2017 Subaru Legacy Sport Long-Term Update 5: How it Compares to the Updated 2018 Model

In what qualifies as next-level product hype, Subaru gave us a Crimson Red 2018 Legacy 2.5i Sport to drive around for a few weeks last month. After 10 months and nearly 18,000 miles on our gray 2017 model, the bright newness of the 2018 definitely seems a little brighter and shinier.

For 2018, Subaru made some styling changes to the front and rear and added new LED daytime running lights to give the Legacy a “sportier” look. The changes are not radical enough to be considered a redesign, but the tweaks are a positive change.

Under the hood the suspension and electric power steering have been retuned in an attempt to give a smoother ride and enhanced feel when driving, again in an effort to be a little sportier.

The 2018 Subaru Legacy is pictured




Even after a few miles I noticed the ride got quieter in the 2018—an improvement on what was already a pretty smooth and quiet ride with our 2017 long-termer. Credit goes to the redesigned side mirrors and sound-insulating glass. Nice work.

Some tech features have been upgraded or added, including reverse automatic braking, steering-sensitive headlights, and the ability to monitor the pressures for individual tires. Nice incremental upgrades.

But the real star of this refresh rodeo is the overhauled multimedia display, which takes the center of the Legacy from dated to datable.

Although serviceable, the monochrome screen in the 2017 model has been reinvigorated by adding bolder, more colorful icons for the touchscreen’s functions. You notice it right away, and it really livens up the cabin. The small touch goes a long way to making the driving experience more attractive.

Along with the aesthetic makeover, radio and media functions have been tweaked to allow for more intuitive bookmarking and use of the functions you use often.

And to the cheers of many on staff, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto have been added, so you don’t need to untether your phone when driving. Welcome to the club.

Also upgraded are the graphics for the maps, which now look much more contemporary.

So a little something for everyone with this refresh. Styling, safety, and the indoor beautification project could be the difference between passing on the 2017 and jumping feet first into the 2018.

Frankly, we’re a little jealous. Well played, Subaru.








Read more about our 2017 Subaru Legacy Sport:








































The post 2017 Subaru Legacy Sport Long-Term Update 5: How it Compares to the Updated 2018 Model appeared first on Motor Trend.

Source: http://ift.tt/JPPTFe

2017 Subaru Legacy Sport Long-Term Update 5: How it Compares to the Updated 2018 Model

In what qualifies as next-level product hype, Subaru gave us a Crimson Red 2018 Legacy 2.5i Sport to drive around for a few weeks last month. After 10 months and nearly 18,000 miles on our gray 2017 model, the bright newness of the 2018 definitely seems a little brighter and shinier.

For 2018, Subaru made some styling changes to the front and rear and added new LED daytime running lights to give the Legacy a “sportier” look. The changes are not radical enough to be considered a redesign, but the tweaks are a positive change.

Under the hood the suspension and electric power steering have been retuned in an attempt to give a smoother ride and enhanced feel when driving, again in an effort to be a little sportier.

The 2018 Subaru Legacy is pictured




Even after a few miles I noticed the ride got quieter in the 2018—an improvement on what was already a pretty smooth and quiet ride with our 2017 long-termer. Credit goes to the redesigned side mirrors and sound-insulating glass. Nice work.

Some tech features have been upgraded or added, including reverse automatic braking, steering-sensitive headlights, and the ability to monitor the pressures for individual tires. Nice incremental upgrades.

But the real star of this refresh rodeo is the overhauled multimedia display, which takes the center of the Legacy from dated to datable.

Although serviceable, the monochrome screen in the 2017 model has been reinvigorated by adding bolder, more colorful icons for the touchscreen’s functions. You notice it right away, and it really livens up the cabin. The small touch goes a long way to making the driving experience more attractive.

Along with the aesthetic makeover, radio and media functions have been tweaked to allow for more intuitive bookmarking and use of the functions you use often.

And to the cheers of many on staff, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto have been added, so you don’t need to untether your phone when driving. Welcome to the club.

Also upgraded are the graphics for the maps, which now look much more contemporary.

So a little something for everyone with this refresh. Styling, safety, and the indoor beautification project could be the difference between passing on the 2017 and jumping feet first into the 2018.

Frankly, we’re a little jealous. Well played, Subaru.








Read more about our 2017 Subaru Legacy Sport:








































The post 2017 Subaru Legacy Sport Long-Term Update 5: How it Compares to the Updated 2018 Model appeared first on Motor Trend.

Source: http://ift.tt/JPPTFe

2017 Subaru Legacy Sport Long-Term Update 5: How it Compares to the Updated 2018 Model

In what qualifies as next-level product hype, Subaru gave us a Crimson Red 2018 Legacy 2.5i Sport to drive around for a few weeks last month. After 10 months and nearly 18,000 miles on our gray 2017 model, the bright newness of the 2018 definitely seems a little brighter and shinier.

For 2018, Subaru made some styling changes to the front and rear and added new LED daytime running lights to give the Legacy a “sportier” look. The changes are not radical enough to be considered a redesign, but the tweaks are a positive change.

Under the hood the suspension and electric power steering have been retuned in an attempt to give a smoother ride and enhanced feel when driving, again in an effort to be a little sportier.

The 2018 Subaru Legacy is pictured




Even after a few miles I noticed the ride got quieter in the 2018—an improvement on what was already a pretty smooth and quiet ride with our 2017 long-termer. Credit goes to the redesigned side mirrors and sound-insulating glass. Nice work.

