F1 backmarker Manor enters bankruptcy protection

Formula One team Manor Racing, formerly Marussia, on Friday entered bankruptcy protection, with FRP Advisory hired to oversee the process. The decision comes after several months of discussions with investors in an effort to secure funding for the 2017 season. However, with the team scoring just one point in 2016 it’s not hard to see why investors are holding back.

Team owner Stephen Fitzpatrick said talks had been underway regarding a sale to an Asian investment group but a deal couldn’t be ironed out in time for proper preparations for the new season, whose first race, the Australian Grand Prix, takes place in March.

Manor Racing was formed in 2010 but soon changed its name to that of main sponsor Virgin. The Virgin deal ended in 2012 when Russian sports car brand Marussia bought a controlling a stake and used its own name for the team. With the demise of the Marussia sports car brand in 2014, the Marussia F1 team soon fell into disarray. It was at this point Fitzpatrick bought the team, eventually reviving the Manor name a year later.

“Today’s decision to put the team into administration represents a disappointing end to a two-year journey for Manor,” Fitzpatrick said. “Unfortunately time ran out before [the investors] could complete the transaction.”

Manor, which is based in Banbury, England, currently employs 212 staff. Their future is dependent on whether the team can secure a new investor. The team’s drivers in 2016 were Pascal Wehrlein, Esteban Ocon and Rio Haryanto.

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Whill’s all-terrain wheelchair is built for rough surfaces

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Mazda Rotary Royalty At Daikoku PA

I always look forward to the very beginning of January when Daikoku PA welcomes in the New Year with an absurd number of exotics.

The parking lots are packed to the brim and the air filled with the unmistakeable sounds of Ferraris, Lamborghinis, Porsches, and McLarens; it’s truly a remarkable sight to see. I headed over the day after Dino’s visit to the famous Japanese parking area to see what was going on and hunt out some interesting cars to spotlight.

Among the sea of supercars I spotted something rather unique, and something that I’d never had the opportunity to see in person before.

Image 2

This 1968 Mazda Cosmo Sport Series II looked like it had recently driven off the showroom floor, and lucky me the owner was close by and more than happy to tell me everything about his baby.

When he found this Cosmo 30 years ago, it looked nothing like what you see today. Besides the natural wear and tear due to time, body and engine work was necessary.

Image 4

The overhaul goal was to keep everything as original as possible, thus the original 982cc 10A twin-rotor engine mated to a 5-speed manual transmission can be found under the hood.

Image 6

Being the first production vehicle from Mazda to use a Wankel engine makes the Cosmo Sport (known as the 110S in export markets) an important car, and the iconic rotary design motif can be found all over its exterior and interior.

Image 7

The car’s small cabin has been restored to original specification and is, quite frankly, a lovely place to be. I loved the assortment of knobs, switches, and the woodgrain steering wheel and shifter.

Image 8

The (purple?) Police-like signal light that the owner uses as hazards is the only thing that’s not original from factory.

Cover

With such a limited quantity of Series II Cosmos ever be built, this is a very rare car even in its home country of Japan, making it a perfect accompaniment to all the supercars at the Daikoku PA New Year meet.

Ron Celestine
Instagram: celestinephotography

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Faraday Future FF 91, Porsche 917 replica, Ram 1500 Rebel Black: This Week’s Top Photos

With the 2017 Consumer Electronics Show on this week, there was a lot of headlines regarding electric and self-driving cars. Thankfully, there was also some old-school grunt like the 2017 Ram 1500 Rebel Black announced. It’s a black-on-black pickup truck with 33-inch off-road tires, air suspension with specially-tuned Bilstein shocks, and the choice of V-6 and V-8 power.

We also learned of a British outfit by the name of Icon Engineering which is close to completing a highly accurate Porsche 917 replica. One of the reasons the car is so accurate is that it has been modeled off racer David Piper’s original 1969 917.

Subaru unveiled updated versions of its WRX and WRX STI, due for the 2018 model year. Unfortunately, you’ll have to be a die-hard fan to recognize the differences.

