Barn Find: 1965 Porsche 912

Barn Find: 1965 Porsche 912

As with most barn finds, this 1965 Porsche 912 has a special story. It was bought new in the Netherlands on Christmas Eve in 1965 by an exceptionally lucky man’s wife – who gifted it to him the next day on Christmas morning.

He clearly loved his present, as he kept it for over 20 years and used it regularly. The second owner took possession in 1986 and drove it only a few thousand kilometers before parking it in dry storage and largely forgetting about it.

30 years passed outside the storeroom’s steel roller door, the Iron Curtain fell, Tim Berners-Lee published a proposal for something called the World Wide Web, Nelson Mandela became the President of South Africa, the Channel Tunnel opened, a website called eBay was launched, the first Harry Potter book was published, the Y2K Bug didn’t happen, Apple released a product called the iPhone, water was discovered on the Moon, the Large Hadron Collider came online, and Bitcoin was invented.

Finally in 2017, the roller door was opened, and the dusty but all-original Porsche 912 was discovered. It’s worth considerably more now than it was in the late 1980s, Porschephiles have come to love the character of the flat four 356SC-powered car. If you’d like to read more about this 912 you can click here to visit the listing on RM Sotheby’s, or you can scroll down to read more about the Porsche 912.

The Porsche 912

The Porsche 912 was introduced in 1965 to be sold alongside the then-new Porsche 911 as it’s lower-priced sibling. Rather than just being an entry-level model, the 912 quickly gained a cult following among drivers for its near-perfect balance, lower kerb weight, and better handling than its more powerful brother.

Whereas the new Porsche 911 had a rear-mounted flat six, the 912 used a version of the outgoing 356 model’s flat four – an engine very well understood by Porsche as it had been in production for over 10 years. This flat four also had the benefit of being almost 200 lbs lighter than the flat six – particularly important when you remember that both engines are installed in the back, behind the rear wheels.

Porsche 912 Engine and Interior

The price of the incoming 911 was significantly higher than the outgoing 356, and some at Porsche worried about losing a swathe of their hard-earned marketshare. Although it wasn’t initially planned, it was realized that the 1.6L Type 616/36 engine from the Porsche 356SC could be fitted to the new 901 body (later renamed 911).

In order to further reduce the production cost, and therefore the MSRP, Porsche also fitted a 4-speed gearbox in place of the 5-speed in the 911. Inside the car the cost cutting continued, with a color-coded dashboard in place of the wood trim fitted to the 911, 3 gauges instead of 5, and a few other deletions giving the car a minimalist, unfussy interior.

Sales Figures and Heritage

The Porsche 912 significantly outsold the 911 for the first few years of production, largely because people were comparing it to the well-known Porsche 356 and oftentimes not to the new 911.

Revenue generated by the 912 greatly helped the still relatively small automaker in the mid to late 1960s, and in the decades since the company has made sure to offer a model in the 912 market segment.

After the 912 left production in 1969 it was replaced by the 914, which was followed by the 912E, the 924, the 944, the 968, and finally the Boxster and Cayman.

Porsche 912 Performance Figures

On release, the 912 had a dry weight of 2095 lbs and produced 90 hp, with 90 ft-lbs of torque. Owners quickly realized they could get over 30 miles to the gallon by driving conservatively, but even normal use would typically get ~27 mpg.

The 0-60 time of 11.6 seconds was unlikely to set the world alight, but remember these performance figures are all relative to the mid 1960s. Top speed was 119 mph, and owners could test this out for themselves on the autobahn. The 912 has a range of 450 miles per tank, a 60-0 mph stopping distance of 160 feet, and a front/rear weight distribution of 45/55.

A Brief Return

In 1975 the 912 made a brief return to production as the Porsche 912E. The 914 had experienced disappointing sales and so Porsche brought back the 912 model designation for the 1975 and 1976 models years.

Images courtesy of RM Sotheby’s ©2018 Dirk de Jager

The post Barn Find: 1965 Porsche 912 appeared first on Silodrome.

Source: https://silodrome.com January 18, 2018 at 01:12PM

The Original Fisher Astronaut Space Pen

The Original Fisher Astronaut Space Pen

Fisher Astronaut Space Pens have been used on every manned NASA space mission since Apollo 7 in 1968, the pen also features prominently in a now legendary episode of Seinfeld that was fittingly titled “The Pen” (episode 3, season 3).

Engineers spent years developing the space pen, ensuring that it could not only write upside down, but also write underwater, over grease, in extreme temperatures, in a vacuum, and on almost any material.

The secret to its success is a pressurized ink cartridge guarantees an even, dependable flow of ink in all conditions. Fisher offers a full lifetime warrantee on all pens, a safe bet considering their solid brass construction and well-engineered internals.

Each pen measures in at 5″ long and 0.375″ in diameter at the widest point, and they have a retractable, replaceable cartridge with a side release button.

These are great pens to have around the garage or workshop, they’re 100% made in the USA, and they ship out in a heavy duty box, with one Fisher Pressurized PR4 cartridge with a medium point and black ink. These pens may not be cheap, but they’ll probably be the last one you ever buy. Unless you give it to Jerry of course.