Some tech features have been upgraded or added, including reverse automatic braking, steering-sensitive headlights, and the ability to monitor the pressures for individual tires. Nice incremental upgrades.

But the real star of this refresh rodeo is the overhauled multimedia display, which takes the center of the Legacy from dated to datable.

Although serviceable, the monochrome screen in the 2017 model has been reinvigorated by adding bolder, more colorful icons for the touchscreen’s functions. You notice it right away, and it really livens up the cabin. The small touch goes a long way to making the driving experience more attractive.

Along with the aesthetic makeover, radio and media functions have been tweaked to allow for more intuitive bookmarking and use of the functions you use often.

And to the cheers of many on staff, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto have been added, so you don’t need to untether your phone when driving. Welcome to the club.

Also upgraded are the graphics for the maps, which now look much more contemporary.

So a little something for everyone with this refresh. Styling, safety, and the indoor beautification project could be the difference between passing on the 2017 and jumping feet first into the 2018.

Frankly, we’re a little jealous. Well played, Subaru.








Read more about our 2017 Subaru Legacy Sport:








































The post 2017 Subaru Legacy Sport Long-Term Update 5: How it Compares to the Updated 2018 Model appeared first on Motor Trend.

Source: http://ift.tt/JPPTFe

2017 Subaru Legacy Sport Long-Term Update 5: How it Compares to the Updated 2018 Model

In what qualifies as next-level product hype, Subaru gave us a Crimson Red 2018 Legacy 2.5i Sport to drive around for a few weeks last month. After 10 months and nearly 18,000 miles on our gray 2017 model, the bright newness of the 2018 definitely seems a little brighter and shinier.

For 2018, Subaru made some styling changes to the front and rear and added new LED daytime running lights to give the Legacy a “sportier” look. The changes are not radical enough to be considered a redesign, but the tweaks are a positive change.

Under the hood the suspension and electric power steering have been retuned in an attempt to give a smoother ride and enhanced feel when driving, again in an effort to be a little sportier.

The 2018 Subaru Legacy is pictured




Even after a few miles I noticed the ride got quieter in the 2018—an improvement on what was already a pretty smooth and quiet ride with our 2017 long-termer. Credit goes to the redesigned side mirrors and sound-insulating glass. Nice work.

Some tech features have been upgraded or added, including reverse automatic braking, steering-sensitive headlights, and the ability to monitor the pressures for individual tires. Nice incremental upgrades.

But the real star of this refresh rodeo is the overhauled multimedia display, which takes the center of the Legacy from dated to datable.

Although serviceable, the monochrome screen in the 2017 model has been reinvigorated by adding bolder, more colorful icons for the touchscreen’s functions. You notice it right away, and it really livens up the cabin. The small touch goes a long way to making the driving experience more attractive.

Along with the aesthetic makeover, radio and media functions have been tweaked to allow for more intuitive bookmarking and use of the functions you use often.

And to the cheers of many on staff, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto have been added, so you don’t need to untether your phone when driving. Welcome to the club.

Also upgraded are the graphics for the maps, which now look much more contemporary.

So a little something for everyone with this refresh. Styling, safety, and the indoor beautification project could be the difference between passing on the 2017 and jumping feet first into the 2018.

Frankly, we’re a little jealous. Well played, Subaru.








Read more about our 2017 Subaru Legacy Sport:








































The post 2017 Subaru Legacy Sport Long-Term Update 5: How it Compares to the Updated 2018 Model appeared first on Motor Trend.

Source: http://ift.tt/JPPTFe

2017 Subaru Legacy Sport Long-Term Update 5: How it Compares to the Updated 2018 Model

In what qualifies as next-level product hype, Subaru gave us a Crimson Red 2018 Legacy 2.5i Sport to drive around for a few weeks last month. After 10 months and nearly 18,000 miles on our gray 2017 model, the bright newness of the 2018 definitely seems a little brighter and shinier.

For 2018, Subaru made some styling changes to the front and rear and added new LED daytime running lights to give the Legacy a “sportier” look. The changes are not radical enough to be considered a redesign, but the tweaks are a positive change.

Under the hood the suspension and electric power steering have been retuned in an attempt to give a smoother ride and enhanced feel when driving, again in an effort to be a little sportier.

The 2018 Subaru Legacy is pictured




Even after a few miles I noticed the ride got quieter in the 2018—an improvement on what was already a pretty smooth and quiet ride with our 2017 long-termer. Credit goes to the redesigned side mirrors and sound-insulating glass. Nice work.

Some tech features have been upgraded or added, including reverse automatic braking, steering-sensitive headlights, and the ability to monitor the pressures for individual tires. Nice incremental upgrades.

But the real star of this refresh rodeo is the overhauled multimedia display, which takes the center of the Legacy from dated to datable.

Although serviceable, the monochrome screen in the 2017 model has been reinvigorated by adding bolder, more colorful icons for the touchscreen’s functions. You notice it right away, and it really livens up the cabin. The small touch goes a long way to making the driving experience more attractive.

Along with the aesthetic makeover, radio and media functions have been tweaked to allow for more intuitive bookmarking and use of the functions you use often.

And to the cheers of many on staff, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto have been added, so you don’t need to untether your phone when driving. Welcome to the club.