Electric car startup Faraday Future used CES to unveil its first product, the FF 91. The vehicle is a luxury SUV that can accelerate from 0-60 mph in a neck-snapping 2.39 seconds. It’s so quick it develops 1.1 g of force under full acceleration. If all goes to plan, Faraday says deliveries will start in 2018.

Bentley unveiled the fastest, most powerful model it’s ever produced. The car is the 2017 Continental Supersports, and it’s good for 209 mph thanks to a 700-horsepower output.

2020 Audi Q8 spy shots - Image via S. Baldauf/SB-Medien

2020 Audi Q8 spy shots – Image via S. Baldauf/SB-Medien

Enlarge Photo

Audi’s planned Q8 will be a range-topping SUV closely related to the Q7 but with a coupe-like profile. The vehicle will be previewed in concept form at next week’s 2017 Detroit auto show but this week we already saw one of the first prototypes.

Chrysler Portal concept, 2017 Consumer Electronics Show

Chrysler Portal concept, 2017 Consumer Electronics Show

Enlarge Photo

Chrysler revealed a self-driving electric car at CES. Called the Portal, it’s a concept that’s in the form of a minivan with six seats spread over three rows.

McLaren Monocage II carbon fiber monocoque structure

McLaren Monocage II carbon fiber monocoque structure

Enlarge Photo

McLaren this week showed off the new carbon fiber monocoque structure that will underpin members of the next-generation Super Series family. The first of these will debut in March at the 2017 Geneva auto show.

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Charters for winter cruising in the sun

Why wait until next summer to go sailing in the sun? Escape abroad for and charter and some warm weather cruising this winter

Charter
You’ll remember this photo of The Baths, BVI when you’re scraping ice off your windscreen tomorrow morning

Charters for winter cruising in the sun

There is a time every year when even the hardiest sailors begin to think of chartering in warmer climes. If the thought of braving the January weather at home is unappealing, then so is the idea of not sailing again until April or May! The answer often lies only a flight away, amid swaying palms and steady Trade Winds, floating on clear blue waters teeming with tropical fish. The charter holiday market has opened up globally over the last few decades so that destinations previously reserved for only the most adventurous of blue water cruisers are now accessible to those more used to weekend marina-hopping. We look at 10 mouth-watering charter destinations to consider. Resist their lure if you can…

Malta

Charter

Malta caters well for yachtsmen, with all facilities and perfect Med anchorages

If you’re happy to put up with a higher chance of rainfall than you’d find further afield, in exchange for a shorter flight, then Malta may well appeal. This English-speaking Mediterranean island is only 100 miles from Africa and the sea and air temperatures rarely drop far below 20°C. Charter firms operate all year round and the island caters well for yachtsmen.

Canary Islands

Charter

Anchor in isolated bays against the backdrop of dramatic lava fields

Nearly all Transatlantic and round-the-world cruising rallies start from the Canaries, and participants often bemoan the fact they didn’t leave more time to explore this fascinating group of islands. Each of the seven main islands has its own distinct character. Yachtsmen need to look out for the charted wind acceleration zones, where the normally steady NE Force 3-4 is funnelled into a sharp increase in velocity. The climate is rarely outside the twenties. With a flight from the UK just four hours and no time difference, it is an anomaly that the Canaries are not more popular with charterers.

Cape Verde Islands

Charter

Colonial architecture, African cuisine and exciting sailing make a charter in the Cape Verde Islands memorable

Much like the Canaries, each of these 25 islands is infused with a strikingly different influence, be it colonial, meteorological, geographical or touristic. What remains constant is the warm weather and sea temperature. The sailing can be challenging at times, with enough fetch between most of the islands for an Atlantic swell to build up in the steady, northeasterly trade winds. There are shorter inter-island hops for those after more relaxing sailing and plenty of sheltered anchorages. Get used to the island custom of hiring a ‘boat boy’ to look after the yacht while you’re ashore.

