Aston Martin Thinks Hypercars Could Save Le Mans Racing

Currently, only Toyota is still committed to LMP1

No Obligation, Fast & Simple Free New Car Quote

With PorscheAudi, and Nissan now out of LMP1, the top level of endurance racing, Toyota is the only manufacturer left to compete at Le Mans. Since it’s not particularly exciting to watch one works team race itself, this has left the sport in an unstable position. But if Aston Martin gets its way, the FIA would try to save LMP1 by allowing road-based race cars.

Speaking to Autocar recently, Andy Palmer, CEO of Aston Martin, said officials from the FIA had approached him about potentially changing regulations to attract more automakers. His suggestion? Open LMP1 up to race cars based on production models.

“My personal perspective is very clear: Aston Martin will never compete in a prototype category because it has no relevance to us,” he said. “But if they allowed racing derivatives of road cars, that would be very interesting to us and, I suspect, the fans.”

The way Palmer sees it, having production-based cars compete in LMP1 would go beyond attracting more manufacturers. It would also keep with Le Mans tradition. “Road-derived race cars fighting for the win is in keeping with the history of sportscar and Le Mans racing,” said Palmer. “And the prospect of the likes of Valkyrie fighting against McLaren P1, LaFerrari and more would be interesting to more than just me, I suspect.”

When Autocar asked Palmer if Aston Martin would race the Valkyrie in LMP1 if the FIA adopted his rules suggestion, he responded, “Watch this space.”

We’re not sure how likely such a rule change is, but the man makes a point. Plus, if no other manufacturers want to take on Toyota, the FIA might not have a choice.

Source: Autocar

Source: http://ift.tt/JPPTFe

Aston Martin Thinks Hypercars Could Save Le Mans Racing

Currently, only Toyota is still committed to LMP1

No Obligation, Fast & Simple Free New Car Quote

With PorscheAudi, and Nissan now out of LMP1, the top level of endurance racing, Toyota is the only manufacturer left to compete at Le Mans. Since it’s not particularly exciting to watch one works team race itself, this has left the sport in an unstable position. But if Aston Martin gets its way, the FIA would try to save LMP1 by allowing road-based race cars.

Speaking to Autocar recently, Andy Palmer, CEO of Aston Martin, said officials from the FIA had approached him about potentially changing regulations to attract more automakers. His suggestion? Open LMP1 up to race cars based on production models.

“My personal perspective is very clear: Aston Martin will never compete in a prototype category because it has no relevance to us,” he said. “But if they allowed racing derivatives of road cars, that would be very interesting to us and, I suspect, the fans.”

The way Palmer sees it, having production-based cars compete in LMP1 would go beyond attracting more manufacturers. It would also keep with Le Mans tradition. “Road-derived race cars fighting for the win is in keeping with the history of sportscar and Le Mans racing,” said Palmer. “And the prospect of the likes of Valkyrie fighting against McLaren P1, LaFerrari and more would be interesting to more than just me, I suspect.”

When Autocar asked Palmer if Aston Martin would race the Valkyrie in LMP1 if the FIA adopted his rules suggestion, he responded, “Watch this space.”

We’re not sure how likely such a rule change is, but the man makes a point. Plus, if no other manufacturers want to take on Toyota, the FIA might not have a choice.

Source: Autocar

Source: http://ift.tt/JPPTFe

Report: Ford to End Fusion Production in North America

Ford will stop building the Fusion sedan in North America at the end of the decade, according to a report from Automotive News. Citing unnamed sources familiar with the matter, the report claims Ford has told suppliers it will not build the Fusion at its current home plant in Hermosillo, Mexico when it enters its third generation.

The report brings up the question of whether Ford will stop selling the Fusion in the U.S. or simply build it at another global plant. Ford will also reportedly stop building the Mondeo, Europe’s version of the Fusion, at a factory in Valencia, Spain. We’re unsure what to make of the reports, given the automaker expressed the importance of the Fusion to its lineup in a recent statement, also saying it won’t export the next-gen model from China to North America and Europe.