Buy Here

The post The Original Fisher Astronaut Space Pen appeared first on Silodrome.

Source: https://silodrome.com January 18, 2018 at 01:12PM

Ex-Works 1975 Fiat Abarth 124 Rallye Group 4 Spider

The Fiat Abarth 124 Rallye Spider was a comprehensively re-developed version of the famous little Italian roadster designed to race in the Group 4 division of the World Rally Championship.

Abarth is an Italian tuning house known for sometimes outlandish cars, built with an almost Machiavellian eye for performance above all else. Fiat took over Abarth in 1971, integrating the company as the Fiat Group’s in-house racing department.

Management of all racing operations was under the experienced eye of former-Ferrari V12 engine designer Aurelio Lampredi, and one of his first tasks was developing the racing version of the 124 Sport Spider – the Fiat Abarth 124 Rallye.

The Fiat 124 Sport Spider

The Pininfarina styled 124 Sport Spider was penned by American automobile designer Tom Tjaarda, one of the most prolific car designers of the 20th century, with 80+ vehicles to his name.

Fiat intended their new roadster to be a direct competitor for the popular British MGB, a car that was selling well on both sides of the Atlantic, and that would go on to have almost 500,000 units built by the time production ceased.

Tjaarda designed the two-seat roadster on a shortened version of the platform used by the Fiat 124 sedan to reduce production and development costs. The 124 used a steel unibody design with unequal length wishbone front suspension, and a coil sprung live axle rear.

Over the course of the 1966 to 1982 production run a series of engines were used, starting with a 1.5 litre unit capable of 89 hp and progressing through 1.6, 1.8 litre units, then ending with a 2.0 litre producing 133 hp.

The 124 Sport Spider proved to to be a significant success for Fiat, over 200,000 units were sold worldwide. The Italian automaker brought the model designation back in 2016 with the Fiat 124 Spider, based on the Mazda Miata platform, with a unique Fiat-designed body and a turbocharged Fiat Multiair engine.

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The Fiat Abarth 124 Rallye

When the Lampredi-led team at Abarth set about developing a homologation rally version of the 125 Sport Spider they did a lot more than jack up the suspension and slap stickers on fenders.

The prototype was stripped back to its bare shell and a number of steel panels were replaced with fiberglass to save weight. A roll bar was fitted in the passenger compartment and a new rigid hardtop was fitted to further improve rigidity and help with aerodynamics at speed.

The rear axle was removed and replaced with an independent suspension arrangement with lower wishbones, trailing arms, an upper strut, and an anti-roll bar. A limited-slip differential was used for better acceleration, particularly on loose surfaces, and wider alloy wheels were fitted front and back under new flared wheel arches.

The original seats were deleted and a new pair of competition seats were fitted, along with a revised dashboard, and an Abarth steering wheel. The centre console, rear occasional seats, and glovebox lid were also removed for weight savings, and the rear window was replaced with a Perspex unit.

The stand-out feature of the new Fiat rally car was its Abarth-tuned 1736cc twin-cam engine producing 128 bhp in road trim, with 170+ bhp available in rally trim. The power increase was largely thanks to double vertical twin-choke Weber 44 IDF carburetors and a new higher-performance Abarth exhaust with a twin mufflers.

The car successfully achieved FIA homologation in the Group 4 (special grand touring cars) racing class, and it began competing in the the World Rally Championship in 1972.

In 1972 it took wins at the Hessen Rally (1st and 2nd), and the Acropolis Rally (1st, 4th, 7th), and in 1973 it won the Polish Rally. In 1975 Maurizio Verini took five victories to win the European Rally Championship at the wheel of the final 16-valve version – forever securing the model in the annals of Abarth history.

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The Ex-Works 1975 Fiat Abarth 124 Rallye Group 4 Spider

This Abarth 124 Spider is one of just seven Olio Fiat works cars, it has in-period competition history, and according to Abarth it’s the best of the surviving Group 4 cars due to its originality, condition, and the fact that it still has all of its rare Abarth works parts fitted.

These seven works cars were the only examples to be fitted with the 16-valve version of the 1.8 litre engine, known as the “Testa Streta” or “Narrow Head”. These engines are capable of almost 200 bhp thanks to their Kugelfischer fuel injection system, a power figure made all the more impressive when you remember the kerb weight is just 863 kilograms (1902.59 lbs).

This car was one of the three sold to private entrants, it competed in the Italian and European Championships driven by Cuniolo/Poletti. It finished 7th overall at the Quattro Regioni Rallye in 1977 with Cuniolo/Poletti at the helm, and in the years after this it passed through the hans of a number of other Italian drivers.

Importantly the car was always maintained by an Abarth Classiche professional team, and it has Abarth Classiche certification. Its due to roll across the auction block with Bonhams on the 8th of February at Les Grandes Marques du Monde au Grand Palais. If you’d like to read more or register to bid you can click here to visit the listing.

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Images courtesy of Bonhams

Source: https://silodrome.com January 17, 2018 at 12:16PM

Ex-Works 1975 Fiat Abarth 124 Rallye Group 4 Spider

The Fiat Abarth 124 Rallye Spider was a comprehensively re-developed version of the famous little Italian roadster designed to race in the Group 4 division of the World Rally Championship.