British Virgin Islands

Charter

Sandy Cay is just one of the highlights of the BVIs. It’s a sensational place to go sailing

Outside the Hurricane season, September to November, you’ll find 24-28°C, reliable F3-5 trade winds, warm, clear water, spectacular beaches, great sailing and simple navigation, with the next stop rarely more than an hour or two away. It’s a sailor’s paradise, which is why the BVIs are home to the biggest bareboat charter fleet in the world. If you’re keen on partying, aim for high season, December to April, but you may struggle for a mooring if you arrive somewhere after lunch. May to June is quieter but you’ll still find excellent sailing conditions so this is probably the best time to take your little pirates to the Caribbean. From August onwards, the winds ease and you really begin to feel the heat of summer.

Belize

Charter

Belize is not far from the Caribbean but the cruising is far less crowded and the snorkelling is some of the best in the world

One of sailing’s lesser-known charter gems, this English-speaking country on the eastern side of Central America offers cruising as good as anywhere in the nearby Caribbean islands. Underwater visibility stretches hundreds of feet, making it a prime diving and snorkelling destination. The hundreds of coral beds make up the world’s second-longest barrier reef and create a largely flat-water cruising ground. Hire kayaks to explore limestone caves along the coast. As with the Caribbean, the Trade Winds are constant and the main season corresponds neatly with the UK winter. Flying from the UK, change at Miami for a 12- or 13-hour journey.

Sea of Cortez, Mexico

Charter

The Wild West surrounds you in the extraordinary Sea of Cortez, where most of the coast is uninhabited

Also known as the Gulf of California, the sea lies on the west coast of Mexico but enjoys shelter from the Pacific, courtesy of the 900-mile Baja California peninsula. Sailors will enjoy hassle-free navigation and if visiting over the UK winter, should find settled conditions. This unspoilt wilderness is teeming with exotic sealife and cruisers will often spot whales, sea lions and manta rays. The area boasts incredible vistas from the mountainous to the wild western and myriad anchorages along hundreds of miles of solitary cruising. Most of the coast is uninhabited, so charterers should provision well at the main departure points of La Paz or Puerto Escondido. Away from these, the desert surrounds you.

Seychelles

Charter

Chartering in the Seychelles, it’s easy to see why the islands have some of the most photographed beaches in the world

With the distances between these Indian Ocean islands never much more than 30 miles, the archipelago’s steady winds of around 20 knots, plus its time difference to the UK of just four hours, it is no wonder that ever more charterers are heading here instead of the Caribbean. The flight, from most European airports, takes around 10 hours. The Seychelles are nowhere near as crowded as the Caribbean and there are two seasons, from May to October and from November to April. Navigation is not entirely simple – there are many unmarked rocks. You’ll also be keeping an eye out for the stunning beaches and sealife.

Phuket, Thailand

Charter

Get away from the crowds in Phuket and explore the incredible Thai coast

Phuket is a major tourist trap for landsmen, but for yachtsmen it offers magical cruising and access to places the majority of holidaymakers never reach. The island is famed for its beaches and a charter catamaran means low-draught access to the best of them in style. It is the exotic landscapes that really make this a charter to remember. National park Ko Rok Nok is a highlight, as is the place where the film The Beach was shot, Maya Bay. The east coast is peppered with protected anchorages and the bold can venture up one of the mangrove rivers, where they will only find the calls of monkeys and birds to disturb their peace.

Langkawi, Malaysia

Charter

Dramatic coastal scenery and dreamy white sand beaches greet the charterer in the archipelago of Langkawi

There are 99 islands within this archipelago in the Andaman Sea, separated from mainland Malaysia by the Straits of Malacca, and only two of them are inhabited. Charter a shallow-draught catamaran that you can beach on the unending stretches of white sand, fringed with palm trees and lush forest behind. The deserted anchorages, bays and coves you’ll find are countless. November to April sees north-east winds with fine weather and flat seas, sheltered by the Thailand peninsula. Happily for those visiting during the UK winter, the rainy season runs from the end of May until October. Why not visit the Langkawi Sailing School and do an RYA practical course in tropical waters? It’s a 12-hour flight from London.