Also upgraded are the graphics for the maps, which now look much more contemporary.

So a little something for everyone with this refresh. Styling, safety, and the indoor beautification project could be the difference between passing on the 2017 and jumping feet first into the 2018.

Frankly, we’re a little jealous. Well played, Subaru.








Read more about our 2017 Subaru Legacy Sport:








































The post 2017 Subaru Legacy Sport Long-Term Update 5: How it Compares to the Updated 2018 Model appeared first on Motor Trend.

Source: http://ift.tt/JPPTFe

2018 Porsche 911 GT3 First Test: Beauty Beheld

I stopped counting at 11, any significance to the number a happy coincidence. I always record my conversations with Randy Pobst, held in the doorway of whatever car he’s just lapped. It’s best to get him while everything’s fresh, before anyone says anything that might color his impressions. Today, his impressions were things of beauty.

“There’s very little to complain about,” he said. “It behaves so beautifully. The balance is so beautiful. You still have to be a little bit careful not going to power too soon. You still have to remember you’re in a 911 in situations like that.”

Beauty, being subjective, is of course in the eye of the beholder, and it was all Randy could get a hold of.

“It was a beautiful experience, like there was a light from heaven shining down on the car going around the track,” he said. “It was that kind of … otherworldly kind of perfection. Incredibly enjoyable. Not much to complain about.”

Perfection, too, is in the eye of the beholder and not an absolute. Perfect though he might find the 2018 Porsche 911 GT3, Randy did indeed find something to complain about.




“If you drive really aggressively on your turn-in, you can definitely over-rotate it and get it sideways,” he said. “It would be very easy for the average guy to go to power too early and create understeer. The driver has to be consciously aware of being in a 911, leaving that weight forward. Release the brake, but don’t go to power. Trailing throttle, high entry speed, off throttle or still braking. Put some weight up there, and it likes it.”

Treat it right, and that GT3 will treat you to a 1:24.66 lap around Willow Springs International Raceway’s “Big” track. At least, if you’re Randy Pobst. “It was so easy, I didn’t have to think through it a whole lot,” he said.

Of course, that’s if you’re driving one with the functionally telepathic PDK gearbox. With a stick shift, even Randy the Rocket loses a few tenths to the tune of a 1:24.96 lap. Either way, you’ve still crossed the line ahead of a 750-hp Aventador SV, 650-hp Corvette Z06, a 650-hp 650S, a 610-hp Huracán, a 600-hp GT-R NISMO, and a 577-hp AMG GT R. All with just 500 hp and 339 lb-ft of naturally aspirated torque.

It’ll shock a few of those cars on a straight track, too. Under the watchful eye of our VBox, the PDK-equipped car hit 60 mph in just 3.1 seconds with the six-speed manual just behind at 3.5 seconds. Keeping your foot in it, the seven-speed dual-clutch will post an 11.2-second quarter mile at 126.6 mph with the stick shift nipping at its bumper with an 11.5-second elapsed time at 125.2 mph. Let’s reiterate: that’s a naturally aspirated, 500-hp car with well under 350 lb-ft of torque running a standing quarter just shy of the venerated 10-second mark.

As mentioned earlier, these cars can turn, too. Put them on a skidpad, and the 23-pound lighter dual-clutch automatic car will pull 1.07 g while the nominally heavier manual strains the eyeballs with 1.11 g. A run around our figure-eight course demands a mere 22.7 seconds from the former and just 22.5 from the latter, each at 0.93 average g.

How is the slower-shifting manual car faster? It’s all in the gears. Taller ones, to be specific. With a 9,000-rpm redline, the manual car can ride out the short straights of the figure eight just kissing the limiter while the PDK goes for an upshift just before the brake zone, followed immediately by a downshift. Not having to shift always saves time, even in a box as good as the PDK. Speaking of braking, stopping these cars from 60 mph requires just 99 feet for that PDK and 98 for the slightly lighter manual.

Advantageous as it might be in the tight quarters of the figure eight, Randy found it an unfortunately liability in the ultimate quest for lap time.

“That is a lot more work,” he said, fresh off laps in the manual car. “Way more difficult to do a perfect lap with the manual transmission. I seem to end up halfway between gears a lot, and it was easier to destabilize the car in the brake zone. It’s tricky to do the brake and entry perfectly when there’s a downshift in there. It’s much more tricky to throw a downshift at it than not to. It’s reminiscent of what we have to deal with, with manual transmissions, having to decide what gear you need, and it takes more practice to do it perfectly in one lap. I didn’t get into the magic zone like I did with the PDK, maybe because of the extra work.”

Good work, though, if you can get it.

“The shifter is great,” he said. “It is very accurate; light. It has that slick, Teflon, mechanical feel. Never worried about getting the wrong gear. The only trouble was trying to be as perfect when I have to change gears.”




As we well know by now, if your lap time puts food on the table, you need a dual-clutch transmission. Freed of manual transmission planning and procedures, Randy could focus more on the rest of the car.

“Holy crap, the tire grip,” he nearly shouted after a few PDK laps. “Oh my God. I was so impressed with the tire grip, my God! I think I might’ve set my Turn 8 speed record. They are just so flippin’, sticky. It just felt so, good. I think it has some real live aero, because of the way it sticks and it’s stable at high speed, in Turn 8, especially.

The stream of consciousness was running deep and strong now.