Abarth is an Italian tuning house known for sometimes outlandish cars, built with an almost Machiavellian eye for performance above all else. Fiat took over Abarth in 1971, integrating the company as the Fiat Group’s in-house racing department.

Management of all racing operations was under the experienced eye of former-Ferrari V12 engine designer Aurelio Lampredi, and one of his first tasks was developing the racing version of the 124 Sport Spider – the Fiat Abarth 124 Rallye.

The Fiat 124 Sport Spider

The Pininfarina styled 124 Sport Spider was penned by American automobile designer Tom Tjaarda, one of the most prolific car designers of the 20th century, with 80+ vehicles to his name.

Fiat intended their new roadster to be a direct competitor for the popular British MGB, a car that was selling well on both sides of the Atlantic, and that would go on to have almost 500,000 units built by the time production ceased.

Tjaarda designed the two-seat roadster on a shortened version of the platform used by the Fiat 124 sedan to reduce production and development costs. The 124 used a steel unibody design with unequal length wishbone front suspension, and a coil sprung live axle rear.

Over the course of the 1966 to 1982 production run a series of engines were used, starting with a 1.5 litre unit capable of 89 hp and progressing through 1.6, 1.8 litre units, then ending with a 2.0 litre producing 133 hp.

The 124 Sport Spider proved to to be a significant success for Fiat, over 200,000 units were sold worldwide. The Italian automaker brought the model designation back in 2016 with the Fiat 124 Spider, based on the Mazda Miata platform, with a unique Fiat-designed body and a turbocharged Fiat Multiair engine.

fiat 124 abarth 12 740x492

The Fiat Abarth 124 Rallye

When the Lampredi-led team at Abarth set about developing a homologation rally version of the 125 Sport Spider they did a lot more than jack up the suspension and slap stickers on fenders.

The prototype was stripped back to its bare shell and a number of steel panels were replaced with fiberglass to save weight. A roll bar was fitted in the passenger compartment and a new rigid hardtop was fitted to further improve rigidity and help with aerodynamics at speed.

The rear axle was removed and replaced with an independent suspension arrangement with lower wishbones, trailing arms, an upper strut, and an anti-roll bar. A limited-slip differential was used for better acceleration, particularly on loose surfaces, and wider alloy wheels were fitted front and back under new flared wheel arches.

The original seats were deleted and a new pair of competition seats were fitted, along with a revised dashboard, and an Abarth steering wheel. The centre console, rear occasional seats, and glovebox lid were also removed for weight savings, and the rear window was replaced with a Perspex unit.

The stand-out feature of the new Fiat rally car was its Abarth-tuned 1736cc twin-cam engine producing 128 bhp in road trim, with 170+ bhp available in rally trim. The power increase was largely thanks to double vertical twin-choke Weber 44 IDF carburetors and a new higher-performance Abarth exhaust with a twin mufflers.

The car successfully achieved FIA homologation in the Group 4 (special grand touring cars) racing class, and it began competing in the the World Rally Championship in 1972.

In 1972 it took wins at the Hessen Rally (1st and 2nd), and the Acropolis Rally (1st, 4th, 7th), and in 1973 it won the Polish Rally. In 1975 Maurizio Verini took five victories to win the European Rally Championship at the wheel of the final 16-valve version – forever securing the model in the annals of Abarth history.

fiat 124 abarth 28 740x491

The Ex-Works 1975 Fiat Abarth 124 Rallye Group 4 Spider

This Abarth 124 Spider is one of just seven Olio Fiat works cars, it has in-period competition history, and according to Abarth it’s the best of the surviving Group 4 cars due to its originality, condition, and the fact that it still has all of its rare Abarth works parts fitted.

These seven works cars were the only examples to be fitted with the 16-valve version of the 1.8 litre engine, known as the “Testa Streta” or “Narrow Head”. These engines are capable of almost 200 bhp thanks to their Kugelfischer fuel injection system, a power figure made all the more impressive when you remember the kerb weight is just 863 kilograms (1902.59 lbs).

This car was one of the three sold to private entrants, it competed in the Italian and European Championships driven by Cuniolo/Poletti. It finished 7th overall at the Quattro Regioni Rallye in 1977 with Cuniolo/Poletti at the helm, and in the years after this it passed through the hans of a number of other Italian drivers.

Importantly the car was always maintained by an Abarth Classiche professional team, and it has Abarth Classiche certification. Its due to roll across the auction block with Bonhams on the 8th of February at Les Grandes Marques du Monde au Grand Palais. If you’d like to read more or register to bid you can click here to visit the listing.

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Images courtesy of Bonhams

Source: https://silodrome.com January 17, 2018 at 12:16PM

McLaren Ford DFV 919 Engine Block Coffee Table

When the McLaren Racing Formula 1 Team blew this engine during a test session in the mid-70s there are few who would have believed it would be offered for sale in Paris over 40 years later as a €1,500+ coffee table and wine rack.