Whitsunday Islands

Charter

Charterers can visit the Whitsundays year-round but must be prepared for self-sufficient cruising

It’s a 22-hour flight to Sydney and then a two-hour internal flight up to Hamilton Island, so you’ll want to make this a two or even three-week charter. The year-round tropical climate of these 74 islands, their breathtaking beauty and the straightforward eyeball navigation will make the jetlag well worthwhile. Good snorkelling sites abound and the best one in the world, the Great Barrier Reef, is only 35 miles away by yacht or seaplane. Most islands are uninhabited.

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Skip Novak sails 4,000 miles to refit his charter fleet in the South Atlantic winter

For Skip Novak, preparing for summer in the far south involves a supply run to Cape Town from the Falklands and a boat load of bureaucracy.

Pelagic Australis, the flagship of my two-boat fleet, which includes the original Pelagic (my ‘Pelagians’ call me the Commodore), was back on station in the Falkland Islands at the end of August after our annual refit in Cape Town. While the bigger of the two boats made this annual 4,000-mile voyage from Chile with charter crew on board, Pelagic sat decommissioned in Stanley for the southern winter. Although I have never been one to follow a routine, this is a routine nonetheless and one that we have been keeping since Pelagic Australis was launched in 2003.

Planning a charter season in the high latitudes is essential. Yacht services could be described as primitive in the Falklands, not due to lack of expertise on the ground – the Falkland Islanders are a resourceful bunch – but rather because of the continuing economic and logistic stranglehold Argentina keeps over this British outpost since they fought the war of possession in 1982. A bilateral agreement allows only one overflight of Argentine airspace per week from Chile. The alternative is a twice weekly service from Brise Norton in Oxfordshire with the RAF ‘air bridge,’ subject to availability from the UK Ministry of Defence. Hence, there are no spare parts for yachts kept in stock in Stanley.

This goes for Puerto Williams in Chile, a charming venue at the ‘ends of the earth,’ where it is impossible to buy a spark plug. Ushuaia is better supplied, but whatever services there are in that city of 70,000 people get undermined by arcane regulations and bureaucratic inconsistencies for customs and port clearances. There is not even a fuel jetty for small craft in Ushuaia – we roll 200-litre barrels down the dock, one by one and siphon the diesel into the tanks.

Consequently, refitting Pelagic is done by remote control to a great extent. This means an end of season audit, then loading Pelagic Australis with things like her liferaft for the annual inspection, outboards, inflatables, any motors and alternators for servicing and of course the sails for loft inspection and repairs. Without our ‘walk in’ forepeak on Pelagic Australis, which is a virtual cargo hold, this would be impossible with a full contingent of charter crew. On the return ‘dead heading’ journey the big boat is full to the brim with spares, supplies and provisions, plus, more often than not, spares and supplies for my colleagues on other boats in the area.

I am left on the dock in Cape Town: I do the rounds and pay the bills. The preseason checklist is also a substantial office job. Cruising permits with the South Georgia government must be finalised. Same for Antarctica with the Foreign Office, which processes our Antarctic Treaty permit applications. All our charter guests are subject to bio-security requirements to prevent the introduction of alien species to these fragile polar environments, so several reminders are sent out to make sure everyone is on side with their equipment and clothing.

The International Association of Antarctic Tour Operators also has preseason checks including logging our applications and permits with our flag states. Verifying things like our company information, vessel call data, shore side emergency contacts, crisis management plans and our schedules for the entire season are necessary for a smooth operating season for the organisation, and for us.

Like many things today, it has become more complicated with more and more due diligence required, at least if you play by the rules. Sometimes it is hard to stomach, especially having been south in the golden period, decades ago, when we asked no-one and just cast off and went.

However, having jumped through all these hoops, whether it be for your first time, or in my case 27 seasons later, there is always that reward on making landfall: snowy mountains and icebergs.