“We have no plans to export the next-generation Fusion/Mondeo from China to North America and Europe,” Ford said in an emailed statement to Motor Trend. “Fusion/Mondeo are an important part of the Ford car lineup. We will have more to share about the next-generation Fusion/Mondeo at a later date.”

A few months ago, Ford said it would offer fewer car nameplates in the future. The company is also reallocating $7 billion from cars to trucks and SUVs including the upcoming Ranger. If Ford chose to nix the Fusion from its North American lineup, it would become the highest-volume car to go out of production in the region as a result of the crossover craze.

According to one source cited by AN, Ford will produce the third-generation Fusion starting in 2020. It will be a 2021 model year vehicle. Fusion sales are down 22 percent for the first 11 months of this year in the U.S.

Recently, it was reported that Ford no longer plans to build an electric SUV at its Flat Rock plant in Michigan. Production of that model has been moved to Ford’s Cuautitlan Stamping and Assembly Plant in Mexico, reports say.

Source: Automotive News (Subscription required)

The post Report: Ford to End Fusion Production in North America appeared first on Motor Trend.

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Volkswagen I.D. Buzz Concept Review: Driving VW’s Electric Microbus Concept

Reinvention ain’t easy—just ask Blockbuster how well that DVD rental to streaming video transition went.

Volkswagen, long the poster child of efficient diesel transportation, is going through a similar (though hopefully far-more successful) transformation after its diesel emissions scandal, pivoting from diesel engines to a new family of electric vehicles, called I.D.








Ever pragmatic, VW knows it needs a global halo of sorts for its new I.D. lineup, which includes the not-for-U.S. Volkswagen I.D. hatchback and the global VW I.D. Crozz crossover. Both are acceptable if a bit bland, but neither meaningfully moves the needle into gotta-have-it territory.

Which is how I found myself in Los Angeles’ bro-hemian Venice Beach, behind the wheel of the VW I.D. Buzz concept. Slated to go into production in 2022, two years after the I.D. and I.D. Crozz, Volkswagen hopes the reborn electric Microbus will build buzz and amp up customers for its new I.D. lineup. Yes, this stuff writes itself.

The I.D. Buzz is a lot like Venice, where you’re just as likely to find hippies in drum circles and people living in their vans as you are the nouveau riche and tech bros in multistory modernist modules.








Its styling is a callback to VW’s free-love heyday. VW Group’s new modular MEB platform is the host for all three I.D. vehicles—which allows Volkswagen to nail the Microbus proportions and design of the I.D. Buzz, in that it artfully blends old styling cues with new. The cabin, which seats up to eight, is as versatile as the original, with seats that convert the cabin into a lounge or even a bed.

Underneath the I.D. Buzz’s retro sheetmetal is a modern platform with a floor-mounted battery, front and rear electric motors, and electrical architecture that should eventually allow the production version to drive autonomously. A caveat: The I.D. Buzz concept runs and drives, but it’s a long way off from what the production version will be like.

This one is more of a proof of concept, powered by an e-Golf powertain with 200 miles of range and limited to a mere 20 mph. But the production version should be able to go farther, faster. VW says there will be three powertrains with three battery sizes—a rear-drive 201-hp motor paired with a 60 kWh battery, a 302-hp dual-motor all-wheel-drive version with an 83 kWh battery, and another dual-motor all-wheel-drive version with 368 hp and a 100 kWh battery. Volkswagen says the production version should be able to travel between 250 and 310 miles on a charge.

For a hand-built concept, the fact that VW is confident enough to turn me loose on a half-mile stretch of Venice’s bustling Abbot Kinney Boulevard says a lot (though in retrospect, I did have an LAPD escort and two VW minders).

Press the “D” on the I.D. Buzz’s rectangular steering wheel to engage the concept’s single forward speed, tap on the accelerator (it’s helpfully marked with the “play” symbol; the brake gets the pause symbol), and the I.D. Buzz motors off smoothly and quickly like any run-of-the-mill EV. There’s not a ton of regeneration once off the throttle, but the brakes thankfully bite pretty well. The I.D. Buzz feels pretty agile considering its handmade tires, though its turning circle is wider than expected, an issue amplified by the oddly shaped steering wheel.

