the Legacy is the oldest, and it dates back to 1989. This limited-edition model was actually launched to celebrate half a century since Subaru of America was established. The Outback is only one of seven vehicles to get this treatment, as the celebrations include all nameplates offered in the U.S. (sans the upcoming Ascent). What does it have to offer on top of the regular model? Let’s find out below.

Continue reading to learn more about the Subaru Outback 50th Anniversary Edition.

What makes the Subaru Outback 50th Anniversary Edition special?

  • Heritage Blue paint
  • Satin chrome trim
  • Chrome mirror caps
  • Unique wheel design
  • Black upholstery with silver stitching
  • Silver seatbelts
  • Special logos on seats and floor mats
  • Extra standard features
  • Standard drivetrains
"On the outside, the Outback sports a brand-new, light blue color that’s called Heritage Blue"

While it has a couple of features to set it apart from the regular Outback, this crossover shares most of its special features with the rest of the 50th Anniversary Edition lineup. So it’s far from unique. On the outside, the Outback sports a brand-new, light blue color that’s called Heritage Blue. The new hue is complemented by satin chrome trim for the windows, matching badges, and similar mirror caps. Subaru did add a set of exclusive wheels, but that’s it. All the other features remain unchanged.

Inside the cabin, there’s black upholstery highlighted by silver stitching, silver seatbelts, and "50th Anniversary" logos on embroidered on the front seat headrests and the carpeted floor mats. Standard features vary depending on trim, as this limited-edition model can be had in either 2.5i Limited or 3.6R Limited guise. For instance, both get standard power-adjustable front seats, heated front and rear seats, leather upholstery, and woodgrain-patterned, matte-finish accent trim.

"Pricing for each model is set at $35,080 and $37,280, respectively."

Engine options are standard. Go with the 2.5i Limited, and you get the 2.5-liter four-cylinder unit rated at 175 horsepower and 174 pound-feet of torque. If you need more oomph, the 3.6-liter six-cylinder cranks out 256 horses and 247 pound-feet of twist.

Pricing for each model is set at $35,080 and $37,280, respectively. That’s only a tad higher than the models they are based on. But unlike the regular model, production is limited to only 800 units for the 2.5i Limited and 250 examples for the 3.6R Limited.

References

Subaru Outback

Read our full review on the 2018 Subaru Outback.

Read more Chicago Auto Show news.

Read more Subaru news.

Source: http://ift.tt/2te9DkD

Subaru Outback 50th Anniversary Edition

The Subaru Outback isn’t making many headlines today, especially when compared to other wagons on the market, but it’s getting pretty good reviews. Sure, it’s not as fancy as the Volvo V90 Cross Country or the Mercedes-Benz E-Class All-Terrain, but it offers a spacious cabin, solid off-road ability, and a decent equipment package. And it’s more affordable than the aforementioned models too. Introduced in 2014, the latest model is still pretty fresh, but Subaru is giving it the limited-edition treatment for 2018 with the 50th Anniversary Edition.

No, the Outback nameplate isn’t 50 years old yet. It’s barely on its way to its 25th anniversary. Of all the existing model, the Legacy is the oldest, and it dates back to 1989. This limited-edition model was actually launched to celebrate half a century since Subaru of America was established. The Outback is only one of seven vehicles to get this treatment, as the celebrations include all nameplates offered in the U.S. (sans the upcoming Ascent). What does it have to offer on top of the regular model? Let’s find out below.

Continue reading to learn more about the Subaru Outback 50th Anniversary Edition.

What makes the Subaru Outback 50th Anniversary Edition special?

  • Heritage Blue paint
  • Satin chrome trim
  • Chrome mirror caps
  • Unique wheel design
  • Black upholstery with silver stitching
  • Silver seatbelts
  • Special logos on seats and floor mats
  • Extra standard features
  • Standard drivetrains
"On the outside, the Outback sports a brand-new, light blue color that’s called Heritage Blue"

While it has a couple of features to set it apart from the regular Outback, this crossover shares most of its special features with the rest of the 50th Anniversary Edition lineup. So it’s far from unique. On the outside, the Outback sports a brand-new, light blue color that’s called Heritage Blue. The new hue is complemented by satin chrome trim for the windows, matching badges, and similar mirror caps. Subaru did add a set of exclusive wheels, but that’s it. All the other features remain unchanged.

Inside the cabin, there’s black upholstery highlighted by silver stitching, silver seatbelts, and "50th Anniversary" logos on embroidered on the front seat headrests and the carpeted floor mats. Standard features vary depending on trim, as this limited-edition model can be had in either 2.5i Limited or 3.6R Limited guise. For instance, both get standard power-adjustable front seats, heated front and rear seats, leather upholstery, and woodgrain-patterned, matte-finish accent trim.

"Pricing for each model is set at $35,080 and $37,280, respectively."

Engine options are standard. Go with the 2.5i Limited, and you get the 2.5-liter four-cylinder unit rated at 175 horsepower and 174 pound-feet of torque. If you need more oomph, the 3.6-liter six-cylinder cranks out 256 horses and 247 pound-feet of twist.

Pricing for each model is set at $35,080 and $37,280, respectively. That’s only a tad higher than the models they are based on. But unlike the regular model, production is limited to only 800 units for the 2.5i Limited and 250 examples for the 3.6R Limited.

References

Subaru Outback

Read our full review on the 2018 Subaru Outback.

Read more Chicago Auto Show news.

Read more Subaru news.