 

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2017 Dakar Rally – Stage 5 Results

Stage 5 of the 2017 Dakar Rally was billed as another brutal challenge for the competitors still remaining. The high-altitude terrain of Bolivia certainly lived up to that expectation, but today’s special was cut in half, with severe weather interrupting the day’s gauntlet.

As such, only 219km of the planned 447km special were ridden, but that “short” distance was enough to once again upheave the overall standings, with several riders losing time from navigational errors and penalties.

Sam Sunderland took the top honors for the day, breathing hope back into KTM’s 2017 Dakar Rally. Sunderland’s victory may have only been by seven minutes, but the gaps were with the right people, as he now stands 20 minutes ahead of Pablo Quintanilla – the previous overall leader.

Quintanilla finished the stage in seventh, losing some time on a navigational error out of a river bed. The Chilean’s conservative approach perhaps did him well though, as his fellow Husqvarna teammate Pela Renet lost over 45 minutes looking for the waypoint around the 152km mark.

With less to lose, the Honda riders pushed hard in Stage 5, though it can’t be said that the results benefited from their gamble. Only Franco Caimi (Honda South America Rally Team) and Paulo Gonçalves (Monster Energy Honda Team), put a Honda in the Top 15 of the day’s rankings.

Gonçalves sits 10th overall for his efforts, one hour and eight minutes behind Sunderland, which could create some interesting “what if” thoughts for the HRC squad, after yesterday’s one-hour time penalties for fueling in a prohibited zone.

Not much has been said this year about the Yamaha Racing effort, but Stage 5 saw a strong performance from Adrien van Beveren, who finished third for the day and seized the same position overall. At just 16 minutes back in the overall standings, Van Beveren is very much in the hunt for this year’s Dakar.

Yamaha’s Xaiver de Soultrait is also in the hunt, sitting 36 minutes back in sixth place. With two KTMs, two Yamahas, and a Husqvarna all with a reasonable hand on the winner’s trophy still, this is certainly shaping up to be an interesting Dakar Rally.

Tomorrow sees the circus traveling the capital city of La Paz. With 527km of special planned, we expect to see more shuffling of the leaderboard.

Top 15 from Stage 5 – Tupiza to Oruro

Pos. Rider Nation Team Bike Time
1 SUNDERLAND Sam GBR Red Bull KTM Rally Factory Team KTM 2:21’51
2 GONCALVES Paulo POR Monster Energy Honda Team Honda +7’07
3 VAN BEVEREN Adrien FRA Yamalube Yamaha Official Rally Team Yamaha +7’29
4 PEDRERO Joan SPA Sherco TVS Rally Factory Sherco +9’40
5 CAIMI Franco ARG Honda South America Rally Team Honda +12’13
6 FARRES Gerard SPA Himoinsa Team KTM +15’07
7 QUINTANILLA Pablo CHI Husqvarna Factory Rally Team Husqvarna +18’12
8 ESPAÑA Cristian AND Tallercall KTM +21’32
9 SALVATIERRA Juan Carlos BOL Duust Rally Team KTM +23’44
10 OLIVERAS Daniel SPA Himoinsa Team KTM +24’29
11 RODRIGUES Joaquim POR Hero Motorsports Team Rally Hero +26’45
12 PATRAO Mario POR JETMAR / KTM PORTUGAL KTM +27’33
13 METGE Adrien FRA Sherco TVS Rally Factory Sherco +28’44
14 MARTIN Diego ARG XRaids KTM +28’52
15 NOSIGLIA Daniel BOL MEC Team Nosiglia Honda +29’16