With five years to convert the I.D. Buzz from concept to reality, VW has plenty of time to make the I.D. Buzz fun to drive—something the original Microbus was in a prehistoric, underpowered way. Even if the I.D. Buzz drives like the original when it and its cargo van variant go on sale in 2022, it won’t matter—the crowds mobbing the concept in Venice show VW’s mission is already accomplished.















































































































The post Volkswagen I.D. Buzz Concept Review: Driving VW’s Electric Microbus Concept appeared first on Motor Trend.

Source: http://ift.tt/JPPTFe

Volkswagen I.D. Buzz Concept Review: Driving VW’s Electric Microbus Concept

Reinvention ain’t easy—just ask Blockbuster how well that DVD rental to streaming video transition went.

Volkswagen, long the poster child of efficient diesel transportation, is going through a similar (though hopefully far-more successful) transformation after its diesel emissions scandal, pivoting from diesel engines to a new family of electric vehicles, called I.D.








Ever pragmatic, VW knows it needs a global halo of sorts for its new I.D. lineup, which includes the not-for-U.S. Volkswagen I.D. hatchback and the global VW I.D. Crozz crossover. Both are acceptable if a bit bland, but neither meaningfully moves the needle into gotta-have-it territory.

Which is how I found myself in Los Angeles’ bro-hemian Venice Beach, behind the wheel of the VW I.D. Buzz concept. Slated to go into production in 2022, two years after the I.D. and I.D. Crozz, Volkswagen hopes the reborn electric Microbus will build buzz and amp up customers for its new I.D. lineup. Yes, this stuff writes itself.

The I.D. Buzz is a lot like Venice, where you’re just as likely to find hippies in drum circles and people living in their vans as you are the nouveau riche and tech bros in multistory modernist modules.








Its styling is a callback to VW’s free-love heyday. VW Group’s new modular MEB platform is the host for all three I.D. vehicles—which allows Volkswagen to nail the Microbus proportions and design of the I.D. Buzz, in that it artfully blends old styling cues with new. The cabin, which seats up to eight, is as versatile as the original, with seats that convert the cabin into a lounge or even a bed.

Underneath the I.D. Buzz’s retro sheetmetal is a modern platform with a floor-mounted battery, front and rear electric motors, and electrical architecture that should eventually allow the production version to drive autonomously. A caveat: The I.D. Buzz concept runs and drives, but it’s a long way off from what the production version will be like.

This one is more of a proof of concept, powered by an e-Golf powertain with 200 miles of range and limited to a mere 20 mph. But the production version should be able to go farther, faster. VW says there will be three powertrains with three battery sizes—a rear-drive 201-hp motor paired with a 60 kWh battery, a 302-hp dual-motor all-wheel-drive version with an 83 kWh battery, and another dual-motor all-wheel-drive version with 368 hp and a 100 kWh battery. Volkswagen says the production version should be able to travel between 250 and 310 miles on a charge.

For a hand-built concept, the fact that VW is confident enough to turn me loose on a half-mile stretch of Venice’s bustling Abbot Kinney Boulevard says a lot (though in retrospect, I did have an LAPD escort and two VW minders).

Press the “D” on the I.D. Buzz’s rectangular steering wheel to engage the concept’s single forward speed, tap on the accelerator (it’s helpfully marked with the “play” symbol; the brake gets the pause symbol), and the I.D. Buzz motors off smoothly and quickly like any run-of-the-mill EV. There’s not a ton of regeneration once off the throttle, but the brakes thankfully bite pretty well. The I.D. Buzz feels pretty agile considering its handmade tires, though its turning circle is wider than expected, an issue amplified by the oddly shaped steering wheel.