Before its explosive demise, the Ford DFV 919 V8 F1 engine was used by Mike Hailwood in the 1974 Belgian Grand Prix (in the back of his McLaren M23) where he finished 7th and by Emerson Fittipaldi, who drove it to a win in the 1974 Canadian Grand Prix at Mosport Park driving – making him World Champion.

In order to convert the blown block into a coffee table and wine rack, a series of four chromed pillars were installed with a piece of rectangular glass on top. There’s also a pair of chromed legs, and a plaque that explains what the engine is, and gives the details of its race history.

Although the original engineers will never have considered it, the bore of the cylinders is ideal for holding wine and champagne bottles, or whiskey bottles if that’s more your thing. If you take a close look at the cylinder on the far left side, you’ll see the damage that was done when the engine grenaded itself on track.

More Here

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Source: https://silodrome.com January 17, 2018 at 08:15AM

McLaren Ford DFV 919 Engine Block Coffee Table

McLaren Ford DFV 919 Engine Block Coffee Table

When the McLaren Racing Formula 1 Team blew this engine during a test session in the mid-70s there are few who would have believed it would be offered for sale in Paris over 40 years later as a €1,500+ coffee table and wine rack.

Before its explosive demise, the Ford DFV 919 V8 F1 engine was used by Mike Hailwood in the 1974 Belgian Grand Prix (in the back of his McLaren M23) where he finished 7th and by Emerson Fittipaldi, who drove it to a win in the 1974 Canadian Grand Prix at Mosport Park driving – making him World Champion.

In order to convert the blown block into a coffee table and wine rack, a series of four chromed pillars were installed with a piece of rectangular glass on top. There’s also a pair of chromed legs, and a plaque that explains what the engine is, and gives the details of its race history.

Although the original engineers will never have considered it, the bore of the cylinders is ideal for holding wine and champagne bottles, or whiskey bottles if that’s more your thing. If you take a close look at the cylinder on the far left side, you’ll see the damage that was done when the engine grenaded itself on track.

More Here

The post McLaren Ford DFV 919 Engine Block Coffee Table appeared first on Silodrome.

Source: https://silodrome.com January 17, 2018 at 08:15AM

Death Machines of London Airforce Moto Guzzi

Death Machines of London Airforce Moto Guzzi

This feature was written by James Hilton, the proprietor of Death Machines of London. When possible we like to give custom builders the opportunity to tell the story of their bike, to give an insight into their thought process and methodology.

Designed in memory of Giovanni Ravelli: WW1 fighter pilot, motorcycle racer, and one of the founders of Moto Guzzi. Inspired by one of Giovanni’s biplanes and the Futurist movies of the time, Airforce has been released on the birthday of the aviation pioneer.

From the hand formed bodywork, to the aviation inspired chassis and wheels, Ravelli’s influence has shaped Airforce. In fact, pretty much every design decision began with ‘what would Giovanni do?’.

The Beginnings

The donor motorcycle, a 1982 Moto Guzzi LeMans Mk2, was discovered in a yard in southern Italy, having been involved in an argument with a truck. Left outside, it was quietly corroding away in the sun and salty air.

Despite its condition the potential was obvious and upon delivery back to our works in London, the strip down began. The engine was found to be in remarkable condition, with no major problems discovered. A full forensic inspection, vapour cleaning & reassembly, along with replacement bearings, seals gaskets completed the main engine work. The cylinder heads were subjected to a total refresh, along with our signature gas flowing. Carburation is through a pair of modified 36mm pumper Dell’Orto carburettors. The package is completed with our in-house velocity stacks and open slash cut headers.

Guzzi’s legendary ‘Tonti’ frame works. That is a fact. They handle well, you pick a line and they follow it, so any modification had to be limited. Our ‘what would Giovanni do?’ version of ‘limited’ was to radically modify, in the spirit of those pioneering times of course. Giovanni would have approved. As well as the obligatory de-lugging and subframe modifications, a custom in-house head stock was manufactured, to increase the rake by 3 degrees to 30. The original swing arm was swapped out for a heavily modified Moto Guzzi California swinging arm which was braced and coupled to a mono shock cantilevered system. Not something we’ve seen done before.

The frame and front wheel were then coated in our custom ‘Airforce Grey’, mixed specifically for this project. The wheels are modified California Hubs, laced to 21×3.00 aluminium rims, the rear utilising hand spun aluminium disc covers. Tyres are period Firestone items. The front end is a highly customised Aprillia RS250 arrangement, re-valved and refinished, while the rear suspension unit is an aviation-inspired bespoke item courtesy of Hagon.

Braking is taken care of by a pair of billet four pot Brembo calipers, operated remotely via cable to a Brembo RCS master cylinder. Designed and built in house, the 300mm rotors are one off DMOL designed steel items.

Engineering that has more in common with watchmaking, than with motorcycle building.

All the controls on Airforce are custom-made: clip-on tubes, grips, and internal throttle have all been fabricated in-house with pegs and controls working on modified Stucchi gear change linkage. Airforce also features our first set of completely custom levers: the inverse Lever Type IN01. Precision machined from aviation grade aluminium, the IN01’s will soon be available to buy as a part.