Provisional Top 15 Overall Standings for the 2017 Dakar Rally

Pos. Rider Nation Team Bike Time
1 SUNDERLAND Sam GBR Red Bull KTM Rally Factory Team KTM 15:22’05
2 QUINTANILLA Pablo CHI Husqvarna Factory Rally Team Husqvarna +12’00
3 VAN BEVEREN Adrien FRA Yamalube Yamaha Official Rally Team Yamaha +16’07
4 FARRES Gerard SPA Himoinsa Team KTM +20’57
5 WALKNER Matthias AUT Red Bull KTM Rally Factory Team KTM +29:01
6 DE SOULTRAIT Xavier FRA Viltais Racing Team HFP Yamaha +36’06
7 SVITKO Stefan SLO Slovnaft Team KTM +48’43
8 RENET Pierre-Alexandre FRA Husqvarna Factory Rally Team Husqvarna +54’45
9 MARTIN Diego ARG XRaids KTM +1:04’55
10 GONCALVES Paulo POR Monster Energy Honda Team Honda +1:08’21
11 RODRIGUES Joaquim POR Hero Motorsports Team Rally Hero +1:10’20
12 BARREDA Joan SPA Monster Energy Honda Team Honda +1:12’39
13 RODRIGUES Helder POR Yamalube Yamaha Official Rally Team Yamaha +1:23’38
14 CAIMI Franco ARG Honda South America Rally Team Honda +1:27’10
15 KLYMCIW Ondrej CZE Klymciw Racing Husqvarna +1:36’22
20 METGE Michael FRA Monster Energy Honda Team Honda +1:49’25
21 BRABEC Ricky USA Monster Energy Honda Team Honda +1:49’27

Honda:

Husqvarna:

KTM:

Source: Dakar; Photos: HRC Husqvarna, & KTM

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2017 Dakar Rally – Stage 5: Short, But Not So Sweet

Stage 5 of the 2017 Dakar Rally was billed as another brutal challenge for the competitors still remaining. The high-altitude terrain of Bolivia certainly lived up to that expectation, but today’s special was cut in half, with severe weather interrupting the day’s gauntlet.

As such, only 219km of the planned 447km special were ridden, but that “short” distance was enough to once again upheave the overall standings, with several riders losing time from navigational errors and penalties.

Sam Sunderland took the top honors for the day, breathing hope back into KTM’s 2017 Dakar Rally. Sunderland’s victory may have only been by seven minutes, but the gaps were with the right people, as he now stands 20 minutes ahead of Pablo Quintanilla – the previous overall leader.

Quintanilla finished the stage in seventh, losing some time on a navigational error out of a river bed. The Chilean’s conservative approach perhaps did him well though, as his fellow Husqvarna teammate Pela Renet lost over 45 minutes looking for the waypoint around the 152km mark.

With less to lose, the Honda riders pushed hard in Stage 5, though it can’t be said that the results benefited from their gamble. Only Franco Caimi (Honda South America Rally Team) and Paulo Gonçalves (Monster Energy Honda Team), put a Honda in the Top 15 of the day’s rankings.

Gonçalves sits 10th overall for his efforts, one hour and eight minutes behind Sunderland, which could create some interesting “what if” thoughts for the HRC squad, after yesterday’s one-hour time penalties for fueling in a prohibited zone.

Not much has been said this year about the Yamaha Racing effort, but Stage 5 saw a strong performance from Adrien van Beveren, who finished third for the day and seized the same position overall. At just 16 minutes back in the overall standings, Van Beveren is very much in the hunt for this year’s Dakar.

Yamaha’s Xaiver de Soultrait is also in the hunt, sitting 36 minutes back in sixth place. With two KTMs, two Yamahas, and a Husqvarna all with a reasonable hand on the winner’s trophy still, this is certainly shaping up to be an interesting Dakar Rally.

Tomorrow sees the circus traveling the capital city of La Paz. With 527km of special planned, we expect to see more shuffling of the leaderboard.