With five years to convert the I.D. Buzz from concept to reality, VW has plenty of time to make the I.D. Buzz fun to drive—something the original Microbus was in a prehistoric, underpowered way. Even if the I.D. Buzz drives like the original when it and its cargo van variant go on sale in 2022, it won’t matter—the crowds mobbing the concept in Venice show VW’s mission is already accomplished.















































































































The post Volkswagen I.D. Buzz Concept Review: Driving VW’s Electric Microbus Concept appeared first on Motor Trend.

Source: http://ift.tt/JPPTFe

Volkswagen I.D. Buzz Concept Review: Driving VW’s Electric Microbus Concept

Reinvention ain’t easy—just ask Blockbuster how well that DVD rental to streaming video transition went.

Volkswagen, long the poster child of efficient diesel transportation, is going through a similar (though hopefully far-more successful) transformation after its diesel emissions scandal, pivoting from diesel engines to a new family of electric vehicles, called I.D.








Ever pragmatic, VW knows it needs a global halo of sorts for its new I.D. lineup, which includes the not-for-U.S. Volkswagen I.D. hatchback and the global VW I.D. Crozz crossover. Both are acceptable if a bit bland, but neither meaningfully moves the needle into gotta-have-it territory.

Which is how I found myself in Los Angeles’ bro-hemian Venice Beach, behind the wheel of the VW I.D. Buzz concept. Slated to go into production in 2022, two years after the I.D. and I.D. Crozz, Volkswagen hopes the reborn electric Microbus will build buzz and amp up customers for its new I.D. lineup. Yes, this stuff writes itself.

The I.D. Buzz is a lot like Venice, where you’re just as likely to find hippies in drum circles and people living in their vans as you are the nouveau riche and tech bros in multistory modernist modules.








Its styling is a callback to VW’s free-love heyday. VW Group’s new modular MEB platform is the host for all three I.D. vehicles—which allows Volkswagen to nail the Microbus proportions and design of the I.D. Buzz, in that it artfully blends old styling cues with new. The cabin, which seats up to eight, is as versatile as the original, with seats that convert the cabin into a lounge or even a bed.

Underneath the I.D. Buzz’s retro sheetmetal is a modern platform with a floor-mounted battery, front and rear electric motors, and electrical architecture that should eventually allow the production version to drive autonomously. A caveat: The I.D. Buzz concept runs and drives, but it’s a long way off from what the production version will be like.

This one is more of a proof of concept, powered by an e-Golf powertain with 200 miles of range and limited to a mere 20 mph. But the production version should be able to go farther, faster. VW says there will be three powertrains with three battery sizes—a rear-drive 201-hp motor paired with a 60 kWh battery, a 302-hp dual-motor all-wheel-drive version with an 83 kWh battery, and another dual-motor all-wheel-drive version with 368 hp and a 100 kWh battery. Volkswagen says the production version should be able to travel between 250 and 310 miles on a charge.

For a hand-built concept, the fact that VW is confident enough to turn me loose on a half-mile stretch of Venice’s bustling Abbot Kinney Boulevard says a lot (though in retrospect, I did have an LAPD escort and two VW minders).

Press the “D” on the I.D. Buzz’s rectangular steering wheel to engage the concept’s single forward speed, tap on the accelerator (it’s helpfully marked with the “play” symbol; the brake gets the pause symbol), and the I.D. Buzz motors off smoothly and quickly like any run-of-the-mill EV. There’s not a ton of regeneration once off the throttle, but the brakes thankfully bite pretty well. The I.D. Buzz feels pretty agile considering its handmade tires, though its turning circle is wider than expected, an issue amplified by the oddly shaped steering wheel.

With five years to convert the I.D. Buzz from concept to reality, VW has plenty of time to make the I.D. Buzz fun to drive—something the original Microbus was in a prehistoric, underpowered way. Even if the I.D. Buzz drives like the original when it and its cargo van variant go on sale in 2022, it won’t matter—the crowds mobbing the concept in Venice show VW’s mission is already accomplished.















































































































The post Volkswagen I.D. Buzz Concept Review: Driving VW’s Electric Microbus Concept appeared first on Motor Trend.