An M-Unit and custom loom controls the machines electric functions, with a single Xenon projector light working both hi and low beam and an LED rear light housed in our custom cluster. The speedometer has been redesigned and precision etched in nickel silver and brass, with dimmable radial illumination through a dedicated controller. Now, we know they didn’t have electric guitars and amps back in Giovanni’s day, but we like to think he’d be into his Foo Fighters, so ignition comes courtesy of a ¼ inch guitar jack with a built in immobiliser proximity sensor. Because hell yeah.

Hand-beaten aluminium bodywork that says one thing: Speed.

And finally to that bodywork. Beaten and welded by the hand of DMOL’s master craftsman, all the panelling has been built using the classic buck technique, where a wood skeleton is wrapped in aluminium – something Giovanni would’ve appreciated. This process, for obvious reasons, leaves imperfections – tiny hammer dents, small weld holes and the like. These are usually covered with filler and paintwork, but instead we chose to leave the metal raw and simply brush it – reminiscent of the WW1 fighter that was our inspiration for the project.

The front fairing slots into the side of the fuel tank, creating uninterrupted flowing lines. The lower concave curve of the fuel tank is mirror polished to reflect the high-gloss paint finish on the inside of the front fairing – the only part of the bodywork that is given this treatment. The bellypan is double-skinned, enclosing the exhaust pipes. Finally, the Italian leather seat features a hand-stitched pattern based on air-flow to enhance the impression of movement.

Airforce was built in 112 days (just in time for BikeShed 2017). So why did we wait so long to tell anyone about it? Because it needed to be better. There were parts we could’ve left alone without anyone noticing, except we noticed. It would’ve been far easier to not remake the belly pan or re-engineer entirely new levers. That would’ve been the easy thing to do. But as Mr. Giovanni Ravelli knew: the meek are seldom remembered.

Airforce is for sale at £70,000.00 – Click here to enquire on Death Machines of London

Follow Death Machines of London on FacebookTwitterInstagram

About Giovanni Ravelli

14 January 1887 – 11 August 1919
Ravelli and Carlo Guzzi served together as pilots in the Italian Air Corps during WW1, where they met the mechanic Giorgio Parodi and discovered they shared a common passion: motorcycles. They then decided they would start building them together. Unfortunately Ravelli was killed in a test flight accident and never officially joined the company. So to pay tribute to him they set the Airman Eagle as the centrepiece of the logo of their new company, Moto Guzzi.

About Death Machines of London

Founded by designer James Hilton and engineer Ray Petty, Death Machines of London is rapidly making a name for itself as one of the UK’s most innovative automotive design brands. DMOL represents the imaginative application of art and engineering to create beautiful bespoke machinery.

First – The Bike Shed

Photography by Ivo Ivanov

The post Death Machines of London Airforce Moto Guzzi appeared first on Silodrome.

Source: https://silodrome.com January 16, 2018 at 08:30AM

Death Machines of London Airforce Moto Guzzi

Death Machines of London Airforce Moto Guzzi

This feature was written by James Hilton, the proprietor of Death Machines of London. When possible we like to give custom builders the opportunity to tell the story of their bike, to give an insight into their thought process and methodology.

Designed in memory of Giovanni Ravelli: WW1 fighter pilot, motorcycle racer, and one of the founders of Moto Guzzi. Inspired by one of Giovanni’s biplanes and the Futurist movies of the time, Airforce has been released on the birthday of the aviation pioneer.

From the hand formed bodywork, to the aviation inspired chassis and wheels, Ravelli’s influence has shaped Airforce. In fact, pretty much every design decision began with ‘what would Giovanni do?’.

The Beginnings

The donor motorcycle, a 1982 Moto Guzzi LeMans Mk2, was discovered in a yard in southern Italy, having been involved in an argument with a truck. Left outside, it was quietly corroding away in the sun and salty air.

Despite its condition the potential was obvious and upon delivery back to our works in London, the strip down began. The engine was found to be in remarkable condition, with no major problems discovered. A full forensic inspection, vapour cleaning & reassembly, along with replacement bearings, seals gaskets completed the main engine work. The cylinder heads were subjected to a total refresh, along with our signature gas flowing. Carburation is through a pair of modified 36mm pumper Dell’Orto carburettors. The package is completed with our in-house velocity stacks and open slash cut headers.

Guzzi’s legendary ‘Tonti’ frame works. That is a fact. They handle well, you pick a line and they follow it, so any modification had to be limited. Our ‘what would Giovanni do?’ version of ‘limited’ was to radically modify, in the spirit of those pioneering times of course. Giovanni would have approved. As well as the obligatory de-lugging and subframe modifications, a custom in-house head stock was manufactured, to increase the rake by 3 degrees to 30. The original swing arm was swapped out for a heavily modified Moto Guzzi California swinging arm which was braced and coupled to a mono shock cantilevered system. Not something we’ve seen done before.

The frame and front wheel were then coated in our custom ‘Airforce Grey’, mixed specifically for this project. The wheels are modified California Hubs, laced to 21×3.00 aluminium rims, the rear utilising hand spun aluminium disc covers. Tyres are period Firestone items. The front end is a highly customised Aprillia RS250 arrangement, re-valved and refinished, while the rear suspension unit is an aviation-inspired bespoke item courtesy of Hagon.