Top 15 from Stage 5 – Tupiza to Oruro

Pos. Rider Nation Team Bike Time
1 SUNDERLAND Sam GBR Red Bull KTM Rally Factory Team KTM 2:21’51
2 GONCALVES Paulo POR Monster Energy Honda Team Honda +7’07
3 VAN BEVEREN Adrien FRA Yamalube Yamaha Official Rally Team Yamaha +7’29
4 PEDRERO Joan SPA Sherco TVS Rally Factory Sherco +9’40
5 CAIMI Franco ARG Honda South America Rally Team Honda +12’13
6 FARRES Gerard SPA Himoinsa Team KTM +15’07
7 QUINTANILLA Pablo CHI Husqvarna Factory Rally Team Husqvarna +18’12
8 ESPAÑA Cristian AND Tallercall KTM +21’32
9 SALVATIERRA Juan Carlos BOL Duust Rally Team KTM +23’44
10 OLIVERAS Daniel SPA Himoinsa Team KTM +24’29
11 RODRIGUES Joaquim POR Hero Motorsports Team Rally Hero +26’45
12 PATRAO Mario POR JETMAR / KTM PORTUGAL KTM +27’33
13 METGE Adrien FRA Sherco TVS Rally Factory Sherco +28’44
14 MARTIN Diego ARG XRaids KTM +28’52
15 NOSIGLIA Daniel BOL MEC Team Nosiglia Honda +29’16

Provisional Top 15 Overall Standings for the 2017 Dakar Rally

Pos. Rider Nation Team Bike Time
1 SUNDERLAND Sam GBR Red Bull KTM Rally Factory Team KTM 15:22’05
2 QUINTANILLA Pablo CHI Husqvarna Factory Rally Team Husqvarna +12’00
3 VAN BEVEREN Adrien FRA Yamalube Yamaha Official Rally Team Yamaha +16’07
4 FARRES Gerard SPA Himoinsa Team KTM +20’57
5 WALKNER Matthias AUT Red Bull KTM Rally Factory Team KTM +29:01
6 DE SOULTRAIT Xavier FRA Viltais Racing Team HFP Yamaha +36’06
7 SVITKO Stefan SLO Slovnaft Team KTM +48’43
8 RENET Pierre-Alexandre FRA Husqvarna Factory Rally Team Husqvarna +54’45
9 MARTIN Diego ARG XRaids KTM +1:04’55
10 GONCALVES Paulo POR Monster Energy Honda Team Honda +1:08’21
11 RODRIGUES Joaquim POR Hero Motorsports Team Rally Hero +1:10’20
12 BARREDA Joan SPA Monster Energy Honda Team Honda +1:12’39
13 RODRIGUES Helder POR Yamalube Yamaha Official Rally Team Yamaha +1:23’38
14 CAIMI Franco ARG Honda South America Rally Team Honda +1:27’10
15 KLYMCIW Ondrej CZE Klymciw Racing Husqvarna +1:36’22
20 METGE Michael FRA Monster Energy Honda Team Honda +1:49’25
21 BRABEC Ricky USA Monster Energy Honda Team Honda +1:49’27

Honda:

Husqvarna:

KTM:

Source: Dakar; Photos: HRC Husqvarna, KTM, & Yamaha

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Amp up Your Mid-Ride Photo Game with the Dobby Pocket Drone

Rides take us to beautiful places we want to remember and share with friends. Unfortunately, all that beauty can be tough to capture through a smartphone lens. Enter the Zerotech Dobby pocket drone, a tiny flying camera that can provide a whole new perspective for your mid-ride snaps. 

While most drones are much too big to take on a ride, Zerotech’s Dobby is light and small enough—199g and about as big as an iPhone—to fit in a jersey pocket

Dobby Drone Battery Pack
The Dobby’s battery packs are swappable on the trail and cost $65 each. Matt Phillips

An iPhone or Android app controls the drone, and it will fly for about 10 minutes per charge. If you can’t get enough sweet shots, battery packs are swappable in the field. 

The Dobby shoots up to nine minutes of 1080p video, or about 200 13-megapixel photos. You can control the Dobby yourself or engage the follow-me mode; the Dobby will execute a 360 selfie or keep your mug centered in the frame using facial recognition. GPS and satellite signals keep the drone stable and the subject in fame. 

     RELATED: How to Take Better Photos of Your Bike

Zerotech representatives at the CES convention in Las Vegas told Bicycling that the Dobby can fly in up to 17mph winds, but has a maximum speed of 10mph, so it won’t keep up on fast descents. Reps also stated that the Dobby will resist a bit of sweat and water, but is not considered weatherproof. 

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