Source: http://ift.tt/2te9DkD

Subaru Outback 50th Anniversary Edition

The Subaru Outback isn’t making many headlines today, especially when compared to other wagons on the market, but it’s getting pretty good reviews. Sure, it’s not as fancy as the Volvo V90 Cross Country or the Mercedes-Benz E-Class All-Terrain, but it offers a spacious cabin, solid off-road ability, and a decent equipment package. And it’s more affordable than the aforementioned models too. Introduced in 2014, the latest model is still pretty fresh, but Subaru is giving it the limited-edition treatment for 2018 with the 50th Anniversary Edition.

No, the Outback nameplate isn’t 50 years old yet. It’s barely on its way to its 25th anniversary. Of all the existing model, the Legacy is the oldest, and it dates back to 1989. This limited-edition model was actually launched to celebrate half a century since Subaru of America was established. The Outback is only one of seven vehicles to get this treatment, as the celebrations include all nameplates offered in the U.S. (sans the upcoming Ascent). What does it have to offer on top of the regular model? Let’s find out below.

Continue reading to learn more about the Subaru Outback 50th Anniversary Edition.

What makes the Subaru Outback 50th Anniversary Edition special?

  • Heritage Blue paint
  • Satin chrome trim
  • Chrome mirror caps
  • Unique wheel design
  • Black upholstery with silver stitching
  • Silver seatbelts
  • Special logos on seats and floor mats
  • Extra standard features
  • Standard drivetrains
"On the outside, the Outback sports a brand-new, light blue color that’s called Heritage Blue"

While it has a couple of features to set it apart from the regular Outback, this crossover shares most of its special features with the rest of the 50th Anniversary Edition lineup. So it’s far from unique. On the outside, the Outback sports a brand-new, light blue color that’s called Heritage Blue. The new hue is complemented by satin chrome trim for the windows, matching badges, and similar mirror caps. Subaru did add a set of exclusive wheels, but that’s it. All the other features remain unchanged.

Inside the cabin, there’s black upholstery highlighted by silver stitching, silver seatbelts, and "50th Anniversary" logos on embroidered on the front seat headrests and the carpeted floor mats. Standard features vary depending on trim, as this limited-edition model can be had in either 2.5i Limited or 3.6R Limited guise. For instance, both get standard power-adjustable front seats, heated front and rear seats, leather upholstery, and woodgrain-patterned, matte-finish accent trim.

"Pricing for each model is set at $35,080 and $37,280, respectively."

Engine options are standard. Go with the 2.5i Limited, and you get the 2.5-liter four-cylinder unit rated at 175 horsepower and 174 pound-feet of torque. If you need more oomph, the 3.6-liter six-cylinder cranks out 256 horses and 247 pound-feet of twist.

Pricing for each model is set at $35,080 and $37,280, respectively. That’s only a tad higher than the models they are based on. But unlike the regular model, production is limited to only 800 units for the 2.5i Limited and 250 examples for the 3.6R Limited.

References

Subaru Outback

Read our full review on the 2018 Subaru Outback.

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Kia Shows off the All-New Kia Ceed Prior to its Geneva Debut

Kia is set to pull the covers off of the Ceed hatch at the 2018 Geneva Motor Show. There are a lot of new details about the hatchback, but none is more important than Kia’s decision to spell the Ceed’s name the way it’s supposed to in the first place. Bye bye, apostrophe. We’re glad you’re gone.

"The good news is that a lot about the Ceed has changed for the better with the arrival of the new model"

I don’t recall a car whose name is as talked about as the Ceed. The decision to drop the pointless apostrophe opened the door for Kia to instead promote the car’s equally perplexing acronym. Apparently, “Ceed” stands for “Community of Europe, with European Design.” If that was the acronym all along, shouldn’t Kia have used a comma instead of an apostrophe?

Ok, mindless rant over.

Ultimately, the name is irrelevant compared to what the hatchback has to offer. The good news is that a lot about the Ceed has changed for the better with the arrival of the new model. The bodyshell and structure are largely new, though the suspension and a few of the engine options are carried over from the previous model.

Kia’s signature Tiger Nose grille remains as the centerpiece of the car’s front section. There are also hints of the Stinger scattered around the car’s design, particularly the arrangement of the lights and the aforementioned grille. Speaking of the lights, all versions of the new Ceed get those “ice cube” daytime running lights as standard. If you want to spice it up, LED headlamps are also available as options. Move to the rear, and you’ll see the Ceed sport more distinctive taillights than its predecessor.

"The floating digital clock on the dashboard has gone by the wayside in favor of a more traditional — and cleaner-looking — dash"

There are a number of things in the interior that’s also worth mentioning. Some of the controls remain the same, but the layout of the center console has changed. The most prominent of these changes is the position of the seven-inch display. Whereas it used to occupy the space below the A/C vents and was surrounded by toggles and buttons, the new display is now level with and flanked by the vents. The floating digital clock on the dashboard has gone by the wayside in favor of a more traditional — and cleaner-looking — dash. Prospective owners also get a range of options depending on the trim. Items like faux-leather, aluminum, glossy plastics, and real leather are all available as standard equipment on the right trim.

"There’s also a 1.4-liter naturally aspirated engine that can produce 99 horsepower and a range-topping 1.4-liter unit that has 138 horses at its disposal"

Power comes in the form of various engine options, including a 1.6-liter diesel that produces either 113 horsepower or 134 horsepower depending on the state of tune. A 1.0-liter gas unit is also available. That’s good for 118 ponies. There’s also a 1.4-liter naturally aspirated engine that can produce 99 horsepower and a range-topping 1.4-liter unit that has 138 horses at its disposal. All units come with a six-speed manual transmission, though there is an option to get a seven-speed double-clutch gearbox if you get either the 1.4-liter gas mill or its 1.6-liter diesel counterpart.

References

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