Braking is taken care of by a pair of billet four pot Brembo calipers, operated remotely via cable to a Brembo RCS master cylinder. Designed and built in house, the 300mm rotors are one off DMOL designed steel items.

Engineering that has more in common with watchmaking, than with motorcycle building.

All the controls on Airforce are custom-made: clip-on tubes, grips, and internal throttle have all been fabricated in-house with pegs and controls working on modified Stucchi gear change linkage. Airforce also features our first set of completely custom levers: the inverse Lever Type IN01. Precision machined from aviation grade aluminium, the IN01’s will soon be available to buy as a part.

An M-Unit and custom loom controls the machines electric functions, with a single Xenon projector light working both hi and low beam and an LED rear light housed in our custom cluster. The speedometer has been redesigned and precision etched in nickel silver and brass, with dimmable radial illumination through a dedicated controller. Now, we know they didn’t have electric guitars and amps back in Giovanni’s day, but we like to think he’d be into his Foo Fighters, so ignition comes courtesy of a ¼ inch guitar jack with a built in immobiliser proximity sensor. Because hell yeah.

Hand-beaten aluminium bodywork that says one thing: Speed.

And finally to that bodywork. Beaten and welded by the hand of DMOL’s master craftsman, all the panelling has been built using the classic buck technique, where a wood skeleton is wrapped in aluminium – something Giovanni would’ve appreciated. This process, for obvious reasons, leaves imperfections – tiny hammer dents, small weld holes and the like. These are usually covered with filler and paintwork, but instead we chose to leave the metal raw and simply brush it – reminiscent of the WW1 fighter that was our inspiration for the project.

The front fairing slots into the side of the fuel tank, creating uninterrupted flowing lines. The lower concave curve of the fuel tank is mirror polished to reflect the high-gloss paint finish on the inside of the front fairing – the only part of the bodywork that is given this treatment. The bellypan is double-skinned, enclosing the exhaust pipes. Finally, the Italian leather seat features a hand-stitched pattern based on air-flow to enhance the impression of movement.

Airforce was built in 112 days (just in time for BikeShed 2017). So why did we wait so long to tell anyone about it? Because it needed to be better. There were parts we could’ve left alone without anyone noticing, except we noticed. It would’ve been far easier to not remake the belly pan or re-engineer entirely new levers. That would’ve been the easy thing to do. But as Mr. Giovanni Ravelli knew: the meek are seldom remembered.

Airforce is for sale at £70,000.00 – Click here to enquire on Death Machines of London

Follow Death Machines of London on FacebookTwitterInstagram

About Giovanni Ravelli

14 January 1887 – 11 August 1919
Ravelli and Carlo Guzzi served together as pilots in the Italian Air Corps during WW1, where they met the mechanic Giorgio Parodi and discovered they shared a common passion: motorcycles. They then decided they would start building them together. Unfortunately Ravelli was killed in a test flight accident and never officially joined the company. So to pay tribute to him they set the Airman Eagle as the centrepiece of the logo of their new company, Moto Guzzi.

About Death Machines of London

Founded by designer James Hilton and engineer Ray Petty, Death Machines of London is rapidly making a name for itself as one of the UK’s most innovative automotive design brands. DMOL represents the imaginative application of art and engineering to create beautiful bespoke machinery.

First – The Bike Shed

Photography by Ivo Ivanov

The post Death Machines of London Airforce Moto Guzzi appeared first on Silodrome.

Source: https://silodrome.com January 16, 2018 at 08:30AM

Death Machines of London Airforce Moto Guzzi

Death Machines of London Airforce Moto Guzzi

This feature was written by James Hilton, the proprietor of Death Machines of London. When possible we like to give custom builders the opportunity to tell the story of their bike, to give an insight into their thought process and methodology.

Designed in memory of Giovanni Ravelli: WW1 fighter pilot, motorcycle racer, and one of the founders of Moto Guzzi. Inspired by one of Giovanni’s biplanes and the Futurist movies of the time, Airforce has been released on the birthday of the aviation pioneer.

From the hand formed bodywork, to the aviation inspired chassis and wheels, Ravelli’s influence has shaped Airforce. In fact, pretty much every design decision began with ‘what would Giovanni do?’.

The Beginnings

The donor motorcycle, a 1982 Moto Guzzi LeMans Mk2, was discovered in a yard in southern Italy, having been involved in an argument with a truck. Left outside, it was quietly corroding away in the sun and salty air.

Despite its condition the potential was obvious and upon delivery back to our works in London, the strip down began. The engine was found to be in remarkable condition, with no major problems discovered. A full forensic inspection, vapour cleaning & reassembly, along with replacement bearings, seals gaskets completed the main engine work. The cylinder heads were subjected to a total refresh, along with our signature gas flowing. Carburation is through a pair of modified 36mm pumper Dell’Orto carburettors. The package is completed with our in-house velocity stacks and open slash cut headers.