Source: http://ift.tt/JPPTFe

Volkswagen I.D. Buzz Concept Review: Driving VW’s Electric Microbus Concept

Reinvention ain’t easy—just ask Blockbuster how well that DVD rental to streaming video transition went.

Volkswagen, long the poster child of efficient diesel transportation, is going through a similar (though hopefully far-more successful) transformation after its diesel emissions scandal, pivoting from diesel engines to a new family of electric vehicles, called I.D.








Ever pragmatic, VW knows it needs a global halo of sorts for its new I.D. lineup, which includes the not-for-U.S. Volkswagen I.D. hatchback and the global VW I.D. Crozz crossover. Both are acceptable if a bit bland, but neither meaningfully moves the needle into gotta-have-it territory.

Which is how I found myself in Los Angeles’ bro-hemian Venice Beach, behind the wheel of the VW I.D. Buzz concept. Slated to go into production in 2022, two years after the I.D. and I.D. Crozz, Volkswagen hopes the reborn electric Microbus will build buzz and amp up customers for its new I.D. lineup. Yes, this stuff writes itself.

The I.D. Buzz is a lot like Venice, where you’re just as likely to find hippies in drum circles and people living in their vans as you are the nouveau riche and tech bros in multistory modernist modules.








Its styling is a callback to VW’s free-love heyday. VW Group’s new modular MEB platform is the host for all three I.D. vehicles—which allows Volkswagen to nail the Microbus proportions and design of the I.D. Buzz, in that it artfully blends old styling cues with new. The cabin, which seats up to eight, is as versatile as the original, with seats that convert the cabin into a lounge or even a bed.

Underneath the I.D. Buzz’s retro sheetmetal is a modern platform with a floor-mounted battery, front and rear electric motors, and electrical architecture that should eventually allow the production version to drive autonomously. A caveat: The I.D. Buzz concept runs and drives, but it’s a long way off from what the production version will be like.

This one is more of a proof of concept, powered by an e-Golf powertain with 200 miles of range and limited to a mere 20 mph. But the production version should be able to go farther, faster. VW says there will be three powertrains with three battery sizes—a rear-drive 201-hp motor paired with a 60 kWh battery, a 302-hp dual-motor all-wheel-drive version with an 83 kWh battery, and another dual-motor all-wheel-drive version with 368 hp and a 100 kWh battery. Volkswagen says the production version should be able to travel between 250 and 310 miles on a charge.

For a hand-built concept, the fact that VW is confident enough to turn me loose on a half-mile stretch of Venice’s bustling Abbot Kinney Boulevard says a lot (though in retrospect, I did have an LAPD escort and two VW minders).

Press the “D” on the I.D. Buzz’s rectangular steering wheel to engage the concept’s single forward speed, tap on the accelerator (it’s helpfully marked with the “play” symbol; the brake gets the pause symbol), and the I.D. Buzz motors off smoothly and quickly like any run-of-the-mill EV. There’s not a ton of regeneration once off the throttle, but the brakes thankfully bite pretty well. The I.D. Buzz feels pretty agile considering its handmade tires, though its turning circle is wider than expected, an issue amplified by the oddly shaped steering wheel.

With five years to convert the I.D. Buzz from concept to reality, VW has plenty of time to make the I.D. Buzz fun to drive—something the original Microbus was in a prehistoric, underpowered way. Even if the I.D. Buzz drives like the original when it and its cargo van variant go on sale in 2022, it won’t matter—the crowds mobbing the concept in Venice show VW’s mission is already accomplished.















































































































The post Volkswagen I.D. Buzz Concept Review: Driving VW’s Electric Microbus Concept appeared first on Motor Trend.

Source: http://ift.tt/JPPTFe

Volkswagen I.D. Buzz Concept Review: Driving VW’s Electric Microbus Concept

Reinvention ain’t easy—just ask Blockbuster how well that DVD rental to streaming video transition went.