“It’s a little free on entry, and it’s absolutely beautiful in the way it would come into the corner,” he continued. “It definitely has more front grip off-throttle than on. It just entered the corners really, really beautifully then it puts down power extremely well. There’s no wheelspin, anywhere. I never got yaw. It never got beyond a very pleasant, mild rotation. I mean, it was just beautiful. It was a beautiful thing, sublime.

“The braking is so strong. Not moving around at all. I was just braking really late, and the grip was just staying with me. The braking grip was just amazing.”




The professional racer is impressed, then, but what of the listener and chronicler, who hasn’t won the 24 Hours of Daytona? For myself, I find the GT3s an intoxicating challenge. That initial looseness on turn-in, that free feeling Randy describes, gives you butterflies at first. You know full well it’s a 911 and the engine would just soon enter the corner first, so you approach it gingerly. You quickly find, though, it’s just a little rotation like the man said. You can carry more speed. You don’t need to brake as much next time, or as early. The car has so much more to give, and you find a little bit more each time by.

It’s aggravating to realize how much time you’ve left on the table, and the need to find it is all consuming, and so the GT3 goads you on. With every lap, you push your brake point a little later, carry a little more speed into the corner, and get back on the power a little sooner, feeling out the point when a little rotation becomes a big rotation and a bigger repair bill. You want to spend all day improving your lap time by tenths of a second, consciously aware there could be full seconds on the table but also of the nearly $150,000 starting price. The GT3 wants you to be faster, but it’s going to make you work for it. It’s rewarding work.

The end.

What’s that? You’re one of those weirdos who doesn’t exclusively track your GT3? You drive it on the street? OK. Well, just ignore the words “lap” and “time” in the last two paragraphs and you’ll be fine.








2018 Porsche 911 GT3 6-speed manual 7-speed PDK
BASE PRICE $146,350 $145,650
PRICE AS TESTED $147,890 $160,900
VEHICLE LAYOUT Rear-engine, RWD, 2-pass, 2-door coupe Rear-engine, RWD, 2-pass, 2-door coupe
ENGINE 4.0L/500-hp/339-lb-ft DOHC 24-valve flat-6 4.0L/500-hp/339-lb-ft DOHC 24-valve flat-6
TRANSMISSION 6-speed manual 7-speed twin-clutch auto
CURB WEIGHT (F/R DIST) 3,270 lb (40/60%) 3,247 lb (39/61%)
WHEELBASE 96.7 in 96.7 in
LENGTH x WIDTH x HEIGHT 179.6 x 72.9 x 50.0 in 179.6 x 72.9 x 50.0 in
0-60 MPH 3.5 sec 3.1 sec
QUARTER MILE 11.5 sec @ 125.2 mph 11.2 sec @ 126.6 mph
BRAKING, 60-0 MPH 98 ft 99 ft
0-100-0 10.9 sec 11.4 sec
LATERAL ACCELERATION 1.11 g (avg) 1.07 g (avg)
MT FIGURE EIGHT 22.5 sec @ 0.93 g (avg) 22.7 sec @ 0.93 g (avg)
2.4-MI ROAD COURSE LAP 1:24.95 sec 1:24.66 sec
EPA CITY/HWY/COMB FUEL ECON 13/21/16 mpg 15/20/17 mpg
ENERGY CONS, CITY/HWY 259/160 kW-hrs/100 miles 225/169 kW-hrs/100 miles
CO2 EMISSIONS, COMB 1.24 lb/mile 1.15 lb/mile











































The post 2018 Porsche 911 GT3 First Test: Beauty Beheld appeared first on Motor Trend.

Source: http://ift.tt/JPPTFe

2018 Porsche 911 GT3 First Test: Beauty Beheld

I stopped counting at 11, any significance to the number a happy coincidence. I always record my conversations with Randy Pobst, held in the doorway of whatever car he’s just lapped. It’s best to get him while everything’s fresh, before anyone says anything that might color his impressions. Today, his impressions were things of beauty.

“There’s very little to complain about,” he said. “It behaves so beautifully. The balance is so beautiful. You still have to be a little bit careful not going to power too soon. You still have to remember you’re in a 911 in situations like that.”

Beauty, being subjective, is of course in the eye of the beholder, and it was all Randy could get a hold of.

“It was a beautiful experience, like there was a light from heaven shining down on the car going around the track,” he said. “It was that kind of … otherworldly kind of perfection. Incredibly enjoyable. Not much to complain about.”

Perfection, too, is in the eye of the beholder and not an absolute. Perfect though he might find the 2018 Porsche 911 GT3, Randy did indeed find something to complain about.




“If you drive really aggressively on your turn-in, you can definitely over-rotate it and get it sideways,” he said. “It would be very easy for the average guy to go to power too early and create understeer. The driver has to be consciously aware of being in a 911, leaving that weight forward. Release the brake, but don’t go to power. Trailing throttle, high entry speed, off throttle or still braking. Put some weight up there, and it likes it.”

Treat it right, and that GT3 will treat you to a 1:24.66 lap around Willow Springs International Raceway’s “Big” track. At least, if you’re Randy Pobst. “It was so easy, I didn’t have to think through it a whole lot,” he said.