Guzzi’s legendary ‘Tonti’ frame works. That is a fact. They handle well, you pick a line and they follow it, so any modification had to be limited. Our ‘what would Giovanni do?’ version of ‘limited’ was to radically modify, in the spirit of those pioneering times of course. Giovanni would have approved. As well as the obligatory de-lugging and subframe modifications, a custom in-house head stock was manufactured, to increase the rake by 3 degrees to 30. The original swing arm was swapped out for a heavily modified Moto Guzzi California swinging arm which was braced and coupled to a mono shock cantilevered system. Not something we’ve seen done before.

The frame and front wheel were then coated in our custom ‘Airforce Grey’, mixed specifically for this project. The wheels are modified California Hubs, laced to 21×3.00 aluminium rims, the rear utilising hand spun aluminium disc covers. Tyres are period Firestone items. The front end is a highly customised Aprillia RS250 arrangement, re-valved and refinished, while the rear suspension unit is an aviation-inspired bespoke item courtesy of Hagon.

Braking is taken care of by a pair of billet four pot Brembo calipers, operated remotely via cable to a Brembo RCS master cylinder. Designed and built in house, the 300mm rotors are one off DMOL designed steel items.

Engineering that has more in common with watchmaking, than with motorcycle building.

All the controls on Airforce are custom-made: clip-on tubes, grips, and internal throttle have all been fabricated in-house with pegs and controls working on modified Stucchi gear change linkage. Airforce also features our first set of completely custom levers: the inverse Lever Type IN01. Precision machined from aviation grade aluminium, the IN01’s will soon be available to buy as a part.

An M-Unit and custom loom controls the machines electric functions, with a single Xenon projector light working both hi and low beam and an LED rear light housed in our custom cluster. The speedometer has been redesigned and precision etched in nickel silver and brass, with dimmable radial illumination through a dedicated controller. Now, we know they didn’t have electric guitars and amps back in Giovanni’s day, but we like to think he’d be into his Foo Fighters, so ignition comes courtesy of a ¼ inch guitar jack with a built in immobiliser proximity sensor. Because hell yeah.

Hand-beaten aluminium bodywork that says one thing: Speed.

And finally to that bodywork. Beaten and welded by the hand of DMOL’s master craftsman, all the panelling has been built using the classic buck technique, where a wood skeleton is wrapped in aluminium – something Giovanni would’ve appreciated. This process, for obvious reasons, leaves imperfections – tiny hammer dents, small weld holes and the like. These are usually covered with filler and paintwork, but instead we chose to leave the metal raw and simply brush it – reminiscent of the WW1 fighter that was our inspiration for the project.

The front fairing slots into the side of the fuel tank, creating uninterrupted flowing lines. The lower concave curve of the fuel tank is mirror polished to reflect the high-gloss paint finish on the inside of the front fairing – the only part of the bodywork that is given this treatment. The bellypan is double-skinned, enclosing the exhaust pipes. Finally, the Italian leather seat features a hand-stitched pattern based on air-flow to enhance the impression of movement.

Airforce was built in 112 days (just in time for BikeShed 2017). So why did we wait so long to tell anyone about it? Because it needed to be better. There were parts we could’ve left alone without anyone noticing, except we noticed. It would’ve been far easier to not remake the belly pan or re-engineer entirely new levers. That would’ve been the easy thing to do. But as Mr. Giovanni Ravelli knew: the meek are seldom remembered.

Airforce is for sale at £70,000.00 – Click here to enquire on Death Machines of London

Follow Death Machines of London on FacebookTwitterInstagram

About Giovanni Ravelli

14 January 1887 – 11 August 1919
Ravelli and Carlo Guzzi served together as pilots in the Italian Air Corps during WW1, where they met the mechanic Giorgio Parodi and discovered they shared a common passion: motorcycles. They then decided they would start building them together. Unfortunately Ravelli was killed in a test flight accident and never officially joined the company. So to pay tribute to him they set the Airman Eagle as the centrepiece of the logo of their new company, Moto Guzzi.

About Death Machines of London

Founded by designer James Hilton and engineer Ray Petty, Death Machines of London is rapidly making a name for itself as one of the UK’s most innovative automotive design brands. DMOL represents the imaginative application of art and engineering to create beautiful bespoke machinery.

First – The Bike Shed

Photography by Ivo Ivanov

The post Death Machines of London Airforce Moto Guzzi appeared first on Silodrome.

Source: https://silodrome.com January 16, 2018 at 08:30AM

Death Machines of London Airforce Moto Guzzi

Death Machines of London Airforce Moto Guzzi

This feature was written by James Hilton, the proprietor of Death Machines of London. When possible we like to give custom builders the opportunity to tell the story of their bike, to give an insight into their thought process and methodology.

Designed in memory of Giovanni Ravelli: WW1 fighter pilot, motorcycle racer, and one of the founders of Moto Guzzi. Inspired by one of Giovanni’s biplanes and the Futurist movies of the time, Airforce has been released on the birthday of the aviation pioneer.

From the hand formed bodywork, to the aviation inspired chassis and wheels, Ravelli’s influence has shaped Airforce. In fact, pretty much every design decision began with ‘what would Giovanni do?’.