Volkswagen, long the poster child of efficient diesel transportation, is going through a similar (though hopefully far-more successful) transformation after its diesel emissions scandal, pivoting from diesel engines to a new family of electric vehicles, called I.D.








Ever pragmatic, VW knows it needs a global halo of sorts for its new I.D. lineup, which includes the not-for-U.S. Volkswagen I.D. hatchback and the global VW I.D. Crozz crossover. Both are acceptable if a bit bland, but neither meaningfully moves the needle into gotta-have-it territory.

Which is how I found myself in Los Angeles’ bro-hemian Venice Beach, behind the wheel of the VW I.D. Buzz concept. Slated to go into production in 2022, two years after the I.D. and I.D. Crozz, Volkswagen hopes the reborn electric Microbus will build buzz and amp up customers for its new I.D. lineup. Yes, this stuff writes itself.

The I.D. Buzz is a lot like Venice, where you’re just as likely to find hippies in drum circles and people living in their vans as you are the nouveau riche and tech bros in multistory modernist modules.








Its styling is a callback to VW’s free-love heyday. VW Group’s new modular MEB platform is the host for all three I.D. vehicles—which allows Volkswagen to nail the Microbus proportions and design of the I.D. Buzz, in that it artfully blends old styling cues with new. The cabin, which seats up to eight, is as versatile as the original, with seats that convert the cabin into a lounge or even a bed.

Underneath the I.D. Buzz’s retro sheetmetal is a modern platform with a floor-mounted battery, front and rear electric motors, and electrical architecture that should eventually allow the production version to drive autonomously. A caveat: The I.D. Buzz concept runs and drives, but it’s a long way off from what the production version will be like.

This one is more of a proof of concept, powered by an e-Golf powertain with 200 miles of range and limited to a mere 20 mph. But the production version should be able to go farther, faster. VW says there will be three powertrains with three battery sizes—a rear-drive 201-hp motor paired with a 60 kWh battery, a 302-hp dual-motor all-wheel-drive version with an 83 kWh battery, and another dual-motor all-wheel-drive version with 368 hp and a 100 kWh battery. Volkswagen says the production version should be able to travel between 250 and 310 miles on a charge.

For a hand-built concept, the fact that VW is confident enough to turn me loose on a half-mile stretch of Venice’s bustling Abbot Kinney Boulevard says a lot (though in retrospect, I did have an LAPD escort and two VW minders).

Press the “D” on the I.D. Buzz’s rectangular steering wheel to engage the concept’s single forward speed, tap on the accelerator (it’s helpfully marked with the “play” symbol; the brake gets the pause symbol), and the I.D. Buzz motors off smoothly and quickly like any run-of-the-mill EV. There’s not a ton of regeneration once off the throttle, but the brakes thankfully bite pretty well. The I.D. Buzz feels pretty agile considering its handmade tires, though its turning circle is wider than expected, an issue amplified by the oddly shaped steering wheel.

With five years to convert the I.D. Buzz from concept to reality, VW has plenty of time to make the I.D. Buzz fun to drive—something the original Microbus was in a prehistoric, underpowered way. Even if the I.D. Buzz drives like the original when it and its cargo van variant go on sale in 2022, it won’t matter—the crowds mobbing the concept in Venice show VW’s mission is already accomplished.















































































































The post Volkswagen I.D. Buzz Concept Review: Driving VW’s Electric Microbus Concept appeared first on Motor Trend.

Source: http://ift.tt/JPPTFe

Future Forza Motorsport 7 car additions allegedly discovered

An assortment of cars set to be introduced to Forza Motorsport 7 have allegedly been discovered in the game’s XML files.