Of course, that’s if you’re driving one with the functionally telepathic PDK gearbox. With a stick shift, even Randy the Rocket loses a few tenths to the tune of a 1:24.96 lap. Either way, you’ve still crossed the line ahead of a 750-hp Aventador SV, 650-hp Corvette Z06, a 650-hp 650S, a 610-hp Huracán, a 600-hp GT-R NISMO, and a 577-hp AMG GT R. All with just 500 hp and 339 lb-ft of naturally aspirated torque.

It’ll shock a few of those cars on a straight track, too. Under the watchful eye of our VBox, the PDK-equipped car hit 60 mph in just 3.1 seconds with the six-speed manual just behind at 3.5 seconds. Keeping your foot in it, the seven-speed dual-clutch will post an 11.2-second quarter mile at 126.6 mph with the stick shift nipping at its bumper with an 11.5-second elapsed time at 125.2 mph. Let’s reiterate: that’s a naturally aspirated, 500-hp car with well under 350 lb-ft of torque running a standing quarter just shy of the venerated 10-second mark.

As mentioned earlier, these cars can turn, too. Put them on a skidpad, and the 23-pound lighter dual-clutch automatic car will pull 1.07 g while the nominally heavier manual strains the eyeballs with 1.11 g. A run around our figure-eight course demands a mere 22.7 seconds from the former and just 22.5 from the latter, each at 0.93 average g.

How is the slower-shifting manual car faster? It’s all in the gears. Taller ones, to be specific. With a 9,000-rpm redline, the manual car can ride out the short straights of the figure eight just kissing the limiter while the PDK goes for an upshift just before the brake zone, followed immediately by a downshift. Not having to shift always saves time, even in a box as good as the PDK. Speaking of braking, stopping these cars from 60 mph requires just 99 feet for that PDK and 98 for the slightly lighter manual.

Advantageous as it might be in the tight quarters of the figure eight, Randy found it an unfortunately liability in the ultimate quest for lap time.

“That is a lot more work,” he said, fresh off laps in the manual car. “Way more difficult to do a perfect lap with the manual transmission. I seem to end up halfway between gears a lot, and it was easier to destabilize the car in the brake zone. It’s tricky to do the brake and entry perfectly when there’s a downshift in there. It’s much more tricky to throw a downshift at it than not to. It’s reminiscent of what we have to deal with, with manual transmissions, having to decide what gear you need, and it takes more practice to do it perfectly in one lap. I didn’t get into the magic zone like I did with the PDK, maybe because of the extra work.”

Good work, though, if you can get it.

“The shifter is great,” he said. “It is very accurate; light. It has that slick, Teflon, mechanical feel. Never worried about getting the wrong gear. The only trouble was trying to be as perfect when I have to change gears.”




As we well know by now, if your lap time puts food on the table, you need a dual-clutch transmission. Freed of manual transmission planning and procedures, Randy could focus more on the rest of the car.

“Holy crap, the tire grip,” he nearly shouted after a few PDK laps. “Oh my God. I was so impressed with the tire grip, my God! I think I might’ve set my Turn 8 speed record. They are just so flippin’, sticky. It just felt so, good. I think it has some real live aero, because of the way it sticks and it’s stable at high speed, in Turn 8, especially.

The stream of consciousness was running deep and strong now.

“It’s a little free on entry, and it’s absolutely beautiful in the way it would come into the corner,” he continued. “It definitely has more front grip off-throttle than on. It just entered the corners really, really beautifully then it puts down power extremely well. There’s no wheelspin, anywhere. I never got yaw. It never got beyond a very pleasant, mild rotation. I mean, it was just beautiful. It was a beautiful thing, sublime.

“The braking is so strong. Not moving around at all. I was just braking really late, and the grip was just staying with me. The braking grip was just amazing.”




The professional racer is impressed, then, but what of the listener and chronicler, who hasn’t won the 24 Hours of Daytona? For myself, I find the GT3s an intoxicating challenge. That initial looseness on turn-in, that free feeling Randy describes, gives you butterflies at first. You know full well it’s a 911 and the engine would just soon enter the corner first, so you approach it gingerly. You quickly find, though, it’s just a little rotation like the man said. You can carry more speed. You don’t need to brake as much next time, or as early. The car has so much more to give, and you find a little bit more each time by.

It’s aggravating to realize how much time you’ve left on the table, and the need to find it is all consuming, and so the GT3 goads you on. With every lap, you push your brake point a little later, carry a little more speed into the corner, and get back on the power a little sooner, feeling out the point when a little rotation becomes a big rotation and a bigger repair bill. You want to spend all day improving your lap time by tenths of a second, consciously aware there could be full seconds on the table but also of the nearly $150,000 starting price. The GT3 wants you to be faster, but it’s going to make you work for it. It’s rewarding work.

The end.

What’s that? You’re one of those weirdos who doesn’t exclusively track your GT3? You drive it on the street? OK. Well, just ignore the words “lap” and “time” in the last two paragraphs and you’ll be fine.