The Beginnings

The donor motorcycle, a 1982 Moto Guzzi LeMans Mk2, was discovered in a yard in southern Italy, having been involved in an argument with a truck. Left outside, it was quietly corroding away in the sun and salty air.

Despite its condition the potential was obvious and upon delivery back to our works in London, the strip down began. The engine was found to be in remarkable condition, with no major problems discovered. A full forensic inspection, vapour cleaning & reassembly, along with replacement bearings, seals gaskets completed the main engine work. The cylinder heads were subjected to a total refresh, along with our signature gas flowing. Carburation is through a pair of modified 36mm pumper Dell’Orto carburettors. The package is completed with our in-house velocity stacks and open slash cut headers.

Guzzi’s legendary ‘Tonti’ frame works. That is a fact. They handle well, you pick a line and they follow it, so any modification had to be limited. Our ‘what would Giovanni do?’ version of ‘limited’ was to radically modify, in the spirit of those pioneering times of course. Giovanni would have approved. As well as the obligatory de-lugging and subframe modifications, a custom in-house head stock was manufactured, to increase the rake by 3 degrees to 30. The original swing arm was swapped out for a heavily modified Moto Guzzi California swinging arm which was braced and coupled to a mono shock cantilevered system. Not something we’ve seen done before.

The frame and front wheel were then coated in our custom ‘Airforce Grey’, mixed specifically for this project. The wheels are modified California Hubs, laced to 21×3.00 aluminium rims, the rear utilising hand spun aluminium disc covers. Tyres are period Firestone items. The front end is a highly customised Aprillia RS250 arrangement, re-valved and refinished, while the rear suspension unit is an aviation-inspired bespoke item courtesy of Hagon.

Braking is taken care of by a pair of billet four pot Brembo calipers, operated remotely via cable to a Brembo RCS master cylinder. Designed and built in house, the 300mm rotors are one off DMOL designed steel items.

Engineering that has more in common with watchmaking, than with motorcycle building.

All the controls on Airforce are custom-made: clip-on tubes, grips, and internal throttle have all been fabricated in-house with pegs and controls working on modified Stucchi gear change linkage. Airforce also features our first set of completely custom levers: the inverse Lever Type IN01. Precision machined from aviation grade aluminium, the IN01’s will soon be available to buy as a part.

An M-Unit and custom loom controls the machines electric functions, with a single Xenon projector light working both hi and low beam and an LED rear light housed in our custom cluster. The speedometer has been redesigned and precision etched in nickel silver and brass, with dimmable radial illumination through a dedicated controller. Now, we know they didn’t have electric guitars and amps back in Giovanni’s day, but we like to think he’d be into his Foo Fighters, so ignition comes courtesy of a ¼ inch guitar jack with a built in immobiliser proximity sensor. Because hell yeah.

Hand-beaten aluminium bodywork that says one thing: Speed.

And finally to that bodywork. Beaten and welded by the hand of DMOL’s master craftsman, all the panelling has been built using the classic buck technique, where a wood skeleton is wrapped in aluminium – something Giovanni would’ve appreciated. This process, for obvious reasons, leaves imperfections – tiny hammer dents, small weld holes and the like. These are usually covered with filler and paintwork, but instead we chose to leave the metal raw and simply brush it – reminiscent of the WW1 fighter that was our inspiration for the project.

The front fairing slots into the side of the fuel tank, creating uninterrupted flowing lines. The lower concave curve of the fuel tank is mirror polished to reflect the high-gloss paint finish on the inside of the front fairing – the only part of the bodywork that is given this treatment. The bellypan is double-skinned, enclosing the exhaust pipes. Finally, the Italian leather seat features a hand-stitched pattern based on air-flow to enhance the impression of movement.

Airforce was built in 112 days (just in time for BikeShed 2017). So why did we wait so long to tell anyone about it? Because it needed to be better. There were parts we could’ve left alone without anyone noticing, except we noticed. It would’ve been far easier to not remake the belly pan or re-engineer entirely new levers. That would’ve been the easy thing to do. But as Mr. Giovanni Ravelli knew: the meek are seldom remembered.

Airforce is for sale at £70,000.00 – Click here to enquire on Death Machines of London

Follow Death Machines of London on FacebookTwitterInstagram

About Giovanni Ravelli

14 January 1887 – 11 August 1919
Ravelli and Carlo Guzzi served together as pilots in the Italian Air Corps during WW1, where they met the mechanic Giorgio Parodi and discovered they shared a common passion: motorcycles. They then decided they would start building them together. Unfortunately Ravelli was killed in a test flight accident and never officially joined the company. So to pay tribute to him they set the Airman Eagle as the centrepiece of the logo of their new company, Moto Guzzi.

About Death Machines of London

Founded by designer James Hilton and engineer Ray Petty, Death Machines of London is rapidly making a name for itself as one of the UK’s most innovative automotive design brands. DMOL represents the imaginative application of art and engineering to create beautiful bespoke machinery.

First – The Bike Shed

Photography by Ivo Ivanov

The post Death Machines of London Airforce Moto Guzzi appeared first on Silodrome.

Source: https://silodrome.com January 16, 2018 at 08:30AM