[ai:grid size=5|classp=pull-right][ai:endgrid]Supposedly uncovered on the GTPlanet Forums by user ‘TheAdmiester’, the line-up consists of 12 vehicles that currently aren’t available in Forza Motorsport 7. The full list of cars highlighted in the GTPlanet post has been provided below:

 
  • 2077 "Fallout Atom"
  • 2016 Infiniti Q60 Forza Edition
  • 2016 Lexus RC-F GT3
  • 2016 Honda Civic GRC
  • 2015 Jaguar F-Type Coupe Forza Edition
  • 2015 Dodge Challenger Hellcat BT
  • 2012 Cadillac Escalade Forza Edition
  • 2011 Kia Cee’d
  • 1983 Jaguar XJR-5 #44
  • 1981 Ford Fiesta Forza Edition
  • 1957 Chevrolet Bel Air Forza Edition
  • 1956 Ford F100 Forza Edition

Of the 12 cars, six of them are Forza Edition models which (assuming the leak is legitimate) will likely be made available in Forza Motorsport 7 by completing time-limited Forzathon or Bounty Hunter Rivals challenges.

Additionally, the mysterious ‘Fallout Atom’ appears to indicate the partnership between Turn 10 Studios and the Fallout developer Bethesda is still active. To date, the most noteworthy product of this collaboration is the fictional Chryslus Rocket car’s addition to Forza Motorsport 6.

More significant to us at Team VVV, however, are the three racing cars included in this list. The IMSA-sanctioned Jaguar XJR-5 and Lexus RC-F GT3 vehicles are of particular significance, in light of the recently announced "strategic partnership" between IMSA and the Forza Motorsport series.

It’s also worth pointing out that previous Forza content leaks have been fairly accurate. A vast majority of the cars leaked for Forza Horizon 3 did eventually find their way into the game, with the aforementioned ‘TheAdmiester’ identifying almost all of the cars in Forza Horizon 3’s Hoonigan Car Pack months before the DLC’s release.

On the assumption that the leak is correct, it’s expected this previewed vehicles will be made accessible to Forza Motorsport 7 players in the near future. Source: http://ift.tt/2vxLMhE

Future Forza Motorsport 7 car additions allegedly discovered

An assortment of cars set to be introduced to Forza Motorsport 7 have allegedly been discovered in the game’s XML files.

[ai:grid size=5|classp=pull-right][ai:endgrid]Supposedly uncovered on the GTPlanet Forums by user ‘TheAdmiester’, the line-up consists of 12 vehicles that currently aren’t available in Forza Motorsport 7. The full list of cars highlighted in the GTPlanet post has been provided below:

 
  • 2077 "Fallout Atom"
  • 2016 Infiniti Q60 Forza Edition
  • 2016 Lexus RC-F GT3
  • 2016 Honda Civic GRC
  • 2015 Jaguar F-Type Coupe Forza Edition
  • 2015 Dodge Challenger Hellcat BT
  • 2012 Cadillac Escalade Forza Edition
  • 2011 Kia Cee’d
  • 1983 Jaguar XJR-5 #44
  • 1981 Ford Fiesta Forza Edition
  • 1957 Chevrolet Bel Air Forza Edition
  • 1956 Ford F100 Forza Edition

Of the 12 cars, six of them are Forza Edition models which (assuming the leak is legitimate) will likely be made available in Forza Motorsport 7 by completing time-limited Forzathon or Bounty Hunter Rivals challenges.

Additionally, the mysterious ‘Fallout Atom’ appears to indicate the partnership between Turn 10 Studios and the Fallout developer Bethesda is still active. To date, the most noteworthy product of this collaboration is the fictional Chryslus Rocket car’s addition to Forza Motorsport 6.

More significant to us at Team VVV, however, are the three racing cars included in this list. The IMSA-sanctioned Jaguar XJR-5 and Lexus RC-F GT3 vehicles are of particular significance, in light of the recently announced "strategic partnership" between IMSA and the Forza Motorsport series.

It’s also worth pointing out that previous Forza content leaks have been fairly accurate. A vast majority of the cars leaked for Forza Horizon 3 did eventually find their way into the game, with the aforementioned ‘TheAdmiester’ identifying almost all of the cars in Forza Horizon 3’s Hoonigan Car Pack months before the DLC’s release.

On the assumption that the leak is correct, it’s expected this previewed vehicles will be made accessible to Forza Motorsport 7 players in the near future. Source: http://ift.tt/2vxLMhE