2018 Porsche 911 GT3 6-speed manual 7-speed PDK
BASE PRICE $146,350 $145,650
PRICE AS TESTED $147,890 $160,900
VEHICLE LAYOUT Rear-engine, RWD, 2-pass, 2-door coupe Rear-engine, RWD, 2-pass, 2-door coupe
ENGINE 4.0L/500-hp/339-lb-ft DOHC 24-valve flat-6 4.0L/500-hp/339-lb-ft DOHC 24-valve flat-6
TRANSMISSION 6-speed manual 7-speed twin-clutch auto
CURB WEIGHT (F/R DIST) 3,270 lb (40/60%) 3,247 lb (39/61%)
WHEELBASE 96.7 in 96.7 in
LENGTH x WIDTH x HEIGHT 179.6 x 72.9 x 50.0 in 179.6 x 72.9 x 50.0 in
0-60 MPH 3.5 sec 3.1 sec
QUARTER MILE 11.5 sec @ 125.2 mph 11.2 sec @ 126.6 mph
BRAKING, 60-0 MPH 98 ft 99 ft
0-100-0 10.9 sec 11.4 sec
LATERAL ACCELERATION 1.11 g (avg) 1.07 g (avg)
MT FIGURE EIGHT 22.5 sec @ 0.93 g (avg) 22.7 sec @ 0.93 g (avg)
2.4-MI ROAD COURSE LAP 1:24.95 sec 1:24.66 sec
EPA CITY/HWY/COMB FUEL ECON 13/21/16 mpg 15/20/17 mpg
ENERGY CONS, CITY/HWY 259/160 kW-hrs/100 miles 225/169 kW-hrs/100 miles
CO2 EMISSIONS, COMB 1.24 lb/mile 1.15 lb/mile











































The post 2018 Porsche 911 GT3 First Test: Beauty Beheld appeared first on Motor Trend.

Source: http://ift.tt/JPPTFe

2017 BMW M2 Long-Term Update 5: Is the M2 Too Hard, Too Hot, And Too Pricey?

We love our M2, love its size, its blistered fenders, and really love its snarling 365-hp 3.0-liter N55 twin-scroll turbo-six. What might be hard to love is its $57,795 as-tested price. Recently, we reviewed a $48,070 (as tested) 248-hp turbo-four 2017 BMW 230i and came away delighted and mightily impressed, but we still felt like Goldilocks in search of juuust right. In an effort to complete our BMW 2 Series sample platter, we got a hold of a 2017 BMW M240i ($52,875 as tested). As its name suggests, it might be stealthy M Division car in a plain 2 Series wrapper. It’s powered by the new B58 3.0-liter single-turbo straight-six, and we believe it might be a little underrated at 335 hp.

At the dragstrip, we expected the M2 to leave the M240i flatfooted at the line and never look back. Our M2 has a seven-speed twin-clutch automatic with launch control and 265-width rear tires to use it: 0–60 in 4.1 seconds. By contrast, the M240i came with the standard six-speed manual and 245-width tires. Although the M2’s N55 and the M240i’s B58 engines’ horsepower vary by 30 (advantage M2), their torque ratings are identical at 369 lb-ft (at 1,450 rpm in the M2 and at 1,520 rpm in the M240i). They left the line at virtually the same rate.

As the M2 began to pull ahead, it shifted 1–2 near 30 mph. The M240i’s taller gears mean it doesn’t need to shift until closer to 40, so it gained back a little and reached 60 in 4.3 seconds. And so it goes; with the M2 carrying a narrow lead until … what’s this? The M240i catches the M2 at about 70 mph, and they both cross the quarter-mile finish line in 12.9 seconds (M2 at 106.2 mph, M240i at 110.5 mph). How? Horsepower should rule, right?

After a 10-email volley with technical director Frank Markus, we put it down to aerodynamics. See, the M2 has greater frontal area (2.21 square meters) and higher drag coefficient (0.35) resulting in 0.75 “air resistance.” For the M240i, BMW shows 2.14 square meters frontal area x 0.33 Cd = 0.71 “air resistance.” Is that it, or is the M240i (shown below in red) the budget M car its badge declares? We say the latter.








More on our long-term BMW M2:

2017 BMW M2 2017 BMW M240i
BASE PRICE $53,495 $45,445
PRICE AS TESTED $57,795 $52,870
VEHICLE LAYOUT Front-engine, RWD, 4-pass, 2-door coupe Front-engine, RWD, 4-pass, 2-door coupe
ENGINE 3.0L/365-hp/369-lb-ft turbo DOHC 24-valve I-6 3.0L/335-hp/369-lb-ft turbo DOHC 24-valve I-6
TRANSMISSION 7-speed twin-clutch auto 6-speed manual
CURB WEIGHT (F/R DIST) 3,506 lb (52/48%) 3,487 lb (53/47%)
WHEELBASE 106.0 in 105.9 in
LENGTH x WIDTH x HEIGHT 176.2 x 73.0 x 55.5 in 175.9 x 69.8 x 55.4 in
0-60 MPH 4.1 sec 4.3 sec
QUARTER MILE 12.9 sec @ 106.2 mph 12.9 sec @ 110.5 mph
BRAKING, 60-0 MPH 101 ft 105 ft
LATERAL ACCELERATION 0.99 g (avg) 0.94 g (avg)
MT FIGURE EIGHT 24.0 sec @ 0.83 g (avg) 24.6 sec @ 0.77 g (avg)
REAL MPG, CITY/HWY/COMB 18.7/29.8/22.5 mpg Not tested
EPA CITY/HWY/COMB FUEL ECON 20/26/22 mpg 19/28/22 mpg
ENERGY CONS, CITY/HWY 169/130 kW-hrs/100 miles 177/120 kW-hrs/100 miles
CO2 EMISSIONS, COMB 0.87 lb/mile 0.87 lb/mile

































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2018 Infiniti QX60 AWD First Test: Spacious But Not Quick

The QX60 was Infiniti’s best-selling nameplate in the U.S. in January, though it’s not the most up-to-date. Despite a refresh for the 2016 model year, the interior design remains very similar to the original model that made its debut in 2013 when the SUV was still called the JX35. The infotainment system, CD player, and layout of the dash and center console betray its modern aspirations, making it feel dated compared with many rivals. But can the aging QX60 keep up with newer competitors such as the Volvo XC90, Buick Enclave, Acura MDX, and Lexus RX 350L on the road?

The interior might be old, but the QX60 has a new engine. For 2017, Infiniti dropped in a more powerful 3.5-liter V-6 with 295 hp and 270 lb-ft of torque. That engine is paired to a CVT, and on our tester, all-wheel drive. We clocked the QX60 hitting 60 mph from a standstill in 7.7 seconds.




Turns out the QX60 is slower than rivals. The quickest relevant competitor we’ve tested is the Acura MDX SH-AWD (6.2 seconds), followed by the Volvo XC90 T6 AWD Inscription (6.7 seconds). A little farther behind, the Buick Enclave Avenir AWD hit the mark in 7.0 seconds, and the new Lexus RX 350L managed a time of 7.5 seconds.

In the quarter mile, the QX60 recorded a time of 15.9 seconds at 90.3 mph. Once again, that’s behind the MDX at 14.7 seconds at 94.6 mph and the XC90 at 15.1 seconds at 90.4 mph. The Enclave ran the course in 15.4 seconds at 84.5 mph, and the RX 350L sealed the deal in 15.7 seconds at 91.1 mph.

Despite the results of our evaluations, the QX60 doesn’t feel underpowered. Drivers have plenty of juice to work with when getting up to speed on the highway, and the strong throttle tip-in only helps its case. Not to be mistaken for a gentle giant, the QX60 emits a rather aggressive, gritty engine noise that’s far from the sultry rumble of a sports car. Although not unusual for a three-row SUV, it requires a little more turning of the steering wheel to round a corner, and tight three-point turns are an exercise in fortitude. Generally, the QX60 drives quietly and handles reasonably on city and highway streets. Road imperfections cause some noticeable body roll, and you might feel some disturbance in the front end.




The brakes bite sharply, although as our test team noted, you’ll encounter a good amount of forward pitch. In our braking evaluation, the QX60 took 122 feet to stop from 60 mph, about on par with the MDX (121 feet) and better than the RX 350L (128). The XC90 took just 113 feet to come to a stop, however.

The EPA rates the QX60 at 19/26/22 mpg city/highway/combined. But our Real MPG tests showed the SUV underperforms this estimate. We achieved just 17.8/24.9/20.4 mpg. Although we haven’t Real MPG-tested the Volvo or Buick, the Infiniti came in below the Acura MDX and Lexus RX 350L, which earned 23.8 and 21.1 mpg in combined city and highway driving, respectively.

Of course, most buyers in this category will be willing to sacrifice fuel economy for interior space, which the Infiniti offers in spades, particularly in the second row. And it’s easy to get in the third row. The second-row seats move easily fore and aft by sliding the lever on the side of the seat. If there’s a child seat in the passenger side of the second row, you don’t have to remove it before climbing into the very back. This seat tilts, and the track is released so the seat can be neatly pushed forward all the way. But you have to make sure to lock all seats into position after moving them so they don’t slide around during the drive.








Speaking of safety, the 2018 Infiniti QX60 earned a five-star overall rating in government crash tests. This score broke down to a four-star rating in the frontal crash category, a five-star rating in the side crash category, and a four-star rollover rating. It also earned “Good” scores in every crash category tested by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, though it failed to earn a Top Safety Pick award because of its “Poor” HID headlights. It also hasn’t been rated in the new passenger-side small overlap front test, which measures what happens when the front right corner of the vehicle hits a tree or pole at 40 mph.

In the future, Infiniti will reposition itself as an electrified brand. But for now, SUVs are probably the strongest part of the brand’s identity. QX60 sales were up 38.4 percent last month, when sales of every other Infiniti vehicle, besides the QX80, dropped. Age might be working against it, but to a large degree, the QX60 is obviously satisfying customers’ insatiable appetite for SUVs.

2018 Infiniti QX60 3.5 (AWD)
BASE PRICE $46,095
PRICE AS TESTED $60,670
VEHICLE LAYOUT Front-engine, AWD, 7-pass, 4-door SUV
ENGINE 3.5L/295-hp/270-lb-ft DOHC 24-valve V-6
TRANSMISSION Cont variable auto
CURB WEIGHT (F/R DIST) 4,621 lb (56/44%)
WHEELBASE 114.2 in
LENGTH x WIDTH x HEIGHT 200.1 x 77.2 x 68.6 in
0-60 MPH 7.7 sec
QUARTER MILE 15.9 sec @ 90.3 mph
BRAKING, 60-0 MPH 122 ft
LATERAL ACCELERATION 0.78 g (avg)
MT FIGURE EIGHT 28.3 sec @ 0.60 g (avg)
REAL MPG, CITY/HWY/COMB 17.8/24.9/20.4 mpg
EPA CITY/HWY/COMB FUEL ECON 19/26/22 mpg
ENERGY CONS, CITY/HWY 177/130 kW-hrs/100 miles
CO2 EMISSIONS, COMB 0.90 lb/mile

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2018 Infiniti QX60 AWD First Test: Spacious But Not Quick

The QX60 was Infiniti’s best-selling nameplate in the U.S. in January, though it’s not the most up-to-date. Despite a refresh for the 2016 model year, the interior design remains very similar to the original model that made its debut in 2013 when the SUV was still called the JX35. The infotainment system, CD player, and layout of the dash and center console betray its modern aspirations, making it feel dated compared with many rivals. But can the aging QX60 keep up with newer competitors such as the Volvo XC90, Buick Enclave, Acura MDX, and Lexus RX 350L on the road?

The interior might be old, but the QX60 has a new engine. For 2017, Infiniti dropped in a more powerful 3.5-liter V-6 with 295 hp and 270 lb-ft of torque. That engine is paired to a CVT, and on our tester, all-wheel drive. We clocked the QX60 hitting 60 mph from a standstill in 7.7 seconds.




Turns out the QX60 is slower than rivals. The quickest relevant competitor we’ve tested is the Acura MDX SH-AWD (6.2 seconds), followed by the Volvo XC90 T6 AWD Inscription (6.7 seconds). A little farther behind, the Buick Enclave Avenir AWD hit the mark in 7.0 seconds, and the new Lexus RX 350L managed a time of 7.5 seconds.

In the quarter mile, the QX60 recorded a time of 15.9 seconds at 90.3 mph. Once again, that’s behind the MDX at 14.7 seconds at 94.6 mph and the XC90 at 15.1 seconds at 90.4 mph. The Enclave ran the course in 15.4 seconds at 84.5 mph, and the RX 350L sealed the deal in 15.7 seconds at 91.1 mph.

Despite the results of our evaluations, the QX60 doesn’t feel underpowered. Drivers have plenty of juice to work with when getting up to speed on the highway, and the strong throttle tip-in only helps its case. Not to be mistaken for a gentle giant, the QX60 emits a rather aggressive, gritty engine noise that’s far from the sultry rumble of a sports car. Although not unusual for a three-row SUV, it requires a little more turning of the steering wheel to round a corner, and tight three-point turns are an exercise in fortitude. Generally, the QX60 drives quietly and handles reasonably on city and highway streets. Road imperfections cause some noticeable body roll, and you might feel some disturbance in the front end.




The brakes bite sharply, although as our test team noted, you’ll encounter a good amount of forward pitch. In our braking evaluation, the QX60 took 122 feet to stop from 60 mph, about on par with the MDX (121 feet) and better than the RX 350L (128). The XC90 took just 113 feet to come to a stop, however.

The EPA rates the QX60 at 19/26/22 mpg city/highway/combined. But our Real MPG tests showed the SUV underperforms this estimate. We achieved just 17.8/24.9/20.4 mpg. Although we haven’t Real MPG-tested the Volvo or Buick, the Infiniti came in below the Acura MDX and Lexus RX 350L, which earned 23.8 and 21.1 mpg in combined city and highway driving, respectively.

Of course, most buyers in this category will be willing to sacrifice fuel economy for interior space, which the Infiniti offers in spades, particularly in the second row. And it’s easy to get in the third row. The second-row seats move easily fore and aft by sliding the lever on the side of the seat. If there’s a child seat in the passenger side of the second row, you don’t have to remove it before climbing into the very back. This seat tilts, and the track is released so the seat can be neatly pushed forward all the way. But you have to make sure to lock all seats into position after moving them so they don’t slide around during the drive.








Speaking of safety, the 2018 Infiniti QX60 earned a five-star overall rating in government crash tests. This score broke down to a four-star rating in the frontal crash category, a five-star rating in the side crash category, and a four-star rollover rating. It also earned “Good” scores in every crash category tested by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, though it failed to earn a Top Safety Pick award because of its “Poor” HID headlights. It also hasn’t been rated in the new passenger-side small overlap front test, which measures what happens when the front right corner of the vehicle hits a tree or pole at 40 mph.

In the future, Infiniti will reposition itself as an electrified brand. But for now, SUVs are probably the strongest part of the brand’s identity. QX60 sales were up 38.4 percent last month, when sales of every other Infiniti vehicle, besides the QX80, dropped. Age might be working against it, but to a large degree, the QX60 is obviously satisfying customers’ insatiable appetite for SUVs.

2018 Infiniti QX60 3.5 (AWD)
BASE PRICE $46,095
PRICE AS TESTED $60,670
VEHICLE LAYOUT Front-engine, AWD, 7-pass, 4-door SUV
ENGINE 3.5L/295-hp/270-lb-ft DOHC 24-valve V-6
TRANSMISSION Cont variable auto
CURB WEIGHT (F/R DIST) 4,621 lb (56/44%)
WHEELBASE 114.2 in
LENGTH x WIDTH x HEIGHT 200.1 x 77.2 x 68.6 in
0-60 MPH 7.7 sec
QUARTER MILE 15.9 sec @ 90.3 mph
BRAKING, 60-0 MPH 122 ft
LATERAL ACCELERATION 0.78 g (avg)
MT FIGURE EIGHT 28.3 sec @ 0.60 g (avg)
REAL MPG, CITY/HWY/COMB 17.8/24.9/20.4 mpg
EPA CITY/HWY/COMB FUEL ECON 19/26/22 mpg
ENERGY CONS, CITY/HWY 177/130 kW-hrs/100 miles
CO2 EMISSIONS, COMB 0.90 lb/